Listen free for 30 days

Love, Poverty, and War

Journeys and Essays
Narrated by: Anthony May
Length: 19 hrs and 59 mins
Categories: Non-fiction, World Affairs
4 out of 5 stars (92 ratings)

£7.99/month after 30 days. Cancel anytime

Summary

"I did not, I wish to state, become a journalist because there was no other 'profession' that would have me. I became a journalist because I did not want to rely on newspapers for information."

Love, Poverty, and War: Journeys and Essays showcases the Hitchens rejection of consensus and cliché, whether he's reporting from abroad in Indonesia, Kurdistan, Iraq, North Korea, or Cuba, or when his pen is targeted mercilessly at the likes of William Clinton, Mother Theresa ("a fanatic, a fundamentalist, and a fraud"), the Dalai Lama, Noam Chomsky, Mel Gibson, and Michael Bloomberg.

Hitchens began the '90s as a "darling of the left" but has become more of an "unaffiliated radical" whose targets include those on the "left", whom he accuses of "fudging" the issue of military intervention in the Balkans, Afghanistan and Iraq. Yet, as Hitchens shows in his reportage, cultural and literary criticism, and opinion essays from the last decade, he has not jumped ship and joined the right but is faithful to the internationalist, contrarian, and democratic ideals that have always informed his work.

©2012 Christopher Hitchens (P)2012 Audible Ltd

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    51
  • 4 Stars
    22
  • 3 Stars
    12
  • 2 Stars
    5
  • 1 Stars
    2

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    44
  • 4 Stars
    23
  • 3 Stars
    6
  • 2 Stars
    4
  • 1 Stars
    1

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    37
  • 4 Stars
    20
  • 3 Stars
    14
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    1

Reviews - Please select the tabs below to change the source of reviews.

Sort by:
Filter by:
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Hitchens the Great

Christopher Hitchens at his best a brilliant collection which shows why he is missed by those who followed him and his work on so many diverse subjects.

5 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Badly arranged.

I particularly enjoyed the essays in the second half of this book. The first 10 or so chapters I found pretty boring and plodding.

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars

Long live the Hitch

An excellent collection of essays covering topics from the first Gulf war to the first couple of years post 9/11. Hitch tells it like it is, with wit and a level of Iconoclastic critique, he cuts through the bullshit and lays bare the hypocrisy of the some of the left and rights biggest heroes.

1 person found this helpful

  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars

Very Opinionated

The author has very strong views about many people (e.g. Churchill, Mother Theresa, Bob Dylan) and I feel woe betide anyone who disagrees with him. It begins with Churchill, which I found interesting, then the rest of 'part one was very dull. Parts two and three are better. On Cuba he mentions in passing the free education and excellent (free) healthcare, then goes into detail about what he considers are negatives. What is so good about democracy which gave the world George W Bush and Tony Bliar? Not one of my favourites.

3 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars

I simply couldn't get into this book

I'm afraid I couldn't connect with this book at all. I worked hard at concentrating but found my mind wandering all the while. I am not sure if it was the subject matter or the narrator or a combination of both. A my advice would be to think carefully before downloading and to listen to the sample which foolishly I did not.

1 person found this helpful