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Summary

Highly original, provocative and thought-provoking, Yuval Noah Harari asks important questions, with clarity and focus, about what the tech-driven future holds for humankind.

As the world teeters on the edge of a great precipice of change, what price will we have to pay?

Yuval Noah Harari, author of the best-selling Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, envisions a not-too-distant world in which we face a new set of challenges. Now, in Homo Deus, he examines our future with his trademark blend of science, history, philosophy and every discipline in between.

Homo Deus explores the projects, dreams and nightmares that will shape the 21st century - from overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers?

This is the next stage of evolution. This is Homo Deus. War is obsolete. You are more likely to commit suicide than be killed in conflict. Famine is disappearing. You are at more risk of obesity than starvation. Death is just a technical problem. Equality is out - but immortality is in. What does our future hold?

©2016 Yuval Noah Harari (P)2016 Random House Audiobooks

What members say

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  • david
  • London, UK
  • 17-03-17

Full of "wow, I never thought of it like that!"

Where does Homo Deus rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

A really great follow-up to Sapiens. It didn't go in the direction I expected, but Harari, as ever, gives you lots and lots of food for thought!

What did you like best about this story?

The author manages to point out parallels in history that seem totally obvious once you hear them, but you'd never have thought of yourself. Then he extrapolates forward in a logical way to reach some very interesting, and sometimes challenging, predictions.

What does Derek Perkins bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

Personally I find this kind of non-fiction fascinating, but sometimes difficult to engage with when I'm not fresh. But by listening to it, so much of the hard work of bringing meaning out from the words is done by the narrator, so you can literally just sit back and listen.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

For me, this was one to take in in sections. The chapters are arranged logically and sensibly, and I like to absorb and reflect on one before I move on to the next

15 of 15 people found this review helpful

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Second best book I've read

it stands just after Sapiens...amazing book! This book should be mandatory at schools, would make the difference.

13 of 14 people found this review helpful

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too much retreading of Sapiens: inevitable sequel?

felt like a rehash from the final chapters of Sapiens without a lot to say for itself. interesting enough, but nowhere near as compelling.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • m
  • 24-12-16

Brilliant vision of where we might be heading

Brilliant, insightful, well researched and thought-provoking vision of the future of mankind. Disturbing and saddening in parts to realise the accuracy of his observations and logical extrapolation into the Brave new world that may await us.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Fascinating

Excellent book, incredibly thought provoking and challenging. Walks you through religious history to religious future and makes you question your existing prejudices.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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All that but no bag of chips

What did you like best about Homo Deus? What did you like least?

Conclusion and that it was a sequel to Sapiens even though I think it did not live up to the glory of Sapiens.

If you’ve listened to books by Yuval Noah Harari before, how does this one compare?

I rated Sapiens 5 and Homo Deus 3.5 (out of 5).

What does Derek Perkins bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

He has a great voice and his narration style for this book is spot on because it is similar to the narration of a well done documentary.

If this book were a film would you go see it?

I don't see how it could be made into a movie but who knows. I would only watch as a follow up to Sapiens being made into a documentary-like movie.

Any additional comments?

Once in a while a book comes along that blows your mind. So much so that you just can't help but sing its praise to anyone who chats with you for more than five mins. Sapiens was such a book for me. I was looking forward to Homo Deus but unfortunately it was not worth my anticipation. There were parts repeated from Sapiens which I guess were included to give context to anyone who hasn't read Sapiens. A bit annoying but fair enough. I could have lived with that if chapters did not fill me with anticipation only to fall flat.

Overall I still give Homo Deus 3.5 stars (out of 5) because it pushes the boundaries of our present day beliefs (what Harari calls the 'myths' we tell ourselves) and for the conclusion which still manages to leave the reader intrigued, challenged and, for some, resigned to the notion that the world is well on its way to that conclusion unless something gives.

Thankfully, the narration is good and Harari's brilliance still shines through the paragraphs. I can't help but wonder what else that brilliance would have unearthed if Harari had taken his sweet time with this sequel.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Yuval & Derek do it again!

What a book! Great ideas & concepts which are brilliantly read. Top book. If you liked the first then you will like this too!

