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Summary

It is 1958 and the France's first nuclear submarine, Plongeur. leaves port for the first of its sea trials. On board, gathered together for the first time, one of the Navy's most experienced captains and a tiny skeleton crew of sailors, engineers and scientists.

The Plongeur makes her first dive and goes down, and down and down... Out of control, the submarine plummets to a depth where the pressure will crush her hull, killing everyone on board, and beyond.The pressure builds, the hull protests, the crew prepare for death, the boat reaches the bottom of the sea and finds...nothing.

Her final dive continues, the pressure begins to relent, but the depth gauge is useless. They have gone miles down. Hundreds of miles, thousands...And so it goes on. And on board the crew succumb to madness, betrayal, religious mania and murder.

Has the Plongeur left the limits of our world and gone elsewhere?

©2014 Adam Roberts (P)2014 Macmillan Audio

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Plumbing the cosmic depths

Would you listen to Twenty Trillion Leagues Under the Sea again? Why?

No, but only because Ii don't re - read

What other book might you compare Twenty Trillion Leagues Under the Sea to, and why?

Apart from the obvious, Swiftly by the same author

Which scene did you most enjoy?

Without spoilers, when a death occurs!

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Er... no

Any additional comments?

I've enjoyed a few of Roberts books - apart from the fantastic Yellow Blue Tibia they all tend to be flawed masterpieces - strong beginning and middle but weak in the end. As ever, the good bits are SO good you can forgive this with this book. Sure there's plot holes a plenty and it does go on a bit but it's a cracking tale, nicely narrated ( although the Indian voices are a bit dodgy in 2015 !). Very enjoyable.