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Coding Languages Halfway: 6 Books in 1

Programming in Arduino, C++, C#, Powershell, Python & SQL
Narrated by: William Bahl
Length: 9 hrs and 24 mins
5.0 out of 5 stars (56 ratings)

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Summary

Ever wanted a career in computer programming but just couldn’t fathom all the technical mumbo-jumbo? Are you a student who wants to begin their journey toward learning how all the apps and computers you’re using work and want to build your own? Or maybe you want to learn coding just for the heck of it?

Then this series is just for you!

Coding Languages Halfway gives you a comprehensive deep dive into six programming languages:

  • Arduino
  • C++
  • C#
  • Powershell
  • Python
  • SQL

This six-book series gives you in-depth, easy-to-digest lessons on the basic fundamentals of each of these coding languages. Some sample topics from each book include:

  • What is a program/sketch in Arduino?
  • The Syntax of C++
  • Variables and Types of the C# Language
  • Working with Strings and Quotes in Powershell
  • Conditional Statement in Python
  • Commands that you should learn in SQL

It also provides newbies with techniques, best practices, and applications of what they have learned, so they can be on their way to mastering these programming languages to enable them to start a career and enhance skills or open doors for opportunities! 

©2018 Zach Webber (P)2018 Zach Webber

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Getting it right in your head!

This podcast is going to be spent rather talking about one of the primary foundations of programming: logic. Logic is the very basis of everything that occurs within computer programming and you don’t properly understand programming if you don’t understand logic. Logic is properly defined through the discipline of discrete math and it can, in fact, be seen as an extension of this discipline. For example, discrete math defines and solidifies many of the underlying concepts regarding logic. For this reason, you can see this chapter as both an introduction to logic and an introduction to discrete mathematics. These topics are absolutely foundational and critical to a proper understanding of programming and without a thorough knowledge of them, you may be able to proceed in a general manner going forward but you’ll have a hard time doing anything practical or being able to procedurally and logically break down your thoughts. First, let’s start with logic. What is logic? Logic is, in an abstract way, one’s ability to use conclusions in order to come to another conclusion. All things are based on conclusions about another thing. Therefore, all logic is then based off of prior logic.

24 people found this helpful

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Simple - Like it should be

SQL: The Utmost Intermediate Course Guide in Fundamentals and Concept of SQL Programming, let’s hope it was informative and able to provide you with the tools you need to achieve your goals, whatever they may be. This book concerns SQL as an RDBMS; however, SQL does not strictly follow the relational model. A purely relational database does not allow for some of the features of SQL. It is possible to create a purely relational database using SQL, but particular features would be ignored to do so. The next step is to continue your education by obtaining a copy of SQLite and practicing practical skills and examples from MSDN or Oracle’s ERP website. You can also find extensive examples and lessons at your local public library.

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I am feeling Good , this is totally Cool

After finishing the Programming Course with William Bahl has been an important cornerstone in my journey to dive into the world of programming. I want to learn more, deeper and different languages as well. And the author Zach Webber is a source of inspiration with his in-depth knowledge of Coding. Thanks

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Enjