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Summary

'The difference between a good detective and a successful criminal is paper thin' - CID induction lecture'

Welcome to the Criminal Investigation Department, aka the Crime Factory. Where the cops take and sell drugs (or steal them from the police storeroom); where they fit up, 'verbal' and harrass criminals, fight each other, drink-drive, abuse search warrants, have sex with sources, stab one another in the back (metaphorically), put each other under surveillance; abuse every aspect of their power, take bribes, cover up scandals, massage crime stats, and leak sensitive information to the The Crime Factory. Where they perform life-saving medical care in the street, comfort people as they die, deal with gruesome suicides and murders as first-on-scene, attend cot-death post-mortems, examine rotting dead junkies for signs of murder, watch guilty rapists and paedophiles walk free, fight drunk soldiers, gypsies and various psychotic individuals, go undercover to catch scumbags who force-feed them crack, find missing children, arrest thieves, muggers, dealers, rapists and murderers…The Crime Factory. It's enough to drive anyone insane.

The first book of its kind, this is the unforgettable and explosive true story of what life is really like as a police detective in the twenty-first century. Officer 'A' spent twelve years as a police officer, ten of which were as a CID detective. He resigned from the police in April 2010 and currently consults in private security and co-owns a successful business.

©2012 Andy Jennings (P)2013 Audible Ltd

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Very true and moving

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes I would, having been married to a Policeman and detective, I know just how shockingly true this book is.

What did you like best about this story?

The very real portrayal of the police establishment, hierarchy etc plus the continued deterioration of the public's respect for the police in general and as human beings in particular.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

The same as the book title.

Any additional comments?

Having a certain understanding, the initial descriptions of the rank and file of the Police force made me laugh a lot, the last chapters dealing with the Authors complete breakdown was very touching and true and happens to so many of those in the front lines. I feel comments regarding the lack of acknowledgement by the powers that be to be justified.I found this book a fascinating read. The narrator is also excellent.

14 people found this helpful

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Loved it!

What did you like most about The Crime Factory?

It is an accurate picture of policing today and the highs and lows it contains. I may have enjoyed it more than most as I have a recent Police background but I think it could also be enjoyed by others.

It is obvious that Damien McIntyre (Officer A) still has a real axe to grind against Surrey but it is a real rollercoaster of a story. I think the issues of PTSD and burnout are relevant to anyone on a high pressure job environment and there are plenty of those inside and outside the Police.

What other book might you compare The Crime Factory to, and why?

Haven't read anything like this before.

Which character – as performed by Damian Lynch – was your favourite?

It is non-fiction so this question isn't relevant but Mr Lynch reads it well and is easy on the ears.

If you made a film of this book, what would be the tag line be?

Warm Fuzz

Any additional comments?

I bought it for a couple of quid in the sale and definitely would never have selected it otherwise. I would have missed a treat. If you like autobiographies written by 'real' people as opposed to celebrities then I recommend you buy this. If you are thinking about going into the Police service then this should be required reading.

The moral of the story - watch what you say out loud at work.

15 people found this helpful

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A Call for Empathy

Even though this is just one man's true story I think it would prove very interesting to most readers of detective fiction. On the one hand the author is very keen to make points about real life being unlike detective fiction in the way that crimes are solved. On the other it is sadly clear that many of the fictional stereotypes are rooted in at least this ex-copper's reality.

The crippling hours, the lack of empathy from senior management, the under-funding and of course the crippling effects of so-called progressive management techniques. Anyone who has worked in a big company knows that when you treat something that takes a variety of approaches and skills with the factory model you merely end up creating illusions of productivity and progress. Give a senior manager a simple set of numbers to look after and that's it, any hope of getting genuine leadership vanishes as the targets replace common sense and good priorities.

The book itself is written simply and moves along at a good pace, it covers a number of years and not one but two countries. The differences between the Australian and UK police forces at the time are stark and fascinating. The narration by Damian Lynch is very sympathetic to the subject and strikes what feels likes an authentic tone including both the desperation and the dark humour which is spread through the book.

