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Summary

The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft: a brand new anthology that collects the 12 principal deities of the Lovecraftian Mythos and sets them loose. Featuring the biggest names in horror and dark fantasy, including many New York Times best sellers; full of original fiction; and individual commentary on each of the deities by Donald Tyson.

Lovecraft's bestiary of gods has had a major influence on the horror scene from the time these sacred names were first evoked. Cthulhu, Azathoth, Nyarlathotep, Yog-Sothoth - this pantheon of the horrific calls to mind the very worst of cosmic nightmares and the very darkest signs of human nature. The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft brings together 12 all-new Mythos tales from: Cthulhu (Adam Nevill) , Yog-Sothoth (Martha Wells), Azathoth (Laird Barron) , Nyarlathotep (Bentley Little), Shub-Niggurath (David Liss), Tsathoggua (Brett Talley), The Mi-Go (Christopher Golden and James A. Moore); Night-gaunts (Jonathan Maberry); Elder Things (Joe Lansdale); Great Race (Rachel Caine); Yig (Douglas Wynne); and The Deep Ones (Seanan McGuire).

©2015 Journalstone Publishing (P)2016 Journalstone Publishing

What listeners say about The Gods of H. P. Lovecraft

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    4 out of 5 stars

Great stories, poor narration

The stories themselves are fine but the narrator sounds like a computer generated voice - uttery monotonous and oddly stilted. To be honest, I think the written version would have been a better choice.

2 people found this helpful

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poor collection of stories

i wanted to like this book but the stories were very poor. the worst was laird barron's., which is not unusual as i have yet to read a good story of his. tim curran's here be monster s is a far better collection. give this a miss

3 people found this helpful

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Profile Image for Old ManParker
  • Old ManParker
  • 16-11-16

H.P. Lovecraft's Mysteries Revealed & Explained!

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?
A fine serving of really frightening stories with scary, disgusting monsters. True to the Cthulhu Mythos of H. P. Lovecraft, it's spiked with moments of absolute wonder & even wry humor.

What other book might you compare The Gods of H. P. Lovecraft to and why?
The best part about "The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft" is that it's not the one-note unrelenting brain-breaking horror that some other anthologies have done. "The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft" opens up to the wonder and beauty Lovecraft wrote about in his "Dream Cycle" books as well.

Which character – as performed by David Stifel – was your favorite?
He's very a talented reader. He knows how to not "over act" or get in the way of the book. I am a fan. However, his many mispronunciations were strangely not the extremely difficult-to-pronounce alien words of the Cthulhu mythos - it's english that's his bane!

Did you have an extreme reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?
I never wanted "The Fungi From Yu Go" to take my brain out of my head and put in it into a metal container and take it to the stars before, but after listening to "The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft", now I think it might be pretty great.

Of course, when I first read H.P. Lovecraft, ( …and I drew an ink drawing in my high school Art Class of the horrific brain stealing "Migo" - one of the things that could not be described - and which got much comment when it was displayed up on the wall in the classroom ) I was young and my body was strong and pain-free. Now, I'm an old man with a life-time of martial art's injuries all screaming when I climb out of bed in the morning. I think maybe taking my mind out of this creaking old husk and setting it free to fly across the dark cosmos with Lovecraftian aliens would not be so bad. Huh, interesting.

Any additional comments?
H.P. Lovecraft's Mysteries Revealed & Explained!

I never wanted "The Fungi From Yu Go" to take my brain out of my head and put in it into a metal container and take it to the stars before, but after listening to "The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft", now I think it might be pretty great.

Of course, when I first read H.P. Lovecraft, ( …and created an ink drawing in my high school Art Class of the horrific brain stealing "Migo" - one of the things that could not be described - and which got much comment when it was displayed up on the wall in the classroom ) I was young and my body was strong and pain-free. Now, I'm an old man with a life-time of martial art's injuries all screaming when I climb out of bed in the morning. I think maybe taking my mind out of this creaking old husk and setting it free to fly across the dark cosmos with Lovecraftian aliens would not be so bad. Huh, interesting.

Well, be that as it may… The best part about "The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft" is that it's not the one-note unrelenting brain-breaking horror that some other anthologies have done. "The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft" opens up to the wonder and beauty Lovecraft wrote about in his "Dream Cycle" books as well.

That's the greatest gift of Lovecraft. Yes, the Universe is far Darker than we know (or can know) and our place in it is very precarious, but, if you can get past that (with your sanity somewhat intact) the Universe is even more beautiful then we know as well.

"The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft" has fine helping of real frightening moments and very scary and disgusting monsters. It also has moments of absolute wonder and even wry humor. Everything you could desire in a "Neo-Love-craftian" book. "The Gods of H.P. Lovecraft" is full of good stories with solid plots; beginnings, middles, and ends. Satisfying reading. You dig Lovecraft?

Get This book!

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  • Lauens
  • 17-10-16

Great story... hard to listen to

I was pumped to get some modern twists on cosmic and arcane horror, and had I read the book I would have been satisfied.
the stories are great but the narrator actually killed the whole book. terrible inflection terrible punctuation and timing. so put eyes to ink for this one folks

14 people found this helpful

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  • KL
  • 12-02-17

Starts of slow but very good

Started off very slow with 3 terrible stories. But after that it was very good! The narrator just does a mediocre job. Sounds like johnny cash. But over all pretty good. I would recommend.

7 people found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 18-04-17

Quite good for a collection of fan novels.

The narration is really good. The stories are varied and interresting. Very good for fan fiction. They cover some more known gods and critters from the lore.

