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Summary

The murders, the hidden millions and MI6's secret. The real truth about Pablo Escobar.

Pablo Escobar was the most notorious drug lord the world has ever seen. He became one of the 10 richest men on the planet and controlled 80 per cent of the global cocaine trade before he was shot dead in 1993. This is the long-awaited autobiography of his eldest son, Roberto Sendoya Escobar.

His story opens with two helicopter gunships, filled with heavily armed Colombian special forces personnel led by an MI6 agent, flying into a small village on the outskirts of Bogota in Colombia. The secret mission to recover a stolen cash hoard culminates in a bloody shoot-out with a group of young Pablo Escobar’s violent gangsters. Several of the men escape, including the young Escobar. 

As the dust settles in the house, only a little baby is left alive. His distressing cries can be heard as his young mother lies dead beside him. That baby is the author, Roberto Sendoya Escobar. In a bizarre twist of fate, the top MI6 agent who led the mission takes pity on the child and, eventually, ends up adopting him. 

Over the years, during his rise to prominence as the most powerful drug lord the world has ever known, Pablo Escobar tries, repeatedly, to kidnap his son. Flanked by his trusty bodyguards, the child, unaware of his true identity, is allowed regular meetings with Escobar, and it becomes apparent that the British government is working covertly with the gangster in an attempt to control the money laundering and drug trades. 

Life becomes so dangerous, however, that the author is packed off from the family mansion in Bogota to an English public school. Many years later in England, as Roberto’s adopted father lies dying in hospital, he hands his son a coded piece of paper which, he says, reveals the secret hiding place of the 'Escobar missing millions' the world has been searching for! The code is published in this book for the first time.

©2021 Roberto Sendoya Escobar (P)2021 Boldwood Books Ltd

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A great true-life story with many twists.

I thoroughly enjoyed listening to this book which puts some light on what it must’ve been like to grow up behind the dangers of living in South & Central America from the sixties to the eighties. I would recommend anyone who has an interest in the drug cartels of Columbia to read this book, which gives a different background to the situation.

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  • Brooke Gonzalez
  • 06-06-21

entertaining story, should be labeled fiction

I made the mistake of purchasing this on a whim and realized immediately after pressing play that it wasn't what I bargained for, but I had a long drive ahead of me, so I gave it a fair chance.

The story is captivating and easy to follow, and it reads like an ordinary memoir, except for being a little too improbable and theatrical to be believed. Even with limited knowledge of the infamous drug lord, the author's grandiose retellings are blatantly dubious, like how he asserts that he was 3 years younger than his peers beginning primary school, like that's even possible without being singled out and recognized as a prodigy.

It doesn't take a lot of digging to uncover that most of his claims are unsubstantiated or just plain false. I did enjoy the story but I probably wouldn't have bothered with it if it were appropriately categorized as historical fiction.