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Summary

"That is not dead which can eternal lie, and with strange aeons even death may die."

At the time of his death in 1937, American horror writer H.P. Lovecraft was virtually unknown. The power of his stories was too great to contain, however. As the decades slipped by, his dark visions laid down roots in the collective imagination of mankind, and they grew strong. Now Cthulhu is a name known to many and, deep under the seas, Lovecraft's greatest creation becomes restless....

This volume brings together 17 masterful tales of cosmic horror inspired by Lovecraft's work. In his fiction, humanity is a tiny, accidental drop of light and life in the endless darkness of an uncaring universe a darkness populated by vast, utterly alien horrors. Our continued survival relies upon our utter obscurity, something that every fresh scientific wonder threatens to shatter.

The dazzling stories in Cthulhu Lives! show the disastrous folly of our arrogance. We think ourselves the first masters of Earth, and the greatest, and we are very badly mistaken on both counts. Within this audiobook, you'll find a lovingly-curated collection of terrors and nightmares, of catastrophic encounters to wither the body and blight the soul. We humans are inquisitive beings, and there are far worse rewards for curiosity than mere death.

The truth is indeed out there - and it hungers.

The full list of authors includes Lynne Hardy, Gabor Csigas, and Gethin A. Lynes.

©2014 Ghostwoods Books (P)2015 Ghostwoods Books

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Amateur sounding narrator make it unlistenable

Just as I said in the heading the narrator sounds far too much like someone doing this for a favour than a professional narrator

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  • Wakana
  • 28-06-20

Better than I expected.

When I started listening to it, I almost regretted not checking out the preview. Yes, I know I should before I buy it.
The narration was somewhat amateurish, gave me a bad sense from the get-go, but I stuck with it and I’m glad I did.

Stories were better than a lot of professional Cthulhu mythos stories I’ve heard out there.

In the end, although only seven hours, still worth a credit.

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Profile Image for Bastion Drake
  • Bastion Drake
  • 27-04-20

They Can't All be the Best

This is a good collection of Cthulhu mythos / Lovecraftian stories. Notably, this is a well concentrated collection. It is exceptional in that the stories are selected for plot structure, style, and subject matter. There aren't any random cthulhu parodies or weird comedies, nothing to snap you out of the mood. Unfortunately the audio quality is very poor and the narrators aren't particularly good. They actually make the collection feel more boring than it should be. I appreciated the elucidation of the word "tribute" as it pertains to the title. Overall there are better and worse related collections.

The Stories are as follows:
1. Universal Constants by Piers Beckley (slow but intriguing)
2. Elmwood by Tim Dedopulos (neutral)
3. 1884 by Michael Grey (Excellent but there is a much better and free version available at Nocturnal Transmissions)
4. Dark Waters by Adam Vidler (good)
5. Hobbstone by G.K. Lomax (long and boring)
6. Demon in Glass by E. Dane Anderson (good and interestingly entwined with a true story)
7. On the Banks of the River Jordan by John Reppion (unnecessarily long)
8. Scales from Baylor’s Eye by Helmer Gorman (not very good)
9. Ink by Iain Lowson (neutral)
10. Ike by Greg Stolze (good)
11. Of the Faceless Crowd by Gábor Csigás (A maudlin monologue that has an interesting premise but the tedious prose by the bored sounding narrator makes this one highly skippable.)
12. Coding Time by Marc Reichardt (going to have to relisten to this one before making a decision)
13. Scritch Scratch by Lynne Hardy (good but unsatisfying)
14. The Thing in the Printer by Peter Tupper (Good)
15. Visiting Rights by Joff Brown (Good)
16. The Old Ones by Jeremy Clymer (meh)
17. The Highland Air by Gethin A. Lynes (okay)