I also think that anyone with strong feelings about our police force should read this, regardless of which direction those feelings take. Probably most would gain at least a little empathy with the rank and file officers though maybe not the institutions themselves. It is just one man's story of course and written after a bad experience with a couple of employers but it highlights the pressures and difficulties we put our public servants under.

Maybe it could help engender a little more understanding all round.

15 people found this helpful

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Been there - Done that - Spot on

I've been in the exact position as officer 'A'. He has the situation absolutely spot on - how senior officers have their offences brushed under the carpet whilst treating the rank and file like something they trod in.

Very well worth reading

4 people found this helpful

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Straight off the 'crime' conveyor belt

I am not a stranger to the Crime/True Crime genre and have spent years reading books from both view points of the criminal world.

Having read the summary, I decided I'd purchase this book as it is exactly the sort I enjoy and was expecting something in the same vein as The Jigsaw Man by Paul Britton, etc. Unfortunately, I was left disappointed and could not have been further from the truth.

The more the book progressed, the more I thought that I was listening to a stereotypical cop story detailing the trials and tribulations of an overworked, underpaid police (insert mid-level rank position here) battling with work/life balances and struggles.
Character-to-character dialogue was embarrassing and uncomfortable - it felt as though I was sitting through a pilot episode of The Bill. To top it off, I found a lot of the takes on certain accents excruciatingly embarrassing to listen to and at certain points in the book I would simply switch off because I couldn't take it seriously.
Narrative was predictable and underwhelming. Writing style seemed very basic and overall, poor.

I understand that this was a book based on the true account of Officer A and his struggles with being part of the Police but I'm left wondering: what was the end goal? Was this to raise awareness of mental health issues within the Police Force? Was this to shine a light on corruption? Yes, it was to tell us his story but I felt no attempt from the writer to guide readers to build an affinity to the main character or if there was one, it didn't work. On this basis alone I am left unsure what the writer wanted to evoke aside from indifference.

Officer A has my sympathies for the troubles he has faced but this book could have been so much more if they had dared to try to break the mould.

3 people found this helpful

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so this is real police work

A cracking good read. Nothing in it surprised me but then i didn't expect it to. It's not a book for the faint0hearted or for those who'd prefer to keep their heads buried in the sand. it pulls no punches at all but then doesn't attempt to justify anything that goes on. It simply points out the fact as the author sees them and leave us to judge for ourselves if he's telling the truth or not. I think he is telling the truth and that something should be done about it. I wouldn't do his job for anything in the world but I'm sure glad somebody takes the risk of losing his sanity to do it.

The narator did a fairly good job of this book though some of the acdents are a mite inaccurate and it's hard to know what he's trying to sound like or who. That apart I'd recommend this book to anyone who just wants to see policing like it is and not listen to all the rubbish we're told in the press or by our politicians.

Happy reading

6 people found this helpful

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A 5 star must listen!

I read this book a few years ago and enjoyed it a lot.... this time with lots of driving I chose to listen to it.... the narrator brought this book to life, what was a brilliant hard hitting account of this officers life become a fantastic listen.
5 stars all the way!

2 people found this helpful

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Fascinating Insight

Would you listen to The Crime Factory again? Why?

I couldn't stop listening to this, the stories he tells are as gritty and interesting as any good fiction but so insightful and shocking when you remind yourself it is real life. I know we are obviously only hearing it from his point of view but felt a great empathy with the writer by the end with everything he went through and found myself really hoping he is happy and successful now. Also, I absolutely loved the narration - it sounded so completely genuine and heartfelt I had to double check that the author wasn't reading it himself as was convinced it had to be him!

2 people found this helpful

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Great read

As an ex police officer who also suffered from depression and ptsd.
I can totally understand how he feels.

the job s crap and no back up from powers that be.
I hope you feel better now.

1 person found this helpful

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true story

loved this book,and a really good narrator too.Makes you understand crime and the after effects it has on our coppers.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Tim
  • 15-10-17

Interesting insight..

Lots of mini stories which do a good job delving into the lives of police officers, while highlighting the double standards and loyalty of the force. It was an interesting book, which lacked substance at times and over delivered at others. Worth a listen for sure..