Regular price: £22.99

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
OR
In Basket

Summary

Marooned in outer space after an attack on his ship, Nomad, Gulliver Foyle lives to obsessively pursue the crew of a rescue vessel that had intended to leave him to die.

When it comes to pop culture, Alfred Bester (1913-1987) is something of an unsung hero. He wrote radio scripts, screenplays, and comic books (in which capacity he created the original Green Lantern Oath). But Bester is best known for his science fiction novels, and The Stars My Destination may be his finest creation. With its sly potshotting at corporate skullduggery, The Stars My Destination seems utterly contemporary, and has maintained its status as an underground classic for over 50 years.

©1956 Alfred Bester; copyright renewed 1984 by Alfred Bester; special restored text of this edition copyright 1996 by the Estate of Alfred Bester; Introduction copyright 1996 by Neil Gaiman (P)2017 Tantor

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    11
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    9
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    1
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    11
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
No Reviews are Available
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Frederick
  • 26-03-18

Magnificent

Bester is my favorite Science Fiction writer. I first read this book more than thirty years ago and Instead of aging Bester’s prose just gets better and better. His necessary interpretation or 300 years going forward is entertaining and clever.
The narration is superb and it adds to the enjoyment rather than distracts.

51 of 53 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • charles watkins
  • 19-02-18

STILL AMAZINGLY GOOD AFTER 62 YEARS

A Science Fiction classic by anyone's standards! A 25th century Count of Monte Christo, the classic story of revenge that Alfred Bester used for inspiration to write what was originally titled Tiger Tiger. I first read the Stars My Destination in 1957 at the age of 7 and was thunderstruck even at that young age. I've continued to re read it every year or two since and it never loses its ability to thrill me. When I saw the audio version available for the first time I was filled with excitement and a bit of trepidation. How would a narrator interpret the characters I knew so well after reading this story 40 times or more over six decades? I practically know the dialogue by heart. Listening was an interesting experience. The narrator certainly did not sound like what I had imagined the characters sounding like. But how could anyone? After a bit I got used to his voice(s) and overall I found the audio version of this amazing story well worth the listen. Listen to it with an open mind and remember that it was written in the mid 1950s when the average person's understanding of the universe and space travel was not what it is today. One of my favorite books of all time.

76 of 81 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • D. Erdman
  • 17-06-18

A Good Enough Read...But Mercilessly Stolen from Dumas

I enjoyed this book and will keep it in my collection. However, it is painfully obvious that the entire storyline is ripped from The Count of Monte Cristo. In virtually every plot development. He’s altered it to be, what I’d call in today’s world, “Steam Punk”. But it is Cristo all the way.

More frustrating than the copied plot, was the inconsistent character reactions. A couple of the characters - particularly the women - are written to behave in embarrassingly contradictory ways...within sentences. If this is a reflection of 50’s sexism or just poor writing is up to you. He does refer to an African-American with a prejudiced word (not the one you’re thinking) which does show its age.

Nevertheless, I found myself engrossed at several points in the book and listened eagerly to the conclusion within one week. The fact it was written more than 50 years ago and still is so readable does give it credit...though perhaps more to Alexander Dumas than to Mr. Bester.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Celeste Albers
  • 24-06-18

Tiger Tiger

What a delight! Yes, it’s dated but that doesn’t diminish the enjoyment at all. Masterfully performed by Gerald Doyle; I’m sure to return to this one.
Life’s a freak!!

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Miriam Dady
  • 23-06-18

So THAT'S why 'Burning Man' is Burning Man!

Late 50's pulp Sci-Fi is not really my cup of tea so, in all fairness, my rating would have been higher for this book if the genre was a favorite.
The story begins when a desire for revenge is introduced in this "common man" brute [Gully Foyle] who, until this event only possesses a desire for survival. That catalyst forces Gully to achieve wealth, stature, education, love; but he never waivers from his purpose, until the end... Until the Burning Man convinces him that all power, including revenge & destruction, should belong to the common man.
A worthy listen.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Maximus
  • 19-06-18

completely stunned and completely pleased!

best credit I've spent on Audible in a long time. this book gets more relevant as it ages. it reminds me of the Earth Abides, and it's grand storyline, its reach and its character richness.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Gary Stanford
  • 21-12-17

The Count of MonteCristo with teleportation

A cyclical view of humanity, from a cyclical person bent on revenge, no matter the cost. Interesting reading, if the mechanics of plot supercede the, probably unknown at the time, mechanics of current spacial understanding. Only mildly tinged with the social views of the time, more in favor of maintaining the Dumas feel than to be politic.

