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Summary

From identification cards to how we protect our property, public debate rages over what our basic human rights are and how they are to be protected.

In this trenchant and provocative audiobook, Peter Hitchens sets out to show that popular views of these hotly contested issues - from crime and punishment to so-called 'soft drugs' - are based on mistaken beliefs, massaged figures, and cheap slogans. His powerful and counterintuitive conclusions make challenging listening for those on both the Left and the Right and are essential listening for all concerned with creating a lawful and peaceful society.

The Abolition of Liberty argues that because of the misdemeanours of the few, the liberty of the many is seriously jeopardised.

©2016 Peter Hitchens (P)2016 Audible, Ltd

Critic reviews

"It's fair to say that Peter Hitchens remains one of the most misrepresented figures in the British media.... Hitchens is in reality one of the most thought-provoking and intelligent commentators on life in contemporary Britain." (Neil Clark, Spectator)

What members say

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  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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Arguments well made and well meant

May I thank Mr Hitchens for a thoroughly expert book. Superb research and moral enquiry.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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    2 out of 5 stars

Beautifully read nonsense.

Hitchens has a clear pattern here of taking a piece of information which is true, dipping it it either fabrication or opinion, and then claiming this artificial coating is as valid as the original piece of information. It’s like Nutella marketed as heathy because it’s got hazelnuts in it, while ignoring the sugar content.

There’s also a marked inconsistency in his positions. Britain has too much violence, drugs, prisons and government overreach - so should try and be more like America where they have....a lot more of all those things.

The absurd assertions, such as that rock music undermines society or that drugs are the preserve of the “liberal elite” don’t help matters.

To save space the book could be summarized as “grr young people, rule britannia, it was all better in the old days except everything was also worse then too, please don’t look too closely at anything I’ve just said”.

8 of 10 people found this review helpful

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Typically rigorous and compelling. Recommended

Peter Hitchens' analysis of the systemic failures of the modem British policing and justice systems is typically rigorous and compelling, and its lessons and warnings extend far outside Britain's confines.


Highly recommended.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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You must listen to this

A wonderful, funny polemic. This book explains the break down of crime and punishment in the UK in a humorous, yet serious way.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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Thought provoking analysis

As ever Peter Hitchens gives a different and refreshing perspective on the changes to UK policing and the legal system from mid-1960’s to the present day.

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Informative

I think better than to be turned into a murderer yourself through the death penalty, better to send these people home, let their culture deal with them that's my opinion.
Peter Hitchins, not unlike his brother, never disappoints. Informative as usual, words of an experienced, well travelled, well educated man, who is never out to impress only to speak the truth, no matter what the popular word of the day.

6 of 12 people found this review helpful

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Dreadful!

Absolutely dreadful in all respects. Stopped reading it after the 3rd chapter. He comes across as an obnoxious snob. His reading style is that of a bored, but arrogant, teacher.

0 of 3 people found this review helpful