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Jordanetics

A Journey into the Mind of Humanity's Greatest Thinker
By: Vox Day
Narrated by: Thomas Landon
Length: 7 hrs and 31 mins
Categories: Non-fiction, Politics
4.5 out of 5 stars (8 ratings)

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Summary

Jordan Peterson is believed by many to be the greatest thinker that humanity has ever known. He is Father Figure, Philosopher-King, and Prophet to the millions of young men who are his most fervent fans and followers. He is the central figure of the Intellectual Dark Web, an academic celebrity, and an unparalleled media phenomenon who has shattered all conceptions of what it means to be modern celebrity in the Internet Age. 

He has, by his own admission, thought thoughts that no man has ever thought before. He has dared to dream dreams that no man has ever dreamed before. 

Of course, Jordan Peterson also happens to be a narcissist, a charlatan, and an intellectual con man who doesn't even bother to teach the subjects upon which he lectures. He is a defender of free speech who silences other speakers, a fearless free-thinker who never hesitates to run away from debates, difficult questions, and controversial issues, a philosopher who rejects the conventional definition of truth, and a learned professor who has failed to read most of the great classics of the Western canon. He is, in short, a shameless and unrepentant fraud who lacks even a modicum of intellectual integrity. 

But is Jordan Peterson more than a mere fraud? Is he something more sinister, more unbalanced, and even more dangerous? In Jordanetics: A Journey into the Mind of Humanity's Greatest Thinker, political philosopher Vox Day delves deeply into the core philosophy that Jordan Peterson advocates in both his written works and his video lectures. In doing so, Day methodically builds a shocking case that will convince even the most skeptical Jordan Peterson supporter to reconsider both the man and his teachings.

©2018 Vox Day (P)2019 Vox Day

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  • Mal
  • Southend on Sea, Essex United Kingdom
  • 06-04-19

Jordan the narcissist


I read 12 rules and was quite sure I misunderstood the meaning, now I know why.
Very well explained, thanks Vox for steering me away from a wizard.

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A great analysis of the good doctor

Excellent take-down, but far too much repetition. The book should have been edited. The narrator was very good.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 06-06-19

Glorious

Vox, I wish that I were able to shake your hand, look you in the eyes, and say thank you for putting this together. You successfully managed to shine the spotlight directly on many of the parts of the book which I had some major contentions with well also illuminating Peterson's many contradictions. You also successfully managed to expose the elephant in the room when evaluating the bigger picture of 12 rules for life, is Peterson crazy or is he Dr Evil himself? I have my hunches but I believe that in time we will know with certainty.

Fellow readers, listeners, your understanding of the philosophy behind 12 Rules for Life is incomplete without finishing Jordanetics. The hard copy of this book is going up on my shelf directly next to Peterson's book so that one day when my children get around to reading Peterson's book they can follow up with Vox Day's book to prevent themselves from being poisoned by Peterson's rat's nest of a philosophy.

Again, Vox,
Thank you,
Matthew James

3 of 4 people found this review helpful

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  • Tanicia Workman
  • 15-04-19

great book

loved the book, loved the quotes and using them in context. I've read the 12 rules for life and this book easily explains why so much of that one confused me.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 28-11-19

Good Overall with a few issues.

I am not a Jordan Peterson fan necessarily but I think this book really doesn't give him a fair shake. It's more of a hitpiece than anything. Its well written and performed but it was pretty unfair for the most part.

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  • Trigger Reset
  • 09-07-19

Understanding the broken Peterson.

this is the best breakdown of Jordan Peterson and his delusional philosophy...
updates needed for the JP craziness continues.

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  • Tom Poleski
  • 28-03-19

Distasteful character assassination.

There's some paragraphs there where he nails Peterson pretty good but the majority of it can be easily countered and didn't change my opinion of the man as being noble and good overall. I found the parts about comparisons with the occult to be the most interesting part of the book, the rest I slogged through and found very distasteful. Day's own "12 rules" at the very end of the book are wise and a good alternative to Pererson's.

4 of 8 people found this review helpful

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  • Anthony V
  • 21-02-19

Pay credit for Narrator to read YouTube Comments.

If you are going to try and kill the king, you had best not miss. Vox Day misses (badly) and comes off as an insufferable twit in the process. Bombastic, overwrought, trite, churlish. Sad. About 10% of what the author notes are accurate observations where Peterson could improve his content or delivery. Unfortunately, they are buried in Bombast and manure of the remaining 90%. The narrator does a decent job of making it interesting.

Don't take my word for it:
Summary of final chapter 23 (at 6:47:35 in the book): "He wants to serve the tripartite role of messiah, savior, and pope ... Jordan Peterson is Crazy and Evil..."

The content reads like a deposition in which the FBI tries to catch someone on perjury. The focus is on process violations vs the subtext of the message. (for those not aware, when speaking with the FBI ANY statement you make, whether material to the case or not must be factual or you ARE guilty of making a false statement... for example, look up how they got Martha Stewart, it was in the details of the false statement, not securities fraud). That is what hearing this feels like.

Also, in the forward, Yiannopolis palters by leaving out the context of what Peterson said. The context was focusing on the comparison of Yianopolis to Hitler, which Peterson took umbrage with. Peterson was not calling Yianopolis a White supremacist, although the transcript they read could be construed to sound that way because they stop and leave out the part where Peterson takes umbrage with the comparison.

