Listen free for 30 days

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea

Narrated by: Andrew Wincott
Length: 11 hrs and 16 mins
Categories: Classics, World Literature
4 out of 5 stars (11 ratings)

£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

Professor Aronnax, a French naturalist, begins an extremely hazardous voyage to pursue a little-known and terrifying sea monster. However, the ‘monster’ turns out to be a giant submarine, the Nautilus, which is commanded by the enigmatic Captain Nemo.

They explore underwater marvels, and find the ruins of Atlantis but Nemo has a hidden desire for revenge, which will not be ignored.

Public Domain (P)2013 W F Howes Ltd

Critic reviews

"A tale of terror, suspense, and wonder." ( Guardian)

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    7
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    5
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    6
  • 4 Stars
    1
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Twenty Thousand Leagues of Pleasure

I bought this version of the book because of Andrew Wincott. After listening to countless books I can say that Andrew Wincott is my top narrator, on the same level as Stephen Fry. His voice is deep as the seas of this book, pulling very intricate emotions and making you feel a part of the story.

The book combines unexpected plot twists, very advanced sci-fi science ideas, wonderful flora and fauna descriptions and exceptional characters. I especially loved the underwater experience as I'm a free diver.

I love every minute of this book. Thank you Jules Verne and Andrew Wincott.

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Main events were boring, characters pretentious

First of all, the whole book is spoiled by the summary.
It takes them 10/46 parts to establish that the submarine is in fact a submarine and not a monster.
Atlantis is like 2 paragraphs and overall very uninteresting.
The sea monsters are just random and at the very end of the book. Could have been ignored and would have not made any change to anything happening thereafter.

Why is this a classic?