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Footsteps at the Lock

Narrated by: Barnaby Edwards
Length: 7 hrs and 15 mins
4 out of 5 stars (24 ratings)

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Summary

When two brothers, potential heirs, go missing on a canoe trip on the River Thames, private investigator Miles Bredon and his friend Inspector Leyland are called in to investigate what might have happened to the pair. The accumulation of evidence - including cyphers, fake photos, and drugs - leads to a much discussion and speculation, but only a recreation of events will help them to solve the mystery.

©2012 Ronald Knox (P)2012 Audible Ltd

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  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars
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    3 out of 5 stars

Interesting

Good characters. Spare but appreciatively lovely descriptions of the river. The sequencing of the story was told well but the plot concerning the two cousins was not very credible. A map of the lock and surrounds would have helped the reader to follow the machinations of the parties (how does one do that for an audio book?) altogether enjoyable and I would read another book by this author.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

A fair play who-dunnit, maybe too fair play

I'm not the smartest guy but I worked this story out half way through. This could show it is too simple, but it could also show it is a real fair play mystery that you have a chance of working out from the clues you are given.
Even if the mystery is a bit naff, the characters make up for it as te very small cast lets the story really flesh them out.
It tries to deconstruct mystery a little but but to a lesser extent than many of Knox's other works. The fourth wall breaking of the author who discusses the tropes he is going to use with the audience makes the book seem more modern than it is.
At times, the author gets a bit preachy with his morals but what do you expect from a book written by a priest?