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Summary

Deeply in love and about to marry, students Misha and Sophia flee a Warsaw under Nazi occupation for a chance at freedom. Forced to return to the Warsaw ghetto, they help Misha's mentor, Dr Korczak, care for the 200 children in his orphanage.

As the noose tightens around the ghetto, Misha and Sophia are torn from one another, forcing them to face their worst fears alone.

Meanwhile, refusing to leave the children unprotected, Korczak must confront a terrible darkness.

©2018 Elisabeth Gifford (P)2018 W.F. Howes Ltd

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  • Margaret
  • Nieuwerkerk a.d. IJssel, Netherlands
  • 26-06-18

Humanity and inhumanity

This book show how different people can be- kind caring loving in a time of horror and hate. With tears in my eyes I listened to the last chapters remembering my visit to Warsaw and the museum and former prison there. Everyone should read this book which told gently and in an atmosphere of kind shows how hate invaded the city of Warsaw and the world.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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Simultaneously heartbreaking and uplifting

This is a story I'd never heard of - even vaguely - so I had no real idea how things would end up in the case of these specific people.

But it's a recounting of events seen from several points of view, and with just enough exposition to allow you to keep track of the overall arc. Elisabeth Gifford's characterisations are memorable, and memorably realised by Peter Noble (both artists in their respective fields that I'd seek out again)

Hard to know what else to say; the period and description frame things so that you know there are only so many ways things can unfold. But it's resolved in a way that is respectful to the true story and still hopeful. Not something I thought it would be possible to pull off. In some respects, what you can realistically take away as comforting as a reader runs in parallel with the diminishing options faced by the protagonists; things become pared down to necessity at a suddenly accelerating rate.

I'm surprised to see the book was ~9hrs long when I came to review. I felt I'd spent far more time in the company of these people by the end, and it's a tribute to the writing and performing styles. No wasted prose, no longueurs.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful