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Dimensions of Scientific Thought

Narrated by: Edwin Newman
Length: 2 hrs and 43 mins
Categories: Non-fiction, Physics
2.5 out of 5 stars (3 ratings)

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Summary

We think of science as a way of discovering certainty in an unpredictable world; experiments are designed to objectively measure cause and effect. Yet science often produces more new questions than answers, and all scientific theories can change with new and better observations. Scientific philosophers say that "objective" observations actually depend heavily on the observer's intuition and point of view. This audio presentation explores the power and limitations of this special type of knowledge called science.

The Science and Discovery series recreates one of history's most successful journeys: 4,000 years of scientific efforts to better understand and control the physical world. Science has often challenged and upset conventional wisdom or accepted practices; this is a story of vested interests and independent thinkers, experiments and theories, change and progress. Aristotle, Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Newton, Darwin, Einstein, and many others are featured.

Don't miss the rest of the Science and Discovery series.
©1993 Carmichael and Carmichael, Inc. and Knowledge Products (P)1993 Carmichael and Carmichael, Inc. and Knowledge Products

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  • Bill Pierson
  • 04-09-18

Not what I thought

I was expecting a history of scientific thought. There is some of that but there is as much about relativistic arguments within science. These arguments appear to try and persuade the reader regarding what is knowable and limitations in science. Then, the book concludes by affirming that science is responsible for the advances in civilization. So I was left confused on the position of the author.