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Summary

So, you have learned the basics of Python and are ready to move on to the next level. You are hungry to learn what things are capable in Python and how to go about doing them. This audiobook provides 21 coding examples, with explanations, and extra extensions you can complete. Though explanations are provided for all code samples, this audiobook won’t hold your hand. It assumes you know a fair bit of Python conventions, but it also assumes you possess the programmer mind-set and the ability to look at a code listing and know more or less what is happening.

The code examples in this audiobook vary in length from some 40 lines of code to more than 200. If you look at the table of contents, there is no discernible method behind them. They cover everything from data structures and algorithms to making games and even web development. 

This audiobook is suitable for seasoned programmers who are new to Python as well. While it doesn’t talk about syntax at all, you will learn how medium-sized Python projects are structured.

Reasons to buy this audiobook: 

  • A total of 21 advanced coding examples using pure Python. These examples go beyond what you may have encountered in introductory guides. 
  • No silly FizzBuzz examples or how-to-for-loop shenanigans. There is no hand-holding here or extensive breakdown of ideas. 
  • Read the code, understand it, modify it, and move on.
  • Each example coding lists a number of possible extensions to keep you busy coding after you have the example down.
  • Learn how to read a real production data set used by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
  • Learn how to make computer games for both the terminal and screen.
  • Get a kick-start into web programming with Python frameworks. 

PLEASE NOTE: When you purchase this title, the accompanying PDF will be available in your Audible Library along with the audio.

©2018 Zach Webber (P)2018 Zapata Publishing

What listeners say about Python: 21 Sample Codes and Advance Crash Course Guide in Python Programming

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Skip the giant python book and get this

Very clear and crisp explanation. Making things easy for those who really want to build fundamental concepts and use them across all areas of computer science field. Good work and I would say the best work can be done for this course. Data visualization makes this course more interesting. Each example coding lists a number of possible extensions to keep you busy coding after you have the example down and also learn how to make computer games for both the terminal and screen.

24 people found this helpful

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Fill in any gaps in your python knowledge

I read most of this book. i liked it. im now one of the millions of mediocre python developers in the world! This is easily the best python-book for intermediates I've come across. Recommend to everyone who wants a exact knowledge than the regular intro-books. And written very well.

I learned and wrote some ActionScript about a decade ago and have hacked away at PHP for years so I understand OOP and the basics of coding. This book layers up the knowledge nicely and I'm finding it easy to learn Python with it. I like that he discusses a topic in a little shorter then informs readers that more on that topic will be available in later chapters. When he gets to the next level of detail on that topic he reviews a little and then digs bit deeper.

I would recommend that those who are completely new to coding find a basic coding book or online course that creates a product / full application of some kind before starting this book. Once you have the basic concept of making magic happen you'll be oriented in this book. First build something cookbook style.

I'm using the Audio version but will probably also buy the Kindle version. The problem with the Audio version is that I don't see my place in the chapter, only the whole 1 hr and 3 mins book.

23 people found this helpful

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Can't be beat!

This is the best book I've found for becoming proficient at Python in a thorough, organized way. Although the book is very short (40 lines), it is neither a cookbook of example programs nor an exhaustive API reference. What the author is trying to do here is teach you the Python coding, and just as important help you understand why Python works the way it does. For those coming from other programming languages, Python has its own philosophy for doing things and this book does a nice job of communicating those core ideas (the "Pythonic" way of programming).
The author puts a lot of thought into the sequencing of material, revisiting concepts several times throughout to convey them at increasing levels of depth. No silly FizzBuzz examples or how-to-for-loop shenanigans. There is no hand-holding here or extensive breakdown of ideas. The book is short but it doesn't feel like it while you're working through it.

23 people found this helpful

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Learned quite a bit!

This being a crash course and for non-technical students too, sometimes it becomes difficult to understand the error code.

Also since class and objects are optional and complicated quite frankly, errors related to same in final submission with no partial marking was quite a setback.

Hope I was able to convey the problem, but the course content was otherwise great and I learned a lot. Thank you!! :D

22 people found this helpful

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Xcellent Pythonic presentation of good Python prog

If you ever want to say honestly, "I really know Python", then you are going to need this book. One can program in Python with just a superficial understanding of the language, just as one can use an equation without knowing how it was derived by just plugging in the variables. But, as the complexity of real world problems one tackles with Python increases, I think a deeper understanding of the language is necessary. That's why this book is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED. Zach Webber does an excellent job of providing that understanding. There is a lot of information. Take what you need at the moment, discard the rest. But have this book nearby for when you need more information. A number of different widgets are introduced here; they are the Frame, Label, Button, Entry and Text widgets. Notice that each widget takes a window as first argument, usually the root window but sometimes a Frame. The grid manager is tricky to understand at first, because the grid is defined as you add widgets and not before. If you try placing a widget on column 10 when there is nothing defined in that range, Tkinter will still place it where you expect column 0 to be. The sticky argument lets you choose which side the widget can expand to fill the entire cell. The grid manager takes into account the heights and widths of widgets, so be careful placing large ones as they will morph the size of cells. Don’t be scared to mess around with the code once you have it working. Break things, build them up again, and break them some more. Truly understand things. Go back and modify the examples, chances are you will find better ways of doing the same things. This is the book on Python! Well written with a lot of useful examples.

21 people found this helpful

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Complete, interesting

I haven't finished studying the whole thing yet, so I don't know who done it, but I think it was the butler. I'm now listening the section on OOP, and I think this is the best explanation on that subject I've listened yet.
If I were as ambitious as Mr. Zach Webber I would be rich by now. This book is chock FULL of information, and it's only finished in 40 lines! If I were a Python coder I would keep this book close by. As a computer hobbyist, who was looking for something to take the place of the old BASIC I used to use to write my own little one-off programs, I am blown away by Python, and this book does it justice.
AND - The Kindle version is well hyper-texted, making it very easy to use. Thank you, Mr. Zach Webber, and thank you, Amazon and Audible!

21 people found this helpful

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Learned it Fast

I am a retired engineer who decided to give Python a go for the photography software I wanted to write. I have quite a bit of experience programming in other languages, but liked the looks of the Python ecosystem. This book takes you from the basics, including the differences from languages like C, Java, C++, C#, etc. For beginners, there are a lot of concept explanations, and for experienced programmers, there are lots of references to how you do things differently. I have read about 2/3 of this book while writing Python code and tapping web sites with more detail on specific modules. Very good jump start and written in a comfortable style.

21 people found this helpful

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Technology for Everyman (or Woman)

This was a great course! Very challenging, and geared toward critical thinking and real life applications if you recognize the potential of these building blocks. The instructions were crystal clear and the coding challenges were probably one of the best put together for online courses. It's a great refresher for experienced programmers as well as beginners. If you are interested in teaching programming, the instructor made it fun and engaging. I really enjoyed this course. It was a nice mix of difficulty and pace where I could complete things while still working a full time job and making time for family. I learned concepts in a structured manner that was much easier than when I attempted to learn everything from scratch last year when attempting to solve an issue with zero Python experience. Highly recommended, especially if you are like me, with 20 years of IT experience and you need to skill up :).

20 people found this helpful

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Super user friendly

This is excellent for an absolute beginners and also well organized and well explained in short and systematic manner . I have a lot of python courses but this one is worth buying , trust me this course makes u understandable than any other courses, thanks again for making this course

20 people found this helpful

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Coders: get to know us!

It is my first course but If I said about this course in a few words about its lecture "It is short and sweet " and the assignments as we going forward a week to another week the difficulty level is increasing. It helps the learner to give pressure on his brain. and logical thinking also developed.

The way of teaching of the instructor is very good and it developed a healthy conversation with the learner.

Overall It is the best course to start learning the python programming.

18 people found this helpful

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  • James Drew
  • 10-05-20

If you know Python, but you want to get to know it

This is not a beginner’s book. It assumes that you are comfortable using Python, the command line, and any text editor of your choice. All examples covered in this book use Python3 so make sure you set up your environment accordingly. The TreeBox class serves as a tree structure of sorts, with each node representing a file or folder similar to the first example in this book. However, unlike the first example, TreeBox uses a recursive solution to finding parents in the tree.

The binary search tree gets its name from the fact that a node can contain at most two children. While this may sound like a restriction, it is actually a good one because the tree becomes intuitive to traverse. An n-ary tree, in contrast, can be messy.

