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Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

Narrated by: January Lavoy
Length: 1 hr and 1 min
4.8 out of 5 stars (242 ratings)

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Summary

From the best-selling author of Americanah and We Should All Be Feminists comes a powerful new statement about feminism today - written as a letter to a friend.

I have some suggestions for how to raise Chizalum. But remember that you might do all the things I suggest, and she will still turn out to be different from what you hoped, because sometimes life just does its thing. What matters is that you try.

In We Should All Be Feminists, her eloquently argued and much admired essay of 2014, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie proposed that if we want a fairer world we need to raise our sons and daughters differently. Here, in this remarkable new book, Adichie replies by letter to a friend's request for help on how to bring up her newborn baby girl as a feminist. With its 15 pieces of practical advice, it goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the 21st century.

©2017 Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie (P)2017 HarperCollins Publishers Limited

Critic reviews

Praise for Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie:
"The book I'd press into the hands of girls and boys, as an inspiration for a future 'world of happier men and happier women who are truer to themselves'." (Books of the Year, Independent)
"A writer with a great deal to say." ( The Times)
"Here is a new writer endowed with the gift of ancient storytellers." (Chinua Achebe)
"Adiche [has] virtuosity, boundless empathy and searing social acuity." (Dave Eggers)
"Adichie is terrific on human interactions.... Adichie's writing always has an elegant shimmer to it.... Wise, entertaining and unendingly perceptive." ( Independent on Sunday)
"[Adichie] is recording the history of her country. She is fortunate - and we, her readers, are even luckier." (Edmund White)

What listeners say about Dear Ijeawele, or A Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

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Just one thing missing

It was a bit disappointing as a Nigerian to listen to this particular book being read by an American woman who made little to no episode to pronounce names or places correctly but otherwise content wise and the tone and pace of the reading was excellent

10 people found this helpful

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Love the advice

Love, love love this book. I will be revisiting it each year and passing on the lessons to my daughters. My only comment with the audible version is that I wish they had found a narrator with a more Nigerian accent.

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brilliant, still needed

loved this. messages as relevant now as before worldwide. Would have loved a reader with a Nigerian accent as in Ameriicanah.

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Concise and worth a listen (even if you don’t have children)

This is such a concise book it’s more like a manifesto. I don’t have children but I loved the book and the advice. I would have preferred perhaps Chimamanda herself to read the book or at least and African woman who could pronounce the African names. But honestly the American narrator didn’t take anything away from the inspiring and empowering lessons in this book. It’s so short I think everyone should find the time to listen to this.

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Most accessible introduction to feminism

This is the best and most accessible introduction to feminism. Beautifully written. One of the best books I’ve read this year.

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Educational and insightful.

A "must read" for all, women and men alike. Note to self - need to be deliberately mindful. Unlearn many cultural and social biases.

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Loved it

Authentic and heart warming. Would have been even better if it was narrated by the author.

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Miles better than We Should All be Feminists

A feminist work that goes beyond theory or pointing out and dives into practicality, something that's missing from modern feminist books. But this is really a 3.5 because I don't agree with accepting bad behaviour (cheating) if a man would do the same if his partner cheated so that we achieve equality in that sense. It's wrong, it's a betrayal of trust and a sliding slope period. My opinion is people accept cheating because they have been defeated. Nope. Not for me. People have stayed and that's fine but I feel like that's a prison. Secondly, the narrator didn't work for me sorry. Ms Adichie should have read this herself. I could barely catch the names that the author named as her heroes because of the American accent that smothered them. Last thing, why not teach your daughter these 'jargony' feminist terms? I learned what misogyny, male chauvinism and patriarchy was from decidedly unfeminist books (former two being JR Ward's testosterone filled vampire romances and the latter being the bible) before ever learning the word feminism. It is interesting because another suggestion was to make your daughter read. Most young readers read older and these days 'jargony' terms are found in books for young readers. You don't have to explain misogyny to a five year old but I read The Color Purple when I was 11. This is not a brag but you can't underestimate a child's intelligence too quickly

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Read This

Read this if you are a woman. Read it to ypur daughters. More importantly, read this if you are a man and read it to your sons. I have bought two copies for the mothers of my god daughters. This is an important book.

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inspiring advice

inspiring words and practical advice for anyone who believes in equality for their heirs and imparting principles of equality in a manner that ensures it lasts intergenerationally. as a feminist, as a black feminist, the author speaks to the desires I have for my own daughter that I was never able to put into words.

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  • Anonymous User
  • 12-08-19

Exceptional

This book should be read by every person, of every age. It literally challenges ideals that you probably weren't even aware you had!

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  • Aimara
  • 11-02-19

wonderful

The suggestions here are present and valid for our society, girls need to be taught this to see a better future for everybody.

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  • Aline RS
  • 04-12-18

This book is incredible!

I am going to have a daughter soon, so I bought this amazing book. I think once in a while I will have to listen to it again, just to memorize all the incredible suggestions the author gives!

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  • Kimaya
  • 18-11-18

Given me plenty to think about

An ambitious list, even for those not raising a baby girl to be a feminist. I am a twenty six year old woman and even I have questions about whether I’m feminist enough or the right kind of feminist or worry that these are the wrong type of questions to be had in the first place. The suggestions in the book have made me question some of my existing patterns of thought and brought up more than a few things that I now look at with a different perspective.

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  • Jennifer T
  • 11-11-18

Lovely book and a must read for both women and men

This book has been a fantastic read and a first step into broadening my horizons not as a woman but as a human being. Often feminism has been marketed as a women-only movement, as something that benefits women while lessening men. I never agreed with that so I ended up thinking feminism was not for me. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie gives us a peak into a way of thinking that is much more modern and more into the idea of equality of all. I grew up in a small city in the centre of Italy and I was shocked finding out how much this book speaks to me about my upbringing. I will definitely recommend the book and probably buy some copies for my friends and family for Christmas. January Lavoy did a fantastic job reading the book.

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  • Amazon Customer
  • 12-09-18

A letter I will always treasure

A letter i would gladly share with my daughter. Just wish that Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie herself read the audiobook. I am sure if she did it would carry the weight it deserves.