Regular price: £32.89

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
OR
In Basket

Summary

The desert planet Arrakis, called Dune, has been destroyed. Now, the Bene Gesserit, heirs to Dune's power, have colonized a green world - and are tuning it into a desert, mile by scorched mile.

Chapterhouse Dune is the last book Frank Herbert wrote before his death and a stunning climax to the epic Dune legend that will live on forever.

Don't miss other titles in the Dune series.
©1985 Frank Herbert (P)2009 Macmillan Audio

Critic reviews

"Compelling...A worthy addition to this durable and deservedly popular series." ( The New York Times)

More from the same

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    160
  • 4 Stars
    77
  • 3 Stars
    27
  • 2 Stars
    8
  • 1 Stars
    2

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    105
  • 4 Stars
    54
  • 3 Stars
    15
  • 2 Stars
    3
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    114
  • 4 Stars
    44
  • 3 Stars
    16
  • 2 Stars
    6
  • 1 Stars
    2
Sort by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Compelling Socio-Political fantasy drama

Dune was a magnificent book; but it pales in comparison with the final two books in the Frank Herbert timeline - Heretics of Dune and Chapterhouse Dune.

These two books stand together and follow on one from the other. The story focuses around the struggle of the Bene Gesserit (post Dune), the race to establish a supply of melange and a new threat that has merged from the scattering.

The best part about these books is the ingenious social insight that Frank Herbert displayed as he explored principles of power, control, and minority rule. He teaches through the story also - principles of a supply and demand economy, different political and social structures, ecology....

The Saga could not have finished in a finer way. The Author's family should be very proud of this accomplishment because it is far more than a compelling story.

11 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Worth a revisit

Having read the Dune series years ago I wanted to re-visit my favorite book, Chapterhouse. This installment focuses on the Bene Gesserit with all their political scheming. The multiple narrators really helps make this audio book version come to life. Overall I was not disappointed.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

excellent

some of the narrator's had different ways of pronouncing some words commonly used in the story, found this a little jarring. but ultimately it was excellent.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

spoiled by annoying switches between readers

too many readers with different voices and pronunciations ruined the experience for me- very annoying

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Clever story. Interesting ideas.

Cloning and cybernetics and the continuation of the human race.

If each cell held consciousness, you could go back to the origin of the race.

Not sure it needed three narrators, but fine.

I look forward to reading the follow on novels by Brian Herbert and Kevin Anderson.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Charles
  • Peterborough, United Kingdom
  • 02-08-17

Some long winded passages serving no great purpose but a great ending to the saga

The female narrator was really irritating with daft intonation, consistent wrong emphases and different name pronunciations to the wonderful main narrator of the other books.
The whole saga generally very enjoyable.
Thanks Frank!

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Inconsistent narration

The only problem with this recording is the inconsistent standard of narration. It's as if the audio recording lacked the clear vision of a single producer/director. There were contradictory pronunciations of Herber's chatacter's names, races, places and technology which was quite irritating.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

The last one...

Loved it. I have all the Dune saga on audio and I love them all.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

Great finish

Really great story that kept me interested throughout. My only gripe is that the narrators pronounce things so differently. At times I thought they were introducing a new character but then realised that it was Morton and Kellgren interpreting the names entirely differently. I have to say the ending 2 chapters left so many questions. I'm happy though

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Pronunciation..

I just wish the readers could agree on using the same pronunciations.
Other than that I have loved them all from start to finish. Great story.

Sort by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • chris
  • 23-05-14

Great Story! Horrible way to compile a narration.

I love the story. I been reading all the dune series that Frank Herbert wrote and been doing the audio books too. The worst narration was Dune Messiah. This narration has the same problems as Dune Messiah. Instead of using differ narrators for differ characters they just had them all narrate random chapters. Like they are all practicing narrating and not taking this one seriously. A message to whoever produces this audio book: We do not want random narrations that are disjointed. We want a male narrator doing male voices and a female one doing the female voices. Quit messing up our audio books. These narrators are great but who ever produced this is dumb as all can be.

14 of 17 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Loren A Goodwin
  • 06-08-12

Unchallenged Series Finale

Have read this book many times along with the rest of the Dune Series. First time listen on the audio format and all of the books were great. Could have done with out the female narrator of Chapterhouse however. She needs some serious work on tonality and timing. Other than that small irritation all was splendid!

6 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Dwaine R. Wheeler
  • 30-08-15

Next book please.... Oops. The end.

Third times a charm. I have made through the whole series 3 times. This one leaves you wanting the whole story... Another 10,000 years please.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Doug D. Eigsti
  • 09-12-14

…..Bucket list complete.....