The ad hominem is strong in this one as well. Vox Day (real name Theodore Robert Beale) takes a heavy-handed approach, pointing out Peterson's discussions on his family's history with depression. Beale uses this as the basis to discredit Peterson's work out of the gate (mental illness = unsound arguments and fraudulent positions.) Yet, if Beale applies this own standard to himself, his assessment of Peterson would be tainted by the fact that Beale's father is a convicted felon who was found guilty of a multimillion-dollar tax fraud scheme and who subsequently threatened the life of a federal judge. The fact that Beale led with this ad hominem (which could also be said to apply to Beale and his family). was cause for concern... but I soldiered on. I really wanted to hear what Beale had to say because I value contrary points as they help me to see things from a different point of view.

At least 90 minutes of this audiobook is the narrator (somewhat skillfully yet tediously) reading youtube comments. Unnecessary and pedantic. It really was starting to border on childish at this point.

What is most frustrating about the premise of this book is the fact that Beale takes quotes from Peterson that he has made over time and takes them as a snapshot in time. An example that stands out to me is where he takes a quote Peterson made at age 14 about becoming Prime Minister of Canada and contrasts that with a statement made decades later about how he didn't really have an interest in politics. He uses this to accuse Peterson of being a liar and charlatan. I would ask Beale, is no one is allowed to change their mind over time based on new facts or life experiences? Sad. Waste of a credit.

13 of 27 people found this review helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 31-07-19

Great

Unlike Jordan, Vox days arguments are easy to follow and understand, he speaks clearly, not word mumbo jumbo

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Maria Liyubman
  • 19-06-19

Still awaiting the same book on Stephan Molyneux, who made the same mistakes yet reached different conclusions......

I bought this book after watching Milo’s internet conversation with Peterson. After for a long time wondering why I never understood the fuss about him. I realized that he was so frustrated with Milo not fitting into his box that no matter how many times he answered Peterson’s question about his sexual abuse, He never let him veer off topic, despite Milo clearly answering it and talking about channeling his recovery into a new show and a happily married life. However, being Jewish puts me at a unique perspective. I have a lot of criticism for our own left, for Jews in media and Hollywood and Jews responsible for their part in the soviet revolution (then still having to comply with “Jew quotas” in their classless Utopia as a form of Political Justice), but what most people don’t know is that leftist Jews detest Zionism, and as such, when hearing from someone criticizing Jews in Hollywood as Zionist, I instantly understand that they’re ignorant and racist. When I discovered Stephan Molyneux I thought HE represented what Peterson does for many. And yet, he regularly manipulated statistics to suit his own goals and the first example Day gives on the false statistic Peterson used in Jewish Ashkenazi IQ is also repeated shamelessly by Molyneux for a much more racist agenda, that somehow never came to Day’s attention, or did it? In fact, the only difference between the two is that Peterson doesn’t claim there’s a conspiracy and Molyneux does. Yet Day is more worried about Peterson not defending Molyneux when in fact, by the very first error he found in Peterson, he must write a book on Molyneux next... where is it?
This is a man who claimed Jews want open borders everywhere but Israel, when in fact, had he done his research he would have found that the leftist Jews pressured the Israeli government to let in tens of thousands of African migrants, one of whom attacked me and opened my eyes to the harsh reality of how much media lies. The only way to miss the fact that just like in America, there are two sides at war in Israel as well, is if you would lump all Jews together, and this is also proven by how he uses IQ statistics as universal proof for white people being the smartest and blacks being inferior, he actually took the next step and said this “discovery” broke his heart. But Vox disproved it in the first paragraph of his book... crickets about Molyneux... Molyneux also claims in one video that Israel doesn’t attack Gaza in self defense, this despite always speaking out against Islam and knowing very well that western societies don’t wake up in the morning wanting to kill off an entire population (unless socialist...), and yet, he not only ignores the fact that what he was talking about followed years of Israeli restraint for rocket fire, but that it was also largely provoked by Hamas. Many people on the right who just woke up to the reality of being lied to and lied about never realized Israel was the same way until much later in life, and I usually recognize that by their willingness to have an open discussion, but I also know that if you write an entire book destroying someone’s career for misusing statistics and then refuse to criticize someone similar with the only difference being he reached your favorable conclusion of “a Jewish conspiracy” because someone promoted Ben Shapiro over the author of this book, despite Vox having more views to his articles, I find I learned more about the author than about Peterson, despite many valid and interesting points for which I am grateful, but will check for myself having seen the first paragraph for what it is...
I advise other readers to do the same.
He bases Shapiro’s promotion as the only indication of a Jewish conspiracy, when in fact, Shapiro isn’t leftist, ruling out Hollywood and the media’s interest in promoting what he has to say, and the fact that promoting Shapiro red-pilled many leftist Jews from what they grew up believing about secularism and socialism, thus making them vote for Trump and Netanyahu, both conservative, both nightmares for progressive Jews in power.
This is why I love being Jewish and Israeli, I can always tell by someone’s coverage of Jews and Israel. And it’s not that I don’t recognize I have a biased point of view as a conservative-leaning secular, Zionist Jew, but it’s very easy to recognize bigoted ignorance when most “scientific types” give Zionism as an example of Jewish mass conspiracy while always misusing Zionism to make it look as if Leftist Jews are Zionists, when in fact they’re as Zionist as democrats are Trump supporters. Zion is one of the Biblical names of Jerusalem, Zionists worked to create a nation state in Israel, anyone who knows even a little bit about this issue knows that this term is used many times as anti Jewish propaganda, Mostly by Muslims and Progressives and they can never answer the question of: If there is a mass conspiracy of Zionist Jews dominating the world, why is every coverage of Israel (the very materialization of Zionism) always negative, hateful and victim blaming.

1 of 4 people found this review helpful