A reoccurring theme in rouge-like games is turned based combat and monster encounters. However, for the sake of keeping things simple the following program focuses on movement alone. Note that creating games for the command line is difficult to do with the Python standard library. One of the chief difficulties arises when it comes to printing text to the screen and erasing it. There are no shortages of tricks that allow you to do this (like printing a bunch of newline characters until the screen is blank) but for this implementation, a simple system call to clear the screen is used.

One of the most unique books on python syntax that you would ever find :) The follow up book "Python: The Complete 3 Books in 1 for Beginners, Intermediate and 21 Sample Codes and Advance Crash Course Guide in Python Programming" complements this and is another good read.

24 people found this helpful

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  • Sidney Shook
  • 11-05-20

Finally the book that got me going!

A number of different widgets are introduced here; they are the Frame, Label, Button, Entry and Text widgets. Notice that each widget takes a window as first argument, usually the root window but sometimes a Frame. The grid manager is tricky to understand at first, because the grid is defined as you add widgets and not before. If you try placing a widget on column 10 when there is nothing defined in that range, Tkinter will still place it where you expect column 0 to be. The sticky argument lets you choose which side the widget can expand to fill the entire cell. The grid manager takes into account the heights and widths of widgets, so be careful placing large ones as they will morph the size of cells. Button widgets have a command argument that allows you to pass a callback function. The callback is executed when the button is pressed. Make sure that all commands passed are just pointers to functions rather than function calls with parentheses. Packed widgets can be moved to a side using the side argument given that there is space. Notice that the Frame widget creates an empty widget or window that other widgets can be placed on. The example uses empty frames to group Button and Entry widgets. If you are wondering what StringVar is, they are objects that correspond to text inside of other widgets. They are the only means to add data to Entry widgets and later retrieve it. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in learning Python from scratch.

22 people found this helpful

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  • Vanessa Nelson
  • 29-10-19

Enjoyable and error free

Great book! As the author says, This audiobook is suitable for seasoned programmers who are new to Python as well. While it doesn’t talk about syntax at all, you will learn how medium-sized Python projects are structured. Also he explains everything, unlike other tutorials I have gone through that give you a bare minimum of explanation and expect you to spend hours looking up the theory and solution. With this book I can spend only 1 hour practicing and coding!
******************************************************************
The book spine is tearing loose from the chapters. The books is not too big; not too many chapters for the audible version and it's becoming usable.
I have listened about 1 hour of the audiobook so far and based on this I can say that:
--> This book keeps me focused on learning the Language
--> Gave me a lot of new information on topics that I thought I knew.
--> As the author says, This audiobook provides 21 coding examples, with explanations, and extra extensions you can complete. Though explanations are provided for all code samples, this audiobook won’t hold your hand.
--> University graduates who have seen some form of basic programming in school should be able to listen this book
Tips for listening: Listen things that you understand as fast as you can, use stickies to mark harder sections that you might want to re listen later. You will find that required and useful information is repeated just like in a classroom
--> You will get as much as you put in to this book--I guess good things in life are not easy .


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  • Betty
  • 29-10-19

Gets you coding right away-

Fantastic course for beginners who want to learn Python from the ground up. It covers the language perfectly. It doesn't dive into anything without telling what it's used for, and why you should care. The way the material is explained makes it easy to follow, which is important when teaching a new language.

22 people found this helpful

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  • Sam
  • 24-07-21

The top jobs in computer programming.

This book is a must-read for anyone aspiring or practicing in the field of quantitative finance. Zach' work is extremely well-written, easy to follow, and detailed.

As a financial engineer, I use numerical methods in my daily life; most of these I thought were only possible in lower-level languages. I was incredibly shocked to learn that all of these advanced mathematical methodologies can be written in Python and used for practical applications in algorithmic trading. In addition to walking the reader through these methods step-by-step, Zach teaches the reader how to build a real, working algorithmic trading strategy (several of them actually) and gives the reader the tools to backtest and implement the strategy for their own use!

This is the first book, to my knowledge, that covers these incredibly important steps and does so in a way that programmers of all experience-levels can understand. Absolutely brilliant work!

