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The Mediterranean Diet Collection: Mediterranean Diet: 3 Books in 1

Mediterranean Diet for Beginners - Mediterranean Diet Ketogenic - Mediterranean Diet 30 Day Plan
Narrated by: Kat Marlowe
Length: 2 hrs and 14 mins
5 out of 5 stars (25 ratings)

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Summary

Would you like to eat healthy, lose weight, while still enjoying delicious food?

I know how it feels.... You start thinking, “I need to go on a diet,” and suddenly you can’t stop thinking about your favorite foods, guilt feelings creep up each time you eat a mouthful of food that you think “you shouldn’t” eat. Does that sound familiar?

It doesn’t have to be that way. You can have a healthy lifestyle and still enjoy good food and also your favorite foods in moderation. These books will give you not only an answer but a practical solution to stop struggling with body weight, cravings, and preparing meals.

My name is Sabrina Smeraldini, and creating different recipes with fresh ingredients is my passion. 

The Mediterranean Diet Collection is comprised of three books, specifically:

Book 1 - Mediterranean Diet for Beginners

The Mediterranean Diet for Beginners is a guide that will bring the flavors of the Mediterranean countries to your dinner table. 

Book 2 - Mediterranean Diet Ketogenic

This book will teach you the basic about the Keto diet - how it works for weight loss and how you can combine it with the Mediterranean diet.

Book 3 - Mediterranean Diet 30 Day Plan

With this complete collection, I will give you precise instructions on how to prepare delicious recipes, easy to make, tasty, and filled with nutritious foods. You’ll feel better, have more energy, and uplift your mood. You’ll discover how you can improve your overall wellbeing and naturally stabilize your weight.

Click the buy button and start a healthier life today!

©2019 Sabrina Smeraldini (P)2019 Sabrina Smeraldini

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Things You Should Never Do

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting over 30 million adults in the United States. It develops when the cartilage in the joints breaks down over time. The condition can affect any joint in the body, but people often notice it in their knees, hands, hips, or spine. This review will look at which foods people with osteoarthritis should include in their diet and which they should avoid. We also bust some common food myths regarding arthritis.

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Think You Know How To Diet

The Mediterranean diet may also be helpful for people who are trying to lose weight. The authors review noted that people who were overweight or had obesity lost more weight on the Mediterranean diet than on a low-fat diet. The Mediterranean diet group achieved results that were similar to those of the participants on other standard weight loss diets.

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Smart Strategies To Diet

Evidence suggests that a Mediterranean diet may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. A study that featured in The New England Journal of Medicine compared two Mediterranean diets with a control diet for almost 5 years. The research suggested that the diet reduced the risk of cardiovascular issues, including stroke, heart attack, and death, by about 30 percent compared with the control group. More studies are necessary to determine whether lifestyle factors, such as more physical activity and extended social support systems, are partly responsible for the lower incidence of heart disease in Mediterranean countries than in the United States.

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Getting Smart With Diet

The Mediterranean diet puts a higher focus on plant foods than many other diets. It is not uncommon for vegetables, whole grains, and legumes to make up all or most of a meal. People following the diet typically cook these foods using healthful fats, such as olive oil, and add plenty of flavorful spices. Meals may include small portions of fish, meat, or eggs. Water and sparkling water are common drink choices, as well as moderate amounts of red wine.

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Clever Tools To Simplify Your Diet

Essentially, following a Mediterranean diet means eating in the way that the people in the Mediterranean region traditionally ate.

A traditional diet from the Mediterranean region includes a generous portion of fresh produce, whole grains, and legumes, as well as some healthful fats and fish.

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No-Nonsense To Diet

The Mediterranean diet is a delicious and healthy way to eat. Many people who switch to this style of eating say they'll never eat any other way. Substitute fish, poultry or beans for meat. If you eat meat, make sure it's lean and keep portions small. Eat low-fat Greek or plain yogurt and small amounts of a variety of cheeses. Switch to whole-grain bread, cereal and pasta. Experiment with other whole grains, such as bulgur and farro.

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The Go-Getter’s Guide To Diet

Try olive oil as a replacement for butter when cooking. Instead of putting butter or margarine on bread, try dipping it in flavored olive oil.Eat fish twice a week. Fresh or water-packed tuna, salmon, trout, mackerel and herring are healthy choices. Grilled fish tastes good and requires little cleanup. Avoid deep-fried fish.

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Dirty Little Secrets Of Diet

This cookbook has great recipes, and the accompanying text makes it even better. Two issues: first, photos would be helpful, along with suggestions for what to serve with what.
Second, it would be better if each recipe were on one page; having to flip a page back & forth in the course of cooking is unhandy. I hope the next edition has better editing for ease of use and clarity.

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Secrets To Diet

One of the features that makes the book work for me is the stories that accompany each recipe. This is such a diverse region with differing food traditions and palates that the introductory paragraphs help set a context for each recipe.
I agree with others that pictures would be nice. In 2009 there are a bunch of books on the market where the pictures are better than the recipes. But even if a picture is worth a thousand words, in the end I need the ingredients, steps, and times to put the dish together, so I can't take away a star for leaving the pictures out.

