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Summary

Random House presents the audiobook edition of The Largesse of the Sea Maiden by Denis Johnson, read by Nick Offerman, Michael Shannon, Dermot Mulroney, Will Patton, and Liev Schreiber.

The Largesse of the Sea Maiden is the long-awaited new story collection from Denis Johnson, author of the groundbreaking, highly acclaimed Jesus' Son. Written in the same luminous prose, this collection finds Johnson in new territory, contemplating mortality, the ghosts of the past, and the elusive and unexpected ways the mysteries of the universe assert themselves.

Finished shortly before Johnson's death, this collection is the last word from a writer whose work will live on for many years to come.

©2018 Denis Johnson (P)2018 Random House Audiobooks

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Bewitching, slow and intense

This was an odd book, beguiling but also a little slow. It's the first I've read by Denis Johnson. I saw it in a bookshop and read a paragraph and didn't buy it. But... found the images created in that paragraph stuck with me. And that's how I've found much of this book - images from it return repeatedly.

The narration is very slow and I listened at double speed (and it still didn't feel fast). Add to that the fact the stories themselves unfold quite slowly and there is a ponderous moment or two in the text. There's a very long rambling piece about a drunk who may or may not be going mad that I found quite tedious - but again with moments of lucid clarity of image that have stuck.

Definitely worth the read and I'll probably read more by the author