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Fear

Essential Wisdom for Getting Through the Storm
Narrated by: Dan Woren
Length: 4 hrs and 18 mins
4.6 out of 5 stars (85 ratings)

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Summary

Without fear, we are able to see more clearly our connections to others. Without fear, we have more room for understanding and compassion. Without fear, we are truly free.

Most of us live in a constant state of fear - of our past, of illness and aging and death, and of losing the things we treasure most. But it doesn't have to be this way, promises Zen master and Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh.

Drawing on a lifetime of mindfulness in action, Thich Nhat Hanh shows us how to use the practice of living in the present to acknowledge and embrace our fears, recognize their origins, and render them powerless. The world-renowned Zen teacher guides us through practical exercises for transforming fear into clarity. The worries of the past and the anxiety of the future disappear as we discover the power of the present moment. Not only are we are able to handle challenging emotions as they arise, but we can summon feelings of well-being and contentment, no matter what the unknown may bring.

Rooted in the moment, we have the capacity to restore balance and happiness and be present with what is beautiful and affirming inside us and around us, every day.

©2012 Thich Nhat Hanh (P)2012 HarperCollins Publishers

What listeners say about Fear

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    3 out of 5 stars
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Dissapointed

Any additional comments?

Dissapointed - had enjoyed his other books and was hoping it would go into the emotions and thought process behind fear which it touches on, but relates back to much into being Mindful, which I appreciate is a great tool, just not what I was hoping for

4 people found this helpful

  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars

Excellent!

Beautifully narrated and very thought provoking. I have already listened twice and found the meditation exercises very helpful.

3 people found this helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars

Fear : Thich Nhat Hanh

This book will help you understand and face your fears, and so eventually reach a place of fearlessness and freedom. From this place of liberty you are then free to enjoy your life. This great teacher's writing has changed my life, if you let his words seep into your consciousness as you read, the same will happen for you. Very simply written and easy to understand. Let this man's words into your life, you will not regret it.

5 people found this helpful

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Treasure trove!

Lovely book, full of Thich Nhat Hanh's invaluable, brave wisdom. Always sensible, always useful, these teachings are magnificent.

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good book

loved it, gets you closer to your inner pain making it likelier that you'll see yourself with compassion

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  • RB
  • 01-11-15

Says it all

Liked the content form or substance whatever else one may call it
Venerable TNH just is ,was and will be
May everything and everyone be happy irrespective of day or night

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  • Virginia
  • 04-10-13

A great great book

First let me clarify that this is a Buddhist book filled with the teachings of the Buddha ... i am not a Buddhist yet i found it extremely helpful ... it's kind of a next step after one digs deep into one's self (introspection work) ... it helps with getting over the pain and suffering (after being acknowledged and experienced that is )
I found it much more "REAL" than the self -help books that usually left me lost and frustrated ... i highly recommended
note: the narration was excellent

25 people found this helpful

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  • Platitudinus
  • 20-01-15

Here Comes The Dark Side!

Thinking you need a pill, drink, smoke or other distraction to get you through? Listen to Thay as you freak out, because freaking out from fear is what we do. We are all one when it comes to fear. Let us sit together and rest under the Tree of mindfulness with Thay to encounter our fear as precious human beings.

21 people found this helpful

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  • eugene
  • 11-02-13

Clinging to the monk

Would you listen to Fear again? Why?

yes, the content is vast

What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

The narrator is good however, much can be learned through listening to the sound of Thich Nhat Hanhs voice.

13 people found this helpful

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  • Shelly Ahlschlager
  • 24-02-15

Great Book

Learned simple breathing and mantra exercises to be more mindful and let things go more easily. Be Present
Be Still.... Wait

11 people found this helpful

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 16-03-17

Incredibly insightful and transformative

Thich Nhat Hanh reveals how important mindfulness practice is for cultivating joy and happiness. When we don't practice mindfulness, we suffer - we are afraid and we disconnect from others. When we understand what is causing our emotions, such as our anger and fear, we can better understand ourselves and others. He also highlights how important it is to model mindfulness practice for our children and others that interact with us in our day-to-day lives. He is the best teacher of all because he teaches us to find the teacher within.