21 people found this helpful

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  • Dollie Ring
  • 12-05-20

For the intermediate/expert pythonistas

Any game needs to have a main loop. Each Pygame program must also include a call to the event loop inside of the main loop. Otherwise, it will freeze. There are a few other things that need to happen, such as the initiation of the pygame module using pygame.init while not required, it is considered good practice. This method will load pygame modules for you. Next, set up your display with pygame.display.set_mode. It takes a tuple or list containing screen dimensions for an argument. You should also create a clock object using pg.time.Clock to set up a frame per second timer. Also not needed, but will make your games easier to animate.

The rest of the program is a matter of calling the event loop, doing any calculations, and drawing objects to the screen. For Simon Says only primitives are needed. These are built-in shapes that the pygame engine can draw to the screen using pygame.draw but you may use your own sprites as well. Make sure to include a call to pygame.display.update or pygame.display.flip. These methods actually update the screen on each game tick (execution of a loop). Without these functions, the screen will not change. You can also call them whenever you draw to the screen and want to see immediate results, rather than wait for the entire loop to finish. Finally, for pygame to diplsay fluid animations, the scene needs to be wiped every frame with a call to display.fill. If the entire screen is being used by your program, this color can be black (0,0,0). Otherwise, you might want to use a color that fits the background of your game.

Simon Says is a simple game. It relies on an array that has a preloaded sequence of colors to be displayed at each stage of play. The program above displays the pattern to the user and then waits for input. Notice that you cannot stop the main loop without making calls to time.sleep but this function should be avoided if possible. Instead, use conditional checks that only run sometimes. The main control in the program is the waiting_on_input variable. However, in practice conditionals are rarely adequate for controlling the flow of a complex game. Instead, there are techniques like using finite-state machines to keep track of the state. Here it isn’t necessary. When the player fails to recall a pattern correctly is a game over. Instead of shifting to the game over state, the game simply resets.

This book goes into great detail on several aspects of python. I understand the code in other python books better from reading the related chapters in this book.

21 people found this helpful

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  • George Duncan
  • 29-10-19

Good progression of information

If you already know the basic syntax from a general course like Code Academy, then this book will take you to the next level. Do you know how to write a for loop? Would you also like to know how to rewrite that same loop recursively? This book will teach you how and so many more of the finer details that make Python a flexible language. It is no easy feat to understand it in its entirety, but you will gain a considerable amount of knowledge and experience if you put the concepts to practice. So if you are tired of writing lame grade keepers, shopping carts, and battleship games and are asking yourself how to get to that next level, then this book is for you!

21 people found this helpful

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  • David Rodriquez
  • 29-10-19

Best Python Crash Course book

I am new to Python and this course has given a great introduction to the language. I love the flow of the lessons, it makes it easy to follow though from lecture to lecture.

20 people found this helpful

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  • Carl Gravelle
  • 29-10-19

Bravo!

It's an extremely useful course that takes you from beginner level (basic concepts) to an intermediate level (understanding of modules and their basic operations). I enjoyed understanding the syntax and semantics of Python language.

19 people found this helpful

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  • Sidney
  • 13-05-20

For intermediate Python users to round out their


By far the best python reference I have ever used. Really. The book worth each cent of it's cost. Connecting to the database should feel a little familiar. Using the application.config attribute, you can specify the location of the database (in this case an SQLite one named ‘new.db’). The code essentially creates the database in the same directory. Now you can define models. These will be your database tables. The User model defines a one-to-many relationship with the Note model. In practice, this means that querying the User table with the ORM will expose a Python list that includes every note for that user. Flask is touted as a microframework meaning that it has a bare bones approach to setting up web servers. Other Python web frameworks such as Django offer a more integrated, batteries included approach. Because it is small, Flask allows you greater freedom to do things. It is “unopinionated.” At the same time, it is extensible, meaning you can grab the code from other projects that fulfill some need, such as a database connection as you will see in example # 21. The Card and Deck classes should be straightforward. Card defines operator overload methods to easily sort cards by rank. This comes in handy when high cards need to be determined. Hand does all of the work. The algorithm for determining hand value is as follows: first a BitArray object is created representing the hand, then the hand-type is determined by running checks depending on the number of unique ranks in the hand, and finally the hand value is determined with hand-type leading the sorted list of cards (turned into a hexadecimal value stored in a bytearray type.

18 people found this helpful