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Summary

Contains an exclusive Q&A with the author, Marcus Chown.

Best-selling author Marcus Chown explores some of the most profound and important science about us, our world and beyond by examining some astonishing facts that reveal the vast complexities of the universe.

There is much about our world that seems to make perfect sense, and important scientific breakthroughs have helped us understand ourselves, our planet and our place in the universe in fascinating detail. But our adventures in space, our deepening understanding of the quantum world and huge leaps in technology over the last century have also revealed a universe far stranger than we could ever have imagined. 

With brilliant clarity and wit, best-selling author Marcus Chown examines the profound science behind 50 remarkable scientific facts that help explain the vast complexities of our existence. Did you know that you could fit the whole human race in the volume of a sugar cube? Or that the electrical energy in a single mosquito is enough to cause a global mass extinction? Or that, out there in the cosmos, there are an infinite number of copies of you reading an infinite number of copies of this?

Infinity in the Palm of Your Hand is a mind-bending journey through some of the most weird and wonderful facts about our universe, vividly illuminating the hidden truths that govern our everyday lives. 

©2018 Marcus Chown (P)2018 Michael O'Mara

What listeners say about Infinity in the Palm of Your Hand

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Science is catching up ;)

I hope this book will help people open their minds and see the true nature of reality. Step out of the box!
One love

3 people found this helpful

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A fascinating book, but...

Marcus Chown writes great popular science books. it's just a pity that he narrates them too. This collection of short examinations of such scientific topics as quantum theory and cosmology is written in such a way that Chown clearly explains some mind-bending theories of physics with a clever turn of phrase. Unfortunately, his narration sounds like a substitute physics teacher reading unenthusiastically from a text book. A pity, as the subject matter deserves a more vibrant presentation.

3 people found this helpful

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A fascinating collections of facts

Not a story, but a collection of impossibly interesting facts and some context to make them make some sort of sense, even if they boggle the mind! A nice easy pace and very easy just to drop in for a fact or two as the fancy takes you! I really enjoyed Marcus Chown’s delivery and his underlying sense of wonder about all the things he was sharing. If science facts are a turn off for you you will already know this isn’t for you, but otherwise most enjoyable.

3 people found this helpful

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Scattergun look at a variety of scientific facts.

Fifty brief overviews of diverse (and quite random) scientific facts. While a lot of the material was interesting, I found the whole approach of the book far too scattergun, and the material not covered in sufficient detail.

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Entertaining

Really nice book enjoyed listening to it. Educated and entertained at the same time Recommended

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Fun, light book

This book wasn't quite what I expected it to be and it took me a bit longer than expected to finish it. There were some interesting facts in the book but I don't think it's a memorable book. Maybe a coffee table book that you randomly open when having guests and ask them "Did you know...?".

For someone who isn't much into science, this book is a great start to learn some facts about the world and universe. I absolutely applaud the attempt to make science more attractive and understandable to a wider range of people.


I listened to the audiobook on Audible narrated by the author himself and the part I enjoyed the most was actually at the end when he unscripted responds to some questions about science. You can hear the excitement in his voice, something that I missed through the book.

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  • Philomath
  • 18-10-18

Wonders of the Universe

Regardless how many times I hear the incredible unknowns of the universe it’s always just as fascinating.

This author brings this story in his own words and adds his own little perspective of wonderment which I found engaging.

Recommended to all those that can’t get enough of the infinite wonders of physics and the universe.