Regular price: £19.39

Membership details Membership details
  • A 30-day trial plus your first audiobook, free
  • 1 credit/month after trial – choose any book, any price
  • Easy exchanges – swap any book you don’t love
  • Keep your audiobooks, even if you cancel
  • Free, unlimited access to Audio Shows
  • After your trial, Audible is just £7.99/month
OR
In Basket

Summary

Welsh surgeon Daffyd Woodruff's life is blown apart by the arrival of unexpected news. In the remote town of Moose Creek where he lived and worked fifteen years before, he's told he fathered twins. Dafydd knows it cannot be true - but DNA tests don't lie.

From nowhere the past has a stranglehold on Daffyd, threatening to unravel everything he's built up - his marriage, his career. To make sense of the impossible he'll have to return to Moose Creek and confront demons he thought he had left behind years ago.

©2005 Kitty Sewell; (P)2009 Isis Publishing Ltd

Critic reviews

"An involving narrative, a sharply observed cast, an atmospherically evoked and unusual setting."( Guardian)

What members say

Average customer ratings

Overall

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    2
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Performance

  • 0 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0

Story

  • 0 out of 5 stars
  • 5 Stars
    0
  • 4 Stars
    0
  • 3 Stars
    0
  • 2 Stars
    0
  • 1 Stars
    0
Sort by:
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars

The ice trap

This book was of particular interest to me as I come from the UK but I was married to an Inuk and live in Canada where I have many First Nations friends.
I was glad the reader could manage a Welsh accent, but his offering American rather than Canadian accents was annoying, as was his mispronunciation of words like Metis (may-tee) which he should have researched. The story is good with a surprising sting in the tail. I wondered if the author had ever come to Canada because the speech, such as 'mighty fine' is not typical vernacular north of the border. A good 'read', though.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful