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Thomas Carlyle (1795 -1881)

Narrated by: Neville Jason
Length: 15 mins
4 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Editor reviews

Neville Jason performs short essays of brilliance, designed to fill those few extra minutes with thought-provoking material. "Midas" by Thomas Carlyle laments that England in the 19th century has great wealth, but that this wealth has improved no one's life. Like Midas, the English wanted gold and when they got it, they found themselves cursed, the workers poorer than ever, the rich unfulfilled, Carlyle purports. With his British lilt and clear enunciation, Jason handles antiquated language and sentence construction with ease so that modern audiences will find this piece easy listening. They might even find some arguments that feel eerily contemporary.

Summary

This is an essay from the Favorite Essays collection.

Here, in this unusual collection, are some of the greatest essays in Western literature. Witty, informative and imaginative, the topics vary from starvation in Ireland, fine China, the extension of railways in the Lake District, and the tombs in Westminster Abbey. A little like after-dinner monologues, they are passing thoughts expressed as journalism. Neville Jason reads with urbane clarity.

©2009 Naxos Audiobooks (P)2009 Naxos Audiobooks

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  • joe
  • 10-12-18

Carlyle's critique of "industy" remains relevant!

The analogy to the Midas story remains timeless. What is all the increased efficiency and riches brought to our sense of humanity? What has been lost?