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The Field of Blood

Violence in Congress and the Road to Civil War
Narrated by: Joanne B. Freeman
Length: 11 hrs and 19 mins
Categories: History, American
4.5 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Summary

This program is read by the author.

The previously untold story of the violence in Congress that helped spark the Civil War 

In The Field of Blood, Joanne B. Freeman recovers the long-lost story of physical violence on the floor of the US Congress. Drawing on an extraordinary range of sources, she shows that the Capitol was rife with conflict in the decades before the Civil War. Legislative sessions were often punctuated by mortal threats, canings, flipped desks, and all-out slugfests. When debate broke down, congressmen drew pistols and waved Bowie knives. One representative even killed another in a duel. Many were beaten and bullied in an attempt to intimidate them into compliance, particularly on the issue of slavery. 

These fights didn’t happen in a vacuum. Freeman’s dramatic accounts of brawls and thrashings tell a larger story of how fisticuffs and journalism, and the powerful emotions they elicited, raised tensions between North and South and led toward war. In the process, she brings the antebellum Congress to life, revealing its rough realities - the feel, sense, and sound of it - as well as its nation-shaping import. 

Funny, tragic, and rivetingly told, The Field of Blood offers a front-row view of congressional mayhem and sheds new light on the careers of John Quincy Adams, Henry Clay, and other luminaries, as well as introducing a host of lesser-known but no less fascinating men. The result is a fresh understanding of the workings of American democracy and the bonds of Union on the eve of their greatest peril. 

©2018 Joanne B. Freeman (P)2018 Macmillan Audio

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Profile Image for P. Cardella
  • P. Cardella
  • 27-09-18

fascinating look at an untold aspect of US.history

Think you know it all about US History? Antebellum America? The causes of the Civil War? Then you need to read this book because you don't. Thirty years of US history told from very personal perspectives, especially a key figure in U.S. history you've never heard of but have read about and interacted with his usually unnamed contributions. A fascinating book read by the author, a real treat.

8 people found this helpful

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  • kirk m. yates
  • 30-10-18

Congress is full of immature children

This book is an amazing look into the real day to day conflicts that were inherent to the congressional going’s on of the 1800s. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

4 people found this helpful

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  • William R. Todd-Mancillas (Name includes hyphen and camptalized M)
  • 22-03-19

Civil Servants Were During the 19th Cent. Violent

Narration: Clear, although a bit sing songie.

Content: I think an abbreviated edition would be more worth one's while. I got a bit bored half way through the book because the violence was so repetitive. One duel or fight seemed like all the rest.

Still, an important view of the hostility among Representatives and Senators during the 19th Century.

Worthwhile.

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  • michael
  • 18-12-18

Use of BB French as the lens was captivating

History books in the audio form can get tedious. The detail and citations often muddy up the important events and make listening more of a chore. Dr. Freeman's use of Benjamin Brown French's accounts of the period throughout the book eliminated that issue. I was invested in his journey and through that journey I learned so much about how our nations government worked (or didn't) in the run up to the Civil War. The 11+ hours of this book flew by.

Dr. Freeman's decision to read the book herself was also a really good call. Her performance exuded her excitement for the material in a way that a professional voice talent would have to work very hard to replicate.

I can't recommend it highly enough. Wonderful!

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  • Trevor Alm
  • 04-12-18

Having the author narrate adds something<br />

Excellent book. Writing style, research, narration, all great. I really enjoyed the author reading it herself. Many times throughout the book one gets the feeling that she is holding back a chuckle at a particularly absurd incident. This closeness to the text is really refreshing and adds to the experience of listening. I am definitely going to look into her other works after listening to this one.

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  • Omar
  • 28-10-18

informative, thought provoking, great narrator

this book is a very thought provoking and realistic look at our nation and capital hill pre civil war. it's good to see that bullying, smack talk, and fighting were not something new to.comhress that we have to worry about
Congress wasn't always this high and mighty place it has become and the narrator's enthusiasm makes the reading of the book that much more intriguing and her dearth of knowledge of the subject matter.

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  • Narmer
  • 21-10-18

Fabulous work read by the author

Loved this book for so many reasons. Through a cast of colorful characters from both the North and South, the author confronts the white-washed version of the antebellum US Congress and reveals the tobacco and blood stained carpets beneath. The author nicely illustrates the complicated political scene of the antebellum period, outlining how violence, manhood, sectionalism, and politics intersected. Engagingly read by the author herself, this title was enjoyable from start to finish. Highly recommend.

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  • dcreader
  • 18-10-18

Fantastic account of violence in the pre Civil War

A fascinating account of how violence shaped Congressional politics before the Civil War. Excellently read by the author. Highly recommended.

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  • Claire
  • 17-10-18

Excellent book, chillingly relevant

I highly recommend this book to anyone seeking greater understanding of our current political moment. I love how the author explores the various facets and accelerators of disunion, all inextricably linked. The lead up to the Civil War is so often reduced to “the fight over slavery”. This book brilliantly details how that fight manifested physically in Congress, and how that hostility influenced and was influenced by public opinion/technological changes/landmark societal events.

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  • FarmBoy
  • 11-10-18

Truly exceptional

This is an extraordinary work of history— made more exceptional by the fact that it makes accessible a period of American history that’s often relegated to a footnote. In my view, this is the best accessible piece of scholarship since James McPherson‘s Battle Cry of Freedom. Professor Freeman not only plumbs the depths of primary sources to assemble a lucid picture of a volatile political and popular culture— and one in which a hidebound but vocal minority manages to impose its will on the majority’s for several decades, though with tragic consequences for the nation—she does it in a way that holds up a mirror to our own era. READ IT.

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