4 people found this helpful

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  • Benjamin
  • 06-08-20

Buddhism for the 21st Century

This is an important book. Fear is part of life. There is no need to hide from it. Breathing in the moment is a key practice. Being in the present is of outmost importance. The past is gone. And the future does not exist yet. The only thing we have is the present moment. The book explains in length the importance of the energy of mindfulness and concentration to overcome fear. “When we suppress our fearful thoughts, they continue to fester there in the dark. We are driven to consume (food, alcohol, movies, etc.) in an attempt to forget and keep those thoughts from surfacing in our conscious mind. Running away from our fear ultimately makes us suffer and makes others suffer, and our fear only grows stronger.” The book also introduces an interesting concept: the interbeing, meaning things are not, they do not stand alone, but they do exist because of other concepts exist at the same time. “When we look deeply into a sheet of paper, we see that it’s full of everything in the cosmos: the sunshine, the trees, the clouds, the earth, the minerals, everything—except for one thing. It’s empty of one thing only: a separate self. The sheet of paper cannot be by itself alone. That is why the word inter-be can be more helpful than the word be. In fact, to be means to inter-be. The sheet of paper cannot be without the sunshine, cannot be without the forest. The sheet of paper has to inter-be with the sunshine, to inter-be with the forest.” There is a very interesting chapter that resonates with the moment the world is living as I write this (August 2020, covid pandemic). We need to make sure ALL people, all groups are safe, if we want to have a safe life. This is interesting, and I could not agree more, because nobody wins, unless everybody wins. I appreciated when he spoke about how the TV can be a drug, and the classic concept in meditation of the blue sky (I learned this from Headspace), meaning when you look up, sometimes there are clouds (trouble), but you know there is always a blue sky beyond the clouds. “Television can be used as a kind of drug. When the suffering in us is too much to bear, we sometimes turn on the television set to forget our pain. It fills our living room with images and sounds. Even if what we’re watching isn’t satisfying, we often don’t have the courage to turn off the TV. Why? Because although it’s uninteresting or even disturbing, we think it’s better than going home to ourselves and touching the pain within. Distraction is the policy for many of us. Some of us choose to live in a television-free zone, like we have non-smoking zones or nondrinking zones. But many others of us practice television watching or video game playing to cover up our discomfort.” “In our society, there is so much fear, suffering, violence, despair, confusion. But there is also, at the same time, the beautiful blue sky. Sometimes the blue sky reveals itself to us entirely. Sometimes it reveals half of itself, sometimes just a little bit of blue peeks through, and sometimes none at all. Storms, clouds, and fog hide the blue sky. The kingdom of heaven can be hidden by a cloud of ignorance or by a tempest of anger, violence, and fear. But if we practice mindfulness, it’s possible to be aware that even if the weather is very foggy, cloudy, or stormy, the blue sky is always there for us above the clouds. Remembering this keeps us from sinking into despair.” The last chapter (the longest) is more of a 'compendium' of some basic Buddhist concepts and different techniques explained in order to practice mindful meditation. It talks about impermanence, which is an essential philosophical concept in Buddhism. Favorite quotes: “The only way to ease our fear and be truly happy is to acknowledge our fear and look deeply at its source.” “The Buddha taught that when we call up and get in touch with the truth that we cannot escape old age and death, our fear—and the foolish things we do to try not to feel it—will cease.” “When you let go mentally, you relax physically, because the body and the mind are two aspects of one reality.” “Concentration means you keep the insight alive for a long time. It’s not just a flash; that’s not enough to liberate you. So in your daily life, you keep that insight of nonself, of emptiness, of impermanence alive.” “A feeling is just a feeling. And you are much more than that feeling. We shouldn’t let ourselves be carried away by a feeling, even a pleasant one, much less an unpleasant one. We just practice recognition of the feeling.” “Nirvana literally means cooling, the putting out of flames; in Buddhism, it refers to extinction of the afflictions brought about by our wrong perceptions.” “Don’t allow yourself to be overwhelmed by despair. You can make good use of every minute and every hour of your daily life.” “The more we practice, the more we are gentle with our fear and are able to embrace it, the more the fear goes away.”

1 person found this helpful

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  • Crystal Scott
  • 23-06-17

Could not have come at a more perfect time

I am in an area unfamiliar to me and going through a brand-new break up of a long-term relationship that requires moving to this new area with my son. I've been worried about being worried, and my friend sent me a picture of this book that she thought would help me. It will. I plan to listen to the last hour regularly so that I can learn how to do self-care. I've always wondered what the steps are, and this book will help me with those.

3 people found this helpful

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  • L
  • 10-04-17

Great read!

This is the third or fourth book I've read by TNT, and while not my favorite, I valued this book's insight and simple approach to shifting one's perspective.

1 person found this helpful

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  • Raelene
  • 09-09-13

Why a narrator?

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

No, principally because of the narrator whose smooth delivery left me unmoved.

What could Thich Nhat Hanh have done to make this a more enjoyable book for you?

I'd much rather listen to the author himself - even though his delivery can be difficult at times, it carries so much more than having someone else reading from a text.

Could you see Fear being made into a movie or a TV series? Who should the stars be?

No

10 people found this helpful

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  • D. McIntyre
  • 12-10-18

Helpful but convoluted at the same time

Helpful and insightful but very in-depth with the training of a monk the observations can be over the heads of lay people.

2 people found this helpful