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Political Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction

Narrated by: Luci Bell
Length: 4 hrs and 24 mins
Categories: Non-fiction, Philosophy
4 out of 5 stars (30 ratings)

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Summary

This Very Short Introduction introduces listeners to the key concepts of political philosophy: Authority, democracy, freedom and its limits, justice, feminism, multiculturalism, and nationality. Accessibly written and assuming no previous knowledge of the subject, it encourages the listener to think clearly and critically about the leading political questions of our time. Miller first investigates how political philosophy tackles basic ethical questions such as 'how should we live together in society?'
©2003 David Miller (P)2013 Audible, Inc.

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Really good

I bought similar books and was appalled. This, however, is beautifully even handed on all the views out there.
I'd love to see a later edition to see what the author has to say regarding the new politics on multiculturalsm and the decline to the West.

Thanks to the authors :-)

2 people found this helpful

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    3 out of 5 stars

A good introduction.

This book examines some of the 'big questions' in political philosophy. What would life be like without the state? What justifies the state? Who should rule? How much liberty should the citizen enjoy? Are there areas that the government should have no control? Is anarchy a viable option? These chapters were very interesting.

I felt the last two chapters explored the writer's political opinion rather than staying central to the subject which was 'an introduction to political philosophy'. I felt the last two chapters on multiculturalism and feminism could have been replaced by more in depth segments on famous political philosophers for example.

A good performance albeit slightly dry subject matter.

1 person found this helpful

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bad narrator

a bad narrator, needs an academic to read it

also very boring to be honest

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interesting and informative

I found this book to be a great introduction to the subject. I would recommend to anyone interested in this topic.

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Very informative and easy to digest

I would listen to this again as it was very useful for my university degree in Philosophy.
She represents many views in a fair way and raises valuable points.
Thoroughly enjoyed listening to this.

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  • John Gathly
  • 23-01-17

NOT an introduction to political philosophy

This book wasn’t for you, but who do you think might enjoy it more?

I was expecting a short introduction to political philosophy (based on the title). This is more like "Hey, did you ever wonder why we do this and how we could do it differently?"

I wanted an introduction to the actual people who have addressed these issues in the past. There's a brief mention of Plato, a tiny intro to Hume, some very basic and broad Marx. There's an entire chapter on feminism that doesn't mention a single feminist. Just more "gee whiz" questions about "hey, what if women weren't treated as property?" No historical context or linking between schools of thought.

This is just the author asking the questions of political philosophy himself and then answering them himself.

3 people found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 10-03-19

An Axe to Grind?

Was this a book on political philosophy or feminism and multiculturalism? Really. John Locke is simply mentioned in passing on the way to 3 chapters on feminism and multiculturalism. Seems skewed to me.

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  • Jason
  • 13-07-16

The author spews the usual SJW nonsense

The book started alright but the authors lunatic left wing postion becomes increasingly obvious and i gave up when he started spewing the usual feminist falehoods in chapter 5.

I didnt expect the author to agree with everything i think. That wasnt the problem. Spouting known falsehoods as truth was what made it impossible for me to finish.

3 people found this helpful