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Summary

'Whodunnit' doesn't matter so much, not to a forensic psychiatrist. We're more interested in the 'why'.

In his 26 years in the field, Richard Taylor has worked on well over a hundred murder cases, with victims and perpetrators from all walks of life. In this fascinating memoir, Taylor draws on some of the most tragic, horrific and illuminating of these cases - as well as dark secrets from his own family's past - to explore some of the questions he grapples with every day:

  • Why do people kill?
  • Does committing a monstrous act make someone a monster?
  • Could any of us, in the wrong circumstances, become a killer?

As Taylor helps us understand what lies inside the minds of his patients, using their own words to tell their stories, he presents us with the most important challenge of all: how can we find common humanity, even in the darkest of human deeds - and why it is so vital that we try?

The Mind of a Murderer is a fascinating exploration into the psyche of killers, as well as a unique insight into the life and mind of the doctor who treats them. For fans of Unnatural Causes, The Examined Life and All That Remains.

©2021 Richard Taylor (P)2021 Headline Publishing Group Ltd

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So Informative

This is an excellent book by Richard Taylor. His narration was excellent. So useful to students who want an overview and introduction to the subject and those laymen, like me, who want insight into this area without being overwhelmed in technical jargon. This book would be of interest to those touched by the issues raised and more informed of the treatments used in this troubling and difficult area of phycology.

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  • T.
  • 26-01-21

Fantastic

Such an interesting and insightful book, couldn't leave it alone! Highly recommend. There needs to be a book two!

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  • leelee8888
  • 11-02-21

Narration ruins what I’m sure is a great book

The books content is great, however, I could not get past the narration and found myself constantly distracted and eventually had to quit listening.

An author should not narrate books , leave that to the people who get paid to read, you write, they read. There are two reasons why an author would attempt to read their own work.
One is they are arrogant enough to think they could read it better and like the sound of their own voice.
The second is they felt they didn’t want to spend the money on something they felt they could do just as good.


Well I have news for ya, big big mistake.
Dnf this book. It’s being returned .

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  • M. Quinn
  • 27-01-21

Inside Look at the Work and Life of a Forensic Psychiatrist

This book blew me away. Part memoir, part true crime, part inside look at the duties of a forensic psychiatrist. Dr. Taylor expertly weaves these many facets into a compelling narrative. Drawing from his career of conducting forensic assessments of criminals Taylor divides each chapter into subsections of crimes (i.e. Sexual Homicide, Psychotic Homicide, Men Who Kill Their Partners). Each captivating in their own right, it is undoubtedly in the chapter entitled “Women Who Kill Their Children” that Taylor provides the reader with an account from his own life that is surely the most intriguing. Why does someone want to become a forensic psychiatrist? One might wonder what kind of sadistic eccentric would sit through years of medical lectures, training and countless exams (certainly a kind of prison in its own right) only to later routinely allow themselves to be locked inside an actual prison. Dr. Taylor provides us one possible answer. While offering enough details to allow the reader to feel a sense of intimacy into the personal tragedy, a familial infanticide, that would later shape Dr. Taylor’s view of those afflicted with mental illness who commit crimes. He expertly crafts the chapter (and book) without making it feel exploitative and gawky. He offers insight and understanding to the motivations behind horrific crimes that leave many of us bewildered and questioning “How could they do that something like that?” Taylor doesn’t oversimplify the medical explanations for the shocking acts of violence perpetrated by any of the patients he’s examined either. This book educates the reader and instead of wondering why some of the individuals committed their crimes, Dr. Taylor persuasively demands the reader begin asking “Why not?”

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