8/10, will read again.

15 of 22 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Amanda
  • 16-07-18

Very anachronistic

unique story ruined by extreme misogyny, ie rape, forcing women into sexual slavery all casually thrown in with no condemnation. Stopped reading half way through.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Michael G Kurilla
  • 10-07-18

Timeless classic

Alfred Bester's The Stars my Destination is classic sci-fi from the 1950's that stands the test of time. Set far into the future, the 25th century, humans have settled the solar system out to Neptune. Along the way, jaunting was discovered which involves personal teleportation over distances up to 1000 miles. The resulting impact on society and the economy results in conflict between the inner and outer system. Gully Foyle is a nondescript mechanic 3rd class on a freighter that is the sole survivor of some unknown disaster. When his emergency beacon is ignored, he is driven by revenge to hunt down the perpetrators. At the same time, Foyle is pursued by many for the secrets the freighter was carrying of which he is unaware.

Bester employs many sci-fi elements with jaunting or personal teleportation being a major aspect. Space travel is routine with colonization extending out to a moon of Neptune. Inner versus outer system conflict mirrors the cold war situation at the time. Telepathy is also common with an unusual one way telepath who can only transmit. The special substance pyre is some sort of superweapon akin to a fusion bomb. Bester also creates unique social groups such a cargo cult living on an asteroid fashioned with salvaged spacecraft and a monkish aesthetic cult that severs all sensory nerves . Finally Bester explores long range teleportation with relativistic implications.

The narration is excellent with a wide range of characters with good distinction. Pacing and mood are well aligned with the plot and the voice of Gully is spot on. Even in the 25th century, this story will not be dated.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Marcos Ibarguen
  • 07-07-18

My first SF read still holds up...

First off, let’s be clear about one thing: the title of this book is “Tiger! Tiger!”, OK? OK. Regardless of its various publishing incarnations, that’s the title I first read it under, and for me it’s the TRUE title of the book.. Anyway, in terms of its importance to SF overall, this book should rate an A+. Also in terms of its importance to ME… A+. This was after all the first adult SF novel I ever read, and the reason I became an SF fan and wannabe SF writer. This is the wellspring! And it does hold up pretty well after 7 decades, much better than many another SF “classic,” so I can’t complain. But I CAN quibble! Bester did an amazing job of avoiding technological obsolescence by keeping the tech stuff vague. He also did a fairly good job of avoiding sociological obsolescence by having a good reason why gender inequality should still exist in the 25th century, but reading this book in the “me too” era makes it impossible to overlook Gully Foyle’s rape of Robin Wednesbury. That said, this book still stands as a classic in a lot of ways. It is one of the best novels to explore the concept of obsessive revenge, in any genre. It is an excellent piece of world-building – exploring the societal impact of “what if all of us could teleport” in a brilliant way. And it’s just a fine piece of action story-telling, with a killer pace and not one word wasted. If a 2018 writer had this many incredibly good ideas in his head, this novel would be triple the length! And while I would actually have liked more development of certain ideas, the literary courage involved in not over-pumping this book deserves admiration, even today. So… I loved the re-read and I am happy to have spent an Audible credit on this, especially given that I now understand that in my teens I did NOT truly understand the ending! But I do need to admit that it is in no way perfect or timeless. Some (though surprisingly not that much) of the dialog is dated, the sex role stuff is antiquated, and so on. The surprise for me was to find some of the action downright clunky. The best example was when the traitorous lawyer Sheffield – who had been carefully prepped to capture Foyle by his Outer Satellites masters – completely failed to recognize Foyle when the man walked into his office. What – they don’t have cameras in the 25th century??? Anyway... quibbles are quibbles. This is still a great book, a seminal piece of SF, and a classic piece of cyberpunk written 40 years before cyberpunk existed! So… still a classic? Yep.