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Summary

In this controversial new audiobook, the author offers a thought-provoking critique of educational orthodoxy. Drawing on her recent experience of teaching in challenging schools, she shows, through a wide range of examples and case studies, just how much classroom practice contradicts basic scientific principles. She examines seven widely held beliefs which are holding back pupils and teachers:

  • Facts prevent understanding.
  • Teacher-led instruction is passive.
  • The 21st century fundamentally changes everything.
  • You can always just look it up.
  • We should teach transferable skills.
  • Projects and activities are the best way to learn.
  • Teaching knowledge is indoctrination.

In each accessible and engaging chapter, the author sets out the theory of each myth, considers its practical implications and shows the worrying prevalence of such practice. Then, she explains exactly why it is a myth, with reference to the principles of modern cognitive science.

©2014 Daisy Christodoulou (P)2019 W.F. Howes Ltd

What listeners say about Seven Myths About Education

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Great book, Good narration

Great book, Good narration. Sometimes I think it would have been handy to have the text so I could easily re-read parts.. easier for me to digest slowly I think. All quotes are read out by narrator in different voice so quite easy to tell what's going on.

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Interesting arguments.

some great points made. Narrator voice did grate quite a bit for me whilst driving. Might be a personal thing, but this made it a challenge to complete the audio. Because it is a good book, I did indeed complete it and will probably get the text version to read again.

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a bit of a polemic against straw men

While there are some truths in the book, there are a lot of straw men too. For example in Bloom's Taxonomy of learning, "knowledge" is the bottom tier, but not because of being less important, but rather that it is the essential foundation.

Nonetheless, as someone who has clashed with the Educationalist Establishment myself, it is quite good to see it get a bit of a bashing.

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interesting book but sometimes unfair critique

whilst the author does well to debunk some of the long standing myths currently taken for granted in the education realm, she often falls into similar dogmatic positions as the ones she rightly critiques. Her stance on and harsh criticism of Freire is at the very least erroneous and unfair. The learning of facts and knowledge, as the author points, is fundamental in education and so are the processes of learning and skills building. Nonetheless, the book does a good job in denouncing the current trend in education that focuses on so called 21st century skills at the expense of fact and knowledge learning. a good read

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Time for the pendulum to swing back....

....to the middle. Both skills and knowledge are essential and Christodoulou shows how learning facts is the vehicle to learning skills. No one ever said that teaching was easy. A great book

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  • Thucydides
  • 29-03-20

A must read for teachers, citizens, parents

This book has been characterized as a strawman attack. Not true. it presents the Post-modern constructivist side of the latest education fads so convincingly that I wonder who could possible disagree. Then she destroys me. She uses good research and compelling examples to cause me to reevaluate almost everything I learned in teacher's college.

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