Regular price: £19.99

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
OR
In Basket

Summary

Richard Coles narrates this witty account of life as a parish priest and Radio 4 broadcaster.

After a life of sex and drugs and the Communards - brilliantly recounted in the highly acclaimed first volume of his memoirs Fathomless Riches - the Reverend Richard Coles went on to devote his life to God and Christianity. He is also a much-loved broadcaster, presenting Saturday Live on Radio 4 and giving us regular reason to Pause for Thought on Radio 2.

What is life like for the parson in Britain today? For centuries the Church calendar - and the Church minister - gave character and personality to British life. Today, however, as the shape of the year has become less distinct and faith no longer as privileged or persuasive, that figure has become far more marginal.

In Bringing in the Sheaves, Reverend Coles answers this question. From his ordination during the season of Petertide, through Advent and Christmas to Lent and Easter, he gives us a unique insight into his daily experience in the ministry, with all the joy, drama, difficulty and humour which life - and indeed death - serves up in varying measures.

Told with extraordinary charm and erudition, Bringing in the Sheaves features a multitude of characters and events from parish life against a backdrop of the Christian calendar.

©2016 Richard Coles (P)2016 Orion Publishing Group

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    26
  • 4 Stars
    16
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    29
  • 4 Stars
    9
  • 3 Stars
    5
  • 2 Stars
    2
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    23
  • 4 Stars
    14
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    2
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

Bringing in the sheaves by the Revd Richard Coles

A day to day description of the life of a country Vicar.. He describes his calling,,his life with his partner, who is also a Priest. The seasons of the Church are chronologically written about like a daily diary-very amusing in parts.
A good read.

3 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Entertaining!

Where does Bringing in the Sheaves rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Entertaining book

What was one of the most memorable moments of Bringing in the Sheaves?

Listening to Richard's recount of Parish life.

Have you listened to any of Richard Coles’s other performances? How does this one compare?

Not hear any others

Did you have an emotional reaction to this book? Did it make you laugh or cry?

Laugh

Any additional comments?

Interesting book full of funny moments

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars

Not nearly as good as his first book

What could have made this a 4 or 5-star listening experience for you?

Anything, it was long and boring and i stopped listening about a quarter of the way in. Richard comes across very pompous.

What was most disappointing about Richard Coles’s story?

It was just boring.

Who might you have cast as narrator instead of Richard Coles?

no one. I like listening to The Rev Richard, he just came across badly in this boo.

You didn’t love this book--but did it have any redeeming qualities?

none that I can think of.

Any additional comments?

Buy something else.

  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars

The difficult second volume...

I'm a Richard Coles fan and the high-bar set by his first volume meant it's successor needed to be brilliant. It's very good but it's knocked the bar off on its way over.

Richard is breathtakingly honest and one feels that if the Church listened to him, it may not die out by the end of the century.

Only three stars for performance as the first half of the book seems to have been recorded during a bout of cold.

Worth a listen.