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London Match

Narrated by: James Lailey
Series: Bernard Samson, Book 3
Length: 14 hrs and 45 mins
4.5 out of 5 stars (187 ratings)

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Summary

Long-awaited reissue of the final part of the classic spy trilogy GAME, SET and MATCH when the Berlin Wall divided not just a city but a world. The spy who's in the clear doesn't exist...

Bernard Samson hoped they'd put Elvira Miller behind bars. She said she had been stupid, but it didn't cut any ice with Bernard. She was a KGB-trained agent and stupidity was no excuse. There was one troubling thing about Mrs Miller's confession - something about two codewords where there should have been one. The finger of suspicion pointed straight back to London. And that was where defector Erich Stinnes was locked up, refusing to say anything. Bernard had got him to London; now he had to get him to talk...

©2014 Len Deighton (P)2014 HarperCollins Publishers Limited

Critic reviews

"Deighton is back in his original milieu, the bleak spy world of betrayers and betrayed" ( The Observer)
"A master of fictional espionage" ( Daily Mail)
"The poet of the spy story" ( The Sunday Times

What members say

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  • JT
  • 19-08-15

An uncanny ability to get inside the mind of the intelligence community

An exceptional novel, beautifully read by James Lailey. Len Deighton has a great understanding of human nature and motivation and has a remarkable gift for creating totally fascinating and thoroughly absorbing storylines. It's high time that the 20th century espionage novel, especially when written by the likes of Len Deighton, John le Carre and Edward Wilson, was accepted as a respected genre within the world of serious literary fiction.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

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The master of the spy story

Any additional comments?

My comments on Berlin Game apply to the whole series. If you like spy stories you will not be disappointed.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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Cold War Incompetence

Another great performance by narrator who nails Bernard perfectly..and deals with other strong cast members superbly. Excellent.

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A great end to a great trilogy

I really enjoyed the 3 books. They take a while to get going, but once you get into the story and the characters, I really enjoyed it. Narration is very good. If you look at the 3 books as a whole, I have a few criticisms (a slow start, and the books do crawl sometimes), but overall I would recommend the series. Best one is the 2nd.

Not quite as good as the Palmer books (which James Lailey also narrates very well).

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Well worth listening to the trilogy.

This book was well read, the story kept dragging me back even when I didn't really have time to listen.
While the character of Samson took some time to appreciate, I'd say he's not as instantly likeable as George Smiley, he has slowly grown on me.
Yeah worth a listening to if you haven't before, if you have and liked the previous ones then I think you'll like this one.
Well worth listening to the trilogy, I will continue on to the next trilogy in the series with anticipation.

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A Classic Spy Novel

I Like Len Deighton’s style of writing. I’m new to the audio book presentation but found the pace and presentation of James Lailey’s narration worked well for me.

This is the third book in a trilogy of trilogies and by accident of my local library lending me the previous audio book (Mexico Set). I would recommend starting at the start if you know what I mean, though each book does gloss over the back story just enough to make sense.

The descriptive style plants colourful backdrops in your mind whilst the characters are involving. The storylines offer up both complex and mundane challenges for our main character and the net result is a truly believable read (sorry listen).

I’m looking forward to moving onto the next book.

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Absolutely gripping end to the trilogy

This is a fantastic tense intricate Cold War spy drama which brings a great trilogy to a close. Wonderful locations, more fantastic conversation and characters. You MUST listen to the other two books before though. Very very good. Onto the next!

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I hate these books finishing

they are so well written. the narrator is the best I listen to and I listen to several books s month.

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Super Cold War spy drama

This is the third book in the series (Game, Set, Match) and although it can be read without the earlier books I do recommend that they are read in the correct order to get the best from them.
I read these in the 80's and was a little doubtful about revisiting - the Berlin Wall is down and the Cold War run it course but they have stood the test of time.
Great characters, interesting story well crafted for a perfect narration. There is very limited repetition of information through the books and characters and story are developed with fresh material strengthening the characters with each book.
Some people die, some have affairs or fall in love but it does not rely on gratuitous sex or violence to sell books. Neither does the writing have an eye on the film rights - what a refreshing change!
Think La Carre, think quality, think Deighton.
Next series - Hook, Line, Sinker - already preparing to listen.

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  • Lou
  • London, United Kingdom
  • 28-03-16

Three down, six to go!

It is with a heavy heart that I review this book. London Match is , essentially, part three in the Bernard Samson series, written by the great Len Deighton. I have loved every minute of this book, and the two preceeding it, Berlin Game and Mexico Set. I intend to read/listen to all nine in the series. I really didn't want this to end, as I know I'm already a third of the way through the series.

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  • suresh kumar
  • 17-12-18

Absorbing...

After having listened to the first two books, I could not resist listening the last in the trilogy immediately. The story is very well conceived and takes unexpected twists and turns. It is like wataching a game of chess. Who isthe winner or who is the loser? erhaps nobody. Or perhaps everyone. I derinitely want to read the other two trilogies in this series.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Hank
  • 08-05-19

Great accompaniment to Le Care.

Cold War espionage written concurrently with the era, great stuff.

When I'm feeling down, there's something about the suffering, ego-driven competency of Bernard Sampson that really lightens me, makes me feel like I have an ally.