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Summary

In the world of Fringe (or off-off-Broadway) theatre, a strong debate has been raging for years - when you're producing a low/no-budget production, how on earth can you make it happen and still treat everyone involved in an open, honest, and ethical manner? Where do you stand with profit-share productions when you can't afford to pay Union minimums? Open Book Theatre Management, along with its resources of instructional budget spreadsheets, is the first audiobook ever to show you exactly how to mount a theatre production without losing either your integrity or your shirt. It is aimed at actors, directors, and producers in the early stages of their careers; drama schools; and further and higher educational establishments. The methodologies outlined in the audiobook are transferable across all countries in which arts funding is difficult to secure. The time for going to the establishment with the begging bowl is over. There need be no more excuses. The author will even show you how to start your own theatre company for only a tenner....

©2014 Rafe Beckley (P)2019 Rafe Beckley

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  • DS
  • 16-03-20

An encouraging guide to how it should be done

This book clearly lays out the case for running an open book theater, and pairs that with clear and effective guidance on how to do so. The theater company I was a member of did not practice open book management, and though I didn't consider it at the time, I now wish it had. It could have been very reassuring (or not), when production budgets were hazy, profit sharing was glossed over, etc. For example, we knew we needed to drive attendance, but we never knew the break-even point. While I don't have any plans to run my own theater, I found that much of the advice here could be applicable to a variety of collaborative creative projects - independent films, publications, art shows, etc. Rafe Beckley offers sound advice for building long-term relationships through an ethical, responsible approach to theater budgeting, negotiating, contracts, and production.