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Summary

Lombard Street by Walter Bagehot is a description of the money market, published in 1873. Bagehot was one of the first writers to describe and explain the world of international and corporate finance, banking, and money in understandable language. This book was in part a reaction to the 1866 collapse of Overend, Gurney and Company, located at 65 Lombard Street, from which comes the title.
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Specialist interest

Excellent reading by narrator. Of course this is a famous book. So anyone who reads it probably already interested in finance. Precise, elegant language of author is a pleasure. And his dry observation interesting and amusing. But its alo a bit tedious at times despite being of modest length.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Philo
  • 21-10-11

Banking and institutional history fans may like it

Bagehot was a ground-breaking writer on things financial and economic. This work was a landmark I believe in the formation of 20th-century concepts of banking, and central banking in particular. Those who enjoyed "The Bankers Who Broke the World" might like this, though this is drier. I liked the cadence of this fine, sober English prose.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful