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Summary

Rebecca Solnit's essay 'Men Explain Things to Me' has become a touchstone of the feminist movement, inspired the term 'mansplaining', and established Solnit as one of the leading feminist thinkers of our time - one who has inspired everyone from radical activists to Beyonce Knowles.

Collected here in print for the first time is the essay itself, along with the best of Solnit's feminist writings. From rape culture to mansplaining, from French sex scandals to marriage and the nuclear family, from Virginia Woolf to colonialism, these essays are a fierce and incisive exploration of the issues that a patriarchal culture will not necessarily acknowledge as 'issues' at all.

With grace and energy, and in the most exquisite and inviting of prose, Rebecca Solnit proves herself a vital leading figure of the feminist movement and a radical, humane thinker.

©2014 Rebecca Solnit (P)2014 Audible Ltd

Critic reviews

"Exceptional… The feminist debate has once again exploded into the mainstream over the last few years, and this collection marks Solnit out as among the most thoughtful of many energetic writers leading it" (Jessica Abrahams in Prospect)
"Slim but trenchant collection of essays… As a collection it is an eloquent reminder that we still have some way to go when it comes to speaking of the issues she raises. She writes forcefully about the case of Domonique Strauss-Kahn. And yet this is not a gloomy book" (Erica Wagner in The Financial Times)
'[Rebecca] is not one of the most important female essayists of her generation. She is one of the most important essayists of her generation." (Stuart Kelly in the Scotland on Sunday )

What members say

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    2 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Great essays, awful perky narration

The narrator sounds like she's smiling through all the descriptions of terrible wars, gang rapes of children etc. Like the endlessly, inappropriately cheery newsreader from 'Futurama', but with vocal fry.

Sorry, but has to be said. :(

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Great book, awful narrator

Amazing book of essays: So powerful. So thoughtful. So necessary.
The narrator, on the other hand, spoke like a news robot. Over-enunciating the wrong syllables, her cantor was inauthentic. She sounds comedically American- not like a real human, but a caricature of my country-people. The most disappointing and truly distracting aspect of her narration is that she, rather expertly, keeps an optimism and happiness in her tone, as if she’s smiling with every word. It’s as if the entire narration is an advertisement selling laundry soap. When she should be slower, more deliberate, more somber, she sounds like she’s telling someone’s secret, with a pleasurable smile. These stories require more gravity, more seriousness, more austerity. I wish I could tell her: It’s okay not to sound happy or read this with a smile. It’s okay not to be giving the listener an audible wink. Please, retake this. Be authentic. Be nuanced. Allow yourself to be immersed and affected.
For the potential reader, buy the book.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    5 out of 5 stars

Well researched lost momentum at chapter 6,

Enjoyed first 5 chapters, very harrowing statistics, well put together, slightly slow in Chapter 6, but great overall read.
covers issues relevant to men and women who care about equality and basic human decency to one another.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Everyone should read this book not just women!

I learnt so much from this book about the steps we are making to reach a more equal world for both genders.

0 of 2 people found this review helpful