Regular price: £23.49

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
OR
In Basket

Summary

On March 11, 2011, an earthquake large enough to knock the earth from its axis sent a massive tsunami speeding toward the Japanese coast and the aging and vulnerable Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power reactors. Over the following weeks, the world watched in horror as a natural disaster became a man-made catastrophe: fail-safes failed, cooling systems shut down, nuclear rods melted.

In the first definitive account of the Fukushima disaster, two leading experts from the Union of Concerned Scientists, David Lochbaum and Edwin Lyman, team up with journalist Susan Q. Stranahan, the lead reporter of the Philadelphia Inquirer’s Pulitzer Prizewinning coverage of the Three Mile Island accident, to tell this harrowing story. Fukushima combines a fast-paced, riveting account of the tsunami and the nuclear emergency it created with an explanation of the science and technology behind the meltdown as it unfolded in real time.

The narrative also extends to other severe nuclear accidents to address both the terrifying question of whether it could happen elsewhere and how such a crisis can be averted in the future.

©2014 Union of Concerned Scientists (P)2014 Audible Inc.

More from the same

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    7
  • 4 Stars
    7
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 4.5 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    8
  • 4 Stars
    4
  • 3 Stars
    2
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    6
  • 4 Stars
    5
  • 3 Stars
    3
  • 2 Stars
    1
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars

Fukushima inspired political discussion

I was hoping to learn more technical aspects of the accident in order to have my own opinion. Instead it is mostly extensive political discussion with strong emphasis on American authorities. Lector has beautiful voice but occasionally loses comprehension of long sentences that the book generously uses.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    2 out of 5 stars

Biased

The book was interesting however I do find the arguments are quite biased. As it always emphasises the worst effects and idea "That ALL radionuclides are dangerous" It's ment to be written by Scientists so; the types of isotopes, half life , decay energy/rate and types of energy (Alpha, Beta, Gamma) don't mean much then? However it is a good listen if you remember to account for this

Sort by:
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Eduards J. Vucins
  • 11-05-14

Internal workings of the NRC

What disappointed you about Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster?

Half the book was on the NRC.

Did the narration match the pace of the story?

Narration was good but the authors were clearly writers only with a poor understanding of the technical details. A much better understanding of the event can be obtained from the Chapter in James Mahafey's book Atomic Accidents: A History and the Robert P.Gale MD book Radiation-What it is & What You Need to Know .

What reaction did this book spark in you? Anger, sadness, disappointment?

Unless you are a policy wonk, you will be bored by half of the book.

10 of 11 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Eric
  • 08-07-16

Political Essay

The authors' biases made it hard for me to enjoy the story. This was more a political essay than a historical account.

10 of 12 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 06-06-18

Heavily biased anti nuclear energy propaganda.

While the recounting of the disaster at Fukushima is well researched and compellingly told, it is tarnished by the authors unabashed bias against anything to do with nuclear power.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    1 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    1 out of 5 stars
  • andrew velasquez
  • 09-02-17

anti-renewable energy propoganda.

bought the book to learn about nuclear incidents. all I got was fear mongering and half facts.

2 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • gc dunn
  • 03-08-18

Unbelievable

Great story! Includes a great back story. Excellent narration. Keeps your attention start to finish.

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Bonnie S.
  • 12-06-18

What I didn't know, Truth must be told

This was a great book, more peope should know more. This does just that. It was just the right amount technical detail. Was not hard to follow, one thing it should of ended better. There has to be more. I would recomend.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 26-02-18

Good Treatment of Accident and Regulatory Climate

Good resource for an overall picture of what happened and how the nuclear culture set the stage. However, it could have had more detail. For example, Fukushima Daini was an interesting part of the story and could have been discussed in more depth.

  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    3 out of 5 stars
  • Tim
  • 12-04-14

Commission Study on Nuclear

Reading about the Japanese earthquake in 2011 is like reading a commission study from the government on how to prepare. "Fukushima" is a technical read. If you want to know what happened to the people that lived near the power plant, then this book is not for you. There is no personal stories from local people, and their after effect at being exposed to radiation from the power plant.

This book is very rigid by explaining the Japanese government and Tepco. Both parties were not prepared for the disaster. They still need more regulations in nuclear power plants.

In the United States, we have been leaning toward to nuclear for our energy consumption. The disaster in Fukushima should be a warning for all of us that alternative energy should be develop before a using the source for a bomb.

We still talk about Chernobyl as if it was headline news. There will be another book out on Fukushima and the people. As for my current read,I enjoyed the technical aspect of this disaster, but unless we get to hear from the citizens that are still fearing their life after the meltdown, this book is something from the government that no one will read, unless it happens to them and to us.

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazon Customer
  • 23-05-16

Well done

Non-biased. Well presented summary of events and the complex implications, then and now. I was there as a responder. I appreciated the view from other perspectives. Well done.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars
  • Topher
  • 16-04-16

Good read for people in the nuclear power industry

Very interesting, only a few technical inaccuracies, great lessons for people in the industry. This book does a good job highlighting the interaction between the Japanese nuclear power oversight, the power company, and other nations' attempts to help after the tsunami.

1 of 3 people found this review helpful