2 people found this helpful

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  • Vincent Renfield
  • 20-12-16

Poorly narrated. Awesome format.

I love the way that this book is structured. Each story is preceded by a short description of the elder god that is highlighted in the story. Unfortunately, the narrator sounds like a confused nursing home patient trying to read a medical textbook he found in a dumpster.

11 people found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 05-09-16

Outstanding narration and storytelling

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

This collection is not one of a kind, but it's one of the best of it's kind.

4 people found this helpful

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  • Uncle Bosco
  • 28-05-17

Fantastic Stories

Each story was wonderful in its own way. For many of the stories the narration added a great deal to the stories. However, the choice to use a single narrator for all stories may have been an error. In a few of the stories the narrator simply didn't fit the narrative for me. His voice is quite unique and for some of the stories I couldn't think of a better voice. That was not universally the case and in a couple stories it really pulled me out of the story.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Damita Linn Pearson
  • 09-07-21

The end?

It is always a sad event coming to the end of a book. Each story leaves me hungry for the next one.

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  • Bastion Drake
  • 29-06-21

From a Discerning Lovecraft Fan.

This is definitely an above average Cthulhu mythos collection. Most importantly, it's not just within the mythos but Lovecraftian as well, that is to say you won't be seeing Cthulhu playing the part of a grizzled detective on the streets of New York getting up to all kinds of Scooby-Dooesque adventures (not in most of the stories at least). These are legitimate mythos stories but what made this volume special was the follow-up analysis of each entity. If you're an information vampire, you're going to love these sections. Narration wasn't particularly good.

1. Call the Name (Adam Nevill) (Cthulhu): Great in concept but overall it was far too slow paced and underwhelming. Did they put this one first because it was Cthulhu themed? This was a rough start to the collection.

2. The Dark Gates: This was a poor choice for second story. It does a great job of setting a tone for the collection, but that tone is a bit wonky and incompatible with most of the rest of the stories here. It appears to be an excerpt from the author's own series which results in an uncomfortable familiarity with its characters. To its credit, it is a full story but not a particularly good one and its more in the category of action than Lovecraftian.

3. We Smoke the Northern Lights (Azathoth): Was this another excerpt? This one was considerably more interesting than the first two but confusing and goes in two directions, corporate dystopia and Lovecraftian science fiction. This makes me suspect that this is some kind of side adventure for another series, which really doesn't belong in a short story collection. What's worse is that it's not even a proper mythos story, the entity involved just reminds the protagonist of Azathoth because he read H.P. Lovecraft. I have to give this a thumbs down despite its interesting elements.

4. Tetotalrayne? (Bentley Little) (Nyarlethotep): After the first three, this was a major spike in quality. It is an exceptional tale of Nyarlathotep written in true Lovecraftian fashion that directly expands upon the mythos. You may want to skip the first three and start here.

5. The Doors that Never Close and the Doors that Are Always Open (David Liss) (Shub-Niggorath): This one was good, the author managed to keep me entertained despite the lack of excitement in the events of the story, a credit to good writing.

6. The Apotheosis of a Rodeo Clown (Tsathoggua) (Brett Talley): Great atmosphere and very entertaining but the issue of morality is frustrating. As far as I'm concerned the protagonist is the most malign individual in a story of murderous cultists and man-eating monsters. This is despite the clown's insinuation that he is a hero, whether or not the author failed to fully evaluate the character's actions or intended his champion to be misaligned, is unknown to me. Also, I can't call this a true mythos story because the god behaves like one of traditional mythology, appearing and speaking directly to (and coherently with) the protagonist.

7. Rattled (Douglas Wayne) (Yig): Another great mythos story. Like most (all?) good mythos stories the deity does not make a direct appearance but is felt through his influence on humanity.

8. In Their Presence (James A Moore, Christopher Golden) (Migo): Very good but I don't have anything to say about it that I haven't said earlier.

9. Dream a Little Dream of Me (Jonathan Maberry) (Night Gaunts): This story is misplaced in this collection. I enjoyed it well enough. Well written and entertaining, it is an excerpt from a series featuring a werewolf detective. It is set firmly in the Cthulhu mythos but not Lovecraftian. I understand why the editor went for it. The story prominently features the night gaunt species and is written by a famous author, real shiny bait.

10. In the Mad Mountains (Joe Landsdale) (Elder Things): Probably my favorite of the lot. Not only is this one exciting and fascinating but it successfully expands upon the original while maintaining quality and continuity. Author probably could have come up with a better title though...

11. A Dying of the Light (Rachel Caine) (The Great Race): This one slightly recasts the Great Race from their mostly neutral morality into that of either benign or malign (I won't tell you which because that may be a spoiler) but is otherwise a true quality mythos story.

12. Down, Deep Down, Below the Waves (Seanan McGuire) (Dagon): McGuire perfectly captures the essence of Insmouth and expands upon it in a unique and intriguing storyline. I'm always worried about a story featuring Insmouth, the millennials have a habit of perverting the Deep Ones into innocent victims to spite Lovecraft's xenophobia – To them: A misunderstood victimized people is great subject matter – write your own mythos.

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  • Crom and Ymir
  • 13-05-21

A Worthy Anthology

After listening to a few horrendous compilations whose authors apparently think the Cthulhu Mythos is a place meant for light hearted heroism, comedy and protagonists with the personalities of cartoon characters, this book was a welcome relief. These are (except for a couple) proper Lovecraftian tales.

The narrator does a very poor job, but luckily the writing is good enough that the book is still worth listening to.