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The Second Machine Age Audiobook

The Second Machine Age: Work, Progress, and Prosperity in a Time of Brilliant Technologies

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Publisher's Summary

Audie Award, Judges' Award: Science & Technology, 2015

A revolution is under way.

In recent years, Google's autonomous cars have logged thousands of miles on American highways and IBM's Watson trounced the best human Jeopardy! players. Digital technologies - with hardware, software, and networks at their core - will in the near future diagnose diseases more accurately than doctors can, apply enormous data sets to transform retailing, and accomplish many tasks once considered uniquely human. In The Second Machine Age MIT's Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee - two thinkers at the forefront of their field - reveal the forces driving the reinvention of our lives and our economy. As the full impact of digital technologies is felt, we will realize immense bounty in the form of dazzling personal technology, advanced infrastructure, and near-boundless access to the cultural items that enrich our lives. Amid this bounty will also be wrenching change. Professions of all kinds - from lawyers to truck drivers - will be forever upended. Companies will be forced to transform or die. Recent economic indicators reflect this shift: Fewer people are working, and wages are falling even as productivity and profits soar.

Drawing on years of research and up-to-the-minute trends, Brynjolfsson and McAfee identify the best strategies for survival and offer a new path to prosperity. These include revamping education so that it prepares people for the next economy instead of the last one, designing new collaborations that pair brute processing power with human ingenuity, and embracing policies that make sense in a radically transformed landscape. A fundamentally optimistic audiobook, The Second Machine Age will alter how we think about issues.

©2014 Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee (P)2013 Brilliance Audio, all rights reserved.

What Members Say

Average Customer Rating

4.1 (90 )
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3.9 (75 )
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Performance
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  •  
    Mr. N. J. Houchin 08/04/2016 Member Since 2015
    HELPFUL VOTES
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    "Interesting book. Irritating narration"

    Insightful book on the exponential growth of technologies and ideas, the economic implications and possible solutions. Very interesting and thought provoking. Let down by irritating American infomercial style narration.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Jim London 07/06/2014
    Jim London 07/06/2014 Member Since 2011
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    "Important and thought provoking"

    The authors argue that digitial technology (in which they embrace computers, networks, the internet, smartphones etc) is accelerating the pace of tehcnologocal advancement at an exponential rate because of the phenomenon of combinatory innovation. So my laptop may not feel radically different to me compared to the one I had three years ago but a combination of it and the internet made it possible for Audible to create a business selling cheap audiobooks. So I can plough through potentially challenging reads like this in a weekend before moving onto whatever I find useful or interesting next. This in turn not only enriches my leisure time but also helps me learn stuff I can put to use at work for career advancement. The downside of that trend is that a few years after, say, the digital camera is invented Kodak go bust and that's not just bad news for Kodak employees; it's part of a wider phenomenon in which well paid jobs for ordinary people disappear and they're not replaced because the internet based enterprises that replace them just don't employ that many people. Worse still while the overall level of cash in the economy (referred to here as the "bounty") might stay the same or even increase it gets shared out in increasingly inequitable ways (a phenomenon called "the spread"). What does it all mean, where will it end up and what can we do about it?

    What I really liked about this book was the way the authors set out the issues, illustrate the impact they are already having, predict where it will go next and suggest what we should do about it at the level of public policy, education, planning our own careers and thiking about what to tell our kids (postgraduate qualifications may be the new degree). They identify the types of jobs that might be vulnerable (clerical, manufacturing and increasingly professional jobs requiring repetitive tasks fo areas of accountancy, law and medicine could be under threat) and those which look safer (problem solving or creative roles aided by computers or less well paid service jobs).

    Recommended for anyone interested in the future of technology and work.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  •  
    mike ryan 09/06/2015
    mike ryan 09/06/2015 Member Since 2015
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    "very enjoyable"

    well researched,written,and presented.Two guys that know their stuff.well worth a read.would definitly reccomend to anyone interested in tech.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Niels Bischoff 10/05/2015
    Niels Bischoff 10/05/2015
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    "Software is eating the world - nothing new here"

    Too heavy on macroeconomical stats, avoid listen to while operating heavy machinery are all costs!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    MR 05/02/2015
    MR 05/02/2015
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    "ok ish"

    I've heard similar theories on various free acedemic and business podcasts. I'd recommend Super Intelligence by Nick Bostrum.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  •  
    Marcus Paine London 05/09/2014
    Marcus Paine London 05/09/2014 Member Since 2013
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    "Everyone should read this book."

    From Baxter the robot, surely the embodiment of Asimov's 3 laws, to IT billionaires, to explaining how superstars make so much money today and dealing with the declining economic power of the middle and lower classes, this book covers a huge range, but never loses site of the authors objectives.

    These are: to let us know what is happening in the world as affected and supported by current technology,IT and the internet, to let us know the implications of these developments and then to gently suggest how we can deal with them.

    If you have even a passing interest in "The Singularity" as described by Verne Vinge, or how we will live with robots and a technological world in the future, then this book is a very real, non Sci-fi handling of the topic.

    I love Sci-fi. I've studied and use economics in my daily work. What the authors lay out and then discuss pulls together lots of interesting developments you may have heard about into a compelling and fascinating narrative. They have a positive view of the future whilst not shying away from the "negative externalities" (human and economic effects) of technology and its effect on local, national and global markets..

    I enjoyed it so much I've ordered the paper copy to read again, make notes in and reflect on

    An excellent book on a vitally important topic. I wish I could make all current and future politicians read it!

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
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  • Chris Lunt
    Mountain View, CA United States
    02/03/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Good for the periphery"

    Well organized, thoughtfully written, but if you're reading in the space, absolutely no new information. This is a book I'll recommend to readers who aren't already reading blogs and books covering similar topics. I did like the presentation as hopeful without being fervent.

    12 of 12 people found this review helpful
  • Michael
    Walnut Creek, CA, United States
    10/07/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Upbeat but Limited Survey of Exponential Change"

    This is an upbeat survey of a technical and very rapidly changing field. The field is changing so rapidly some of the technical information in this book was obsolete before it got published. For example there is a section on the Waze GPS mapping system. This was purchased by Google and integrated into Google Maps way back in 2013. As a survey, it provides mostly news stories (computer wins Jeopardy, etc.) and some related statistics, but very little deep thinking or analysis.

    I much preferred The Singularity is Near (which is weird, but thought-provoking) and Race Against the Machine (which is very much like this book, but clearer).

    The authors make a number of policy recommendations all of which seem amazingly short sighted, liberally biased, and basically ignore the authors' own primary hypothesis of an exponential inflection point in technology growth.

    The authors refer to the world being at an exponential inflection point of technical change (that is, the near future is about to be significantly different than the recent past would predict) yet the authors repeatedly indicate while discussing their recommendation, we are not yet on the brink of significant change, pointing out that change in the recent past has not been all that fast. So which is it?

    The authors seem largely to focus on mitigating "spread". Spread is the authors' code-word for income/wealth inequality. Interestingly, the book seems to me to have a strong liberal bias, yet it has been edited carefully so this bias is well cloaked from a casual reader.

    The Authors' make a bunch of policy recommendations:

    Education
    Use technology in education
    MOOCs in particular
    Higher teacher salaries
    Increase teacher accountability
    Increase hours spent in education

    Encourage Entrepreneurship & Start-ups
    Reduce regulation
    Upgrade Infrastructure
    Government support of new technologies with Programs & Prizes
    Use technology to match workers to Start-ups, including foreign workers
    Tax incentives for start-ups

    Raise Taxes
    Raise taxes on the rich and famous
    Increase maximum tax rate
    Increase non-worker tied corporate taxes including VAT
    Increase Pigovian Taxes (taxes on pollution)
    Traffic Congestion Pricing

    Increase Social Support
    Guaranteed Basic Income Cash or vouchers or Negative Income Tax
    Government run mutual fund paying citizens
    Encourage technologies which augment, rather than substitute for, human ability
    Implement Made-By-Humans advertising

    These policy recommendations seem largely unrelated to the technical revolution and include a lot of government control and wealth redistribution. I am somewhat dubious these are great ideas particularly if government uses the new technologies to enhance its already substantial power.

    So many important questions are totally ignored by this book. Is the developed world approaching stuff saturation? If so, how will a new service and entertainment economy work? Will humans be enhanced by technology? Will there be an enhancement backlash? Will nano-technology (or AI, or some other technology) go dangerously wrong? Should we be addressing such risk now? Such questions are raised in other books like The Singularity is Near.

    The narration was OK but not superb.

    37 of 40 people found this review helpful
  • Peter
    10/02/16
    Overall
    Performance
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    "This is about economics, not technology"
    Any additional comments?