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Things You Didn’t Know about Diet

The book has a lot of ideas that I've just not seen before. Last night I served the grilled asparagus with bitter orange and it was a refreshing change from the usual puddle of olive oil. Tonight I'm trying the fish and spinach au gratin. Tomorrow, the swordfish with almond sauce. These are three dishes I hadn't seen even though I have several cookbooks from the Mediterranean region. And the book is loaded with recipes for next week. What to try next? I'm a happy man and my family is going to be happier.

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  • Sebastian Rory
  • 20-07-19

Actionable Ways To Diet

The Mediterranean diet typically allows red wine in moderation. Although alcohol has been associated with a reduced risk of heart disease in some studies, it's by no means risk free. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans caution against beginning to drink or drinking more often on the basis of potential health benefits.

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  • Jaxon Adam
  • 20-07-19

Most Strategic Ways To Accelerate Your Diet

Fish are also important in the Mediterranean diet. Fatty fish — such as mackerel, herring, sardines, albacore tuna, salmon and lake trout — are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, a type of polyunsaturated fat that may reduce inflammation in the body. Omega-3 fatty acids also help decrease triglycerides, reduce blood clotting, and decrease the risk of stroke and heart failure.

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  • Reggie Edward
  • 20-07-19

Triple Your Results Without Diet

Healthy fats are a mainstay of the Mediterranean diet. They're eaten instead of less healthy fats, such as saturated and trans fats, which contribute to heart disease.

Olive oil is the primary source of added fat in the Mediterranean diet. Olive oil provides monounsaturated fat, which has been found to lower total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL or "bad") cholesterol levels. Nuts and seeds also contain monounsaturated fat.

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  • Tommy Arlo
  • 20-07-19

Simple Things You Can Do To Diet

The foundation of the Mediterranean diet is vegetables, fruits, herbs, nuts, beans and whole grains. Meals are built around these plant-based foods. Moderate amounts of dairy, poultry and eggs are also central to the Mediterranean Diet, as is seafood. In contrast, red meat is eaten only occasionally.

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  • Daniel Joseph
  • 20-07-19

Simple Rule To Diet

The Mediterranean diet is a way of eating based on the traditional cuisine of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea. While there is no single definition of the Mediterranean diet, it is typically high in vegetables, fruits, whole grains, beans, nut and seeds, and olive oil.

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  • Hunter Alexander
  • 20-07-19

Easy Fixes to Diet

The Mediterranean diet is one of the healthy eating plans recommended by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans to promote health and prevent chronic disease.

It is also recognized by the World Health Organization as a healthy and sustainable dietary pattern and as an intangible cultural asset by the United National Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.

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  • Mason Harrison
  • 20-07-19

Tips for Effortless Diet Plan

Interest in the Mediterranean diet began in the 1960s with the observation that coronary heart disease caused fewer deaths in Mediterranean countries, such as Greece and Italy, than in the U.S. and northern Europe. Subsequent studies found that the Mediterranean diet is associated with reduced risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

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  • Teddy Finley
  • 19-07-19

The Ultimate Cheat Sheet On Diet

If I was some kid picking up this book I would be immediately intimidated due to the boringness of the pages and text reading so stale. Also the ingredient list per recipe can be long ranging from 7 or 8 ingredients to 15 or more. Inexperienced cooks may see this as a huge shopping list and expensive bill, but take notice that much of the ingredients are spices, herbs and other things that come plentiful and per recipe comes under $5 a meal. The time and prep work is probably the biggest challenge to cooking the mediterranean way, it never seems to get easier, but the benefits outweigh the cost in this case.

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  • Lucas Ethan
  • 19-07-19

Point Checklist Of Diet

I happen to live close to a middle eastern community, so access to some of these 'special' ingredients like Harissa and lamb comes easy for me, but it may not for you. Another major factor in these recipes are the home-cooked approach to meals. What I mean by this is that there is no sense of waste in most of the meals, as most of the ingredients are the same from recipe to recipe. You will use a whole onion, a whole potato, a whole carrot. Not some 1/3 onion and 1/4 of another kind of onion as some recipe books call for, leaving you with a chunk of ingredient you can't save or use readily for something else. Everything connects well with other recipes, so some leftover carrots and celery can be used for a soup or something to accompany the meal and whatever you make can be stored for some time.

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  • Mike Smith
  • 19-07-19

The Ultimate Guide To Diet

There is no breakfast in the traditional sense. This lifestyle like manual for mediterranean culture addresses many points about how and what we eat and how to do them differently, starting with breakfast. Indeed there are cookbooks that feature many middle eastern and greek varieties of what we call breakfast foods, but these are hard pressed to be strictly breakfast like in western society. The main focus is on vegetable based meals prepared as soups, salads, stews, etc. and less on presentation recipes with meat and expensive eye candy which is not what mediterranean food is designed. In fact, there are no pictures in this book, which is one of the reasons why I'm giving it 4 stars, but also after a few weeks of steady cooking from this book, you can easily make anything presentable for guests with some simple technique.