9 of 11 people found this review helpful

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  • Ed
  • 09-06-17

Very thought provoking

Another excellent book by this author. Highly recommended. Some of his ideas and conclusions are difficult to take, but his logic is strong. Making us think was probably his purpose. Although tempting to listen without a break it probably better to take a break after each chapter and reflect on it.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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peak behind the curtain

fabulous look into how current society has come to be and where is mostly likely natural course will take it. a must read for an inquisitive mind.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • MR
  • 06-10-16

Fairly interesting, but wasn't for me.

I was looking for a book that would consider in depth what the next decades and centuries might hold for humanity. The author started strong, but I felt they soon wandered off subject to meander around various historical sociopolitical issues, pop economics, philosophy and psychology. The author is clearly highly intelligent and very broadly read. Some of their arguments appeared to me very well formulated. But many more seemed weak, one-sided and somewhat incoherent at points. I was particularly struck by some very unsteady trampling around the field of psychology, a subject I know more about. I also wondered whether the author had a firm grasp of the theory of evolution, and may have benefited from re/reading some of Richard Dawkins' excellent books. For me, this book ended up feeling like being stuck at a dinner party with a charming but rather self-opinionated know-it-all. By the end I was happy to be leaving, and slightly wishing I'd stayed home instead.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

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  • Muzzaffar
  • 17-04-17

The book is great but the narrative is incomplete

I read and listen to audible at the same time. I realised that the narration of the book is incomplete. The narrator tend to skip a few paragraphs. Due to this reason, i have to constantly pause the audiobook in order to read the paragraph myself.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

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  • Louis D. van Niekerk
  • 25-11-17

If you want to have your mind bend and stretched a bit, this book is for you

If Homo Sapiens gave me a few different and deeper perspectives about humanity, then Homo Deus really stretched my big picture systematic thinking mind into different orbits.

I can cery well see some of the scenarios discussed here come to fruition- in fact I see many of the trains having left the stations already.

If anything, the book assumes to have figured out consciousness as a mere emergent property of complex networks and algorithms for which the scientific community has no consensus yet. The possibility that human computational powers extend still deeper than the presumed smart algorithms of the future cannot be discarded. In fact, that seems to me to be our only hope of survival as a species.

Excellent book! Really excellent!!

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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  • Anonymous User
  • 19-04-18

Excellent,mind blowing, amazing

Data and logrithm was most thrilling,mind blowing and super duper chappters , Beyond ranking work

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  • Bradley Shaw
  • 19-04-18

Brilliant

A fantastic follow on from Sapiens. If you enjoyed Sapiens download, read/listen to this book now.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 16-04-18

Great insightful book!

Great book with interesting concepts. Incites us to think for ourselves if our current mindset or if it was influenced by others while sharing the impacts of the current mindset to our future with the onset of artificial intelligence

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  • Amrit
  • 25-03-18

Must For All Homo Sapiens

This book can be seen as a prophecy. But if you don't want it to happen then we will have to make sure that we take charge of Dataism rather than it taking control over us.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
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  • Kaj Török
  • 10-03-18

For people who love a future for humans

Intelligent, paradigmshifting, non-nostalgic, clear and yet deeply confusing. As it should be when we are talking about the future for everyone and everything. A masterpiece.

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  • Qamar Aftab
  • 30-01-18

One of the beat books i have read

Very well written and narrated. I am definitely going to listen to it again when time permits.

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    4 out of 5 stars
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  • noVack
  • 14-01-18

Man: Will we or won’t we...

We will become victims of our own success. Or will we? This is a broad survey & it would be a cheap shot to accuse Harari of dystopian depression. His contention is that just as we’ve created a United polity, the vast majority of us are now at a distinct disadvantage as the existential battle turns away from disease hunger & war towards bliss immortality & expanded consciousness.
It’s painful to read his determination about humanism & capitalism but the upshot remains that if he’s even half right, most of us have already bet on the wrong future for our descendants.
Read this book if you want to consider what the year 2150 will NOT have in common with 2020 but be prepared to be annoyed by Harari’s unsympathetic eye.

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  • VC
  • 23-12-17

exceptional book with insights to shake you up

Loved it. One the the few books that elevate our understanding and sensitivity. A must read.