    This has a lot less to do with technology and more to do with economics than I was expecting. I'm not a fan of economics, especially the in-depth discussions about it that happen in this book. I frequently found myself dozing off since the content was just so dull. There's definitely some interesting concepts and ideas, most of which I didn't know about, but the amount of depth that was added to each of those was just too much.

    The broad concepts were well structured and interesting on their own, but most of the sub-chapters were mostly unnecessary and often times I just felt like I was being bombarded with statistics. This could easily have been half the length and with some proper editing, could have been quite enjoyable even. The focus on American issues was also unnecessary, since the proliferation of technology is not just restricted to the USA.

    I think I was mostly disappointed due to having had the expectation that this book would go into the issues the arise from our current trends in technology. Although there is content about it, it's hidden in endless meandering about economics. I suspect people who are more inclined towards economics, would enjoy this more and people who enjoy thinking about statistics and economic theory even more so. However, not being American and not particularly enjoying either of those topics, I was just not the target audience for this particular book.

    2 of 2 people found this review helpful
  • Ian O'Neill
    16/07/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Sooo Many Examples"

    If you are up to date with the tech world, most of this books will be repetitive.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • shackga
    26/04/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Amazingly enlightening... exceeded expectations"
    Would you consider the audio edition of The Second Machine Age to be better than the print version?

    Yes


    What did you like best about this story?

    Not only did the book cover the topic of the technology but it provided great insights backed by statistics for a number of related areas. Best Audible book I have ever listened to.


    Any additional comments?

    I may go back and listen to it again since there were so many interesting points to digest.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Ren Michaels
    18/02/15
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Excellent ideas"

    Lots of unique thoughts and perspectives about the convergence of technology and implications for the future. definitely a left leaning perspective in some cases. Overall, very thought-provoking and had to stop many times to consider implications of the authors conclusions.

    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Gary
    Las Cruces, NM, United States
    05/09/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "The Androids are coming!"

    Books like this one are easy to enjoy. They are topical, informative and tell their story fairly fast. The digital age with its exponential growth and co-relational development is leading us to an inflection point.

    The authors steps the listener through the changes happening and demonstrates how the old metrics aren't always meaningful. Some of the digital changes such as Wikipedia (who buys encyclepedias today?) or Craig's List (who uses classifieds?) add immense value but they really don't show up in GDP, but yet add immense value to society. Predicting sunspot activities or automobile accidents can be determined better by individuals who aren't experts in the field as stated in this book. The second machine age is affecting change and the book presents many good examples.

    They take their premise to the point where the machines (androids) will start to replace most of what we do now. The authors delve into the economics and what the ramifications will be. The authors give a bunch of prescriptions to solving some of the problems they perceive coming down the pike. This is where the book is weakest.

    I thought Piketty's book "Capital in the Twenty-First Century" covered the economic ramifications of capitalism and Tim Wu's book "The Master Switch" covered changes that the digital explosion have brought better than this book did.

    Maybe everything they are suggesting (mostly government intervention of some kind) is correct and should be done, but the authors make a mistake of getting ahead of the conversation. It's good to be right, but one doesn't want to be right to far ahead of everybody else because nobody will hear what you have to say, and that's a problem with the authors prescriptions, and that was the real reason they wrote this book.





    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • Ben
    SAN FRANCISCO, CA, United States
    12/06/14
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "Well Researched and Expansive Analysis"
    What did you love best about The Second Machine Age?

    This is not just another book about artificial intelligence or the pace of technological advancement. It's a very thoughtful treatment of the broad implications for society and civilization.


    What was one of the most memorable moments of The Second Machine Age?

    The discussion of income disparities and capital accumulation was fascinating. It left me less hopeful about America's future without significant reform but more inclined to acquire equities and real estate.


    Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

    I found the book very interesting from start to finish. If you like Ray Kurzweil (The Singularity is Near) or Peter Diamandis (Abundance), you should definitely read/listen to this one.


    1 of 1 people found this review helpful
  • jerome m.
    03/12/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "worth a second listen again in the future."

    The book devoted more time to the social aspects of The Second Machine Age than was to my liking.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful
  • Tim Sultan
    San Francisco, CA United States
    31/10/16
    Overall
    Performance
    Story
    "A must read for public policy leaders"

    I walked away with a roadmap for human governments to establish AI safety & control. Also, critical to negotiate a mechanism for wealth distribution now.

    0 of 0 people found this review helpful

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