Back in the day I read the original DUNE and then followed with DUNE MESSIAH and CHILDREN OF DUNE, but then I stopped because I didn't like the direction the series was going. Over the intervening years I kept hearing high praise for the rest of the series. I just wasn't motivated enough to undertake reading all six books. But now that they are available on Audio I thought I would give it a try. After all I had been richly rewarded in a similar situation involving the works of Neal Stephenson. (I had avoided The Baroque Cycle after loving Snowcrash but disliking The Diamond Age) So, in the case of the Dune novels I felt compelled to check off this nagging omission from my bucket list. I was hopefully expecting a buried treasure. Sadly, my original estimation was confirmed. The original DUNE is wonderful and inventive, fresh and new. The balance of the Dune novels are slow plodding—focused too much on fanciful, imagined philosophy. The second book, DUNE MESSIAH, reads like an outline—just advancing the plot so the third, CHILDREN OF DUNE can be told. This third book has some mildly interesting characters and promises a Space Opera scale expansion of the story for the remaining novels. The fourth, GOD EMPEROR OF DUNE, documents the tyrannical reign of human-turned-worm Leto II but does not make good use of the vast scale of a multiple-planet empire. The creepy giant larvae-like emperor, and his entire dialog, seems less then majestic or oppressive, as later recollections will portray his reign. The idea is there but the execution is lacking. The next, HERETICS OF DUNE, advances the plot but leaves much to be desired when it comes to holding my interest; which it could have done with more interesting people or with witty dialog (Again the reader is referred to The Baroque Cycle). And this last novel is no improvement. Mercifully, Frank Herbert ended his series with CHAPTERHOUSE DUNE. This last novel has the same feel as the previous two books. I did not like it. And unless someone can convince me that the other Dune books, written by Frank Herbert’s son are of a completely different quality, my exploration of Dune is at an end.

As a public service I can say that if you enjoy exploring the outlining of a future society based on treachery and long range planning—but without fleshing out the characters or establishing an engaging storyline, then the last five Dune novels may be for you. My chief complaint is that the new characters which necessarily populate the later novels are just not very interesting. I was never made to care about them and so had a hard time following their concerns.

I sympathize with the plight of the narrators. The dissertation-like nature of the text as a sociological treatise demands a slow monotone reading, and the narrators faithfully comply.

7 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • D. Wright
  • 01-07-14

Did the narrators talk to each other?

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

The book would only make sense to someone who has read the other books in the series.

What do you think the narrator could have done better?

The narrators used different accents for some of the characters; for example, one narrator gave Murbella a generic Eastern European accent, while the others used their own accents. The character Scytale was pronounced as "Skytale" by one narrator and "Sigh-tale" by another. It was distracting.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Too long.

Any additional comments?

I love all of the Dune books.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • N. Geninatti
  • 04-09-12

Exciting all the way to the end.

If you could sum up Chapterhouse Dune in three words, what would they be?

Suspenseful, Engaging, Thrilling

What was one of the most memorable moments of Chapterhouse Dune?

I found the moment when O'drade took to the failing sea for one last swim to be the emotional low of the book.

Which character – as performed by the narrators – was your favorite?

Duncan Idaho is the character who is most interesting as a person. His unwavering morals make him my favorite.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

No. I use audio books to get through long sessions such as those in a work environment which involves repetitive labor.

Any additional comments?

Chapterhouse Dune ends the Dune Chronicles nicely and gives the reader a sense of completing a great epic journey through humanity's common history in the universe.

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Daniel Beck
  • 08-02-15

This is the ONLY series Scott Brick should do

I have been a Frank Herbert fan since he first hit the bookstores. I have a first edition of the first three of his published books and really enjoy his style, characters and worlds. This is the where I was first introduced to Audiobooks and Scott Brick. He does a very good job making the stories believable, but he is predictable and after listening to all of the Dune series I can honestly say I can predict his tone and voicing for any part of the book BEFORE he has recorded it.
Scott Brick has really made it so I won't buy many books, not because I don't like Scott Brick but because of the way he performs every book in the same manner as he has with Dune. Somehow Red Rabbit and Atlas Shrugged don't seem right when he reads them.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Matt
  • 19-07-18

A solid book in the series

Another amazing book with superb performance. I found the change in performing artists refreshing and enjoyed the different approaches on the character's voices.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Lisa McLaughlin
  • 03-07-18

Narrator Woes

This is my 6th Dune book on Audible. I love Simon Vance. I'm okay with Scott Brick. But, the female narrator is really tough to listen to. I'm going to plow through, but I basically just tune out everything she says, because her voice is so monotonous. I have to keep replaying it to keep up with the story line, because when she starts narrating, I lose interest.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Anonymous User
  • 24-04-18

Close of a Classic

finally finished Dune-Chapterhouse Dune. what an incredible journey. chapterhouse was much less political than I expected. this is the only novel in the series to be a full "Bene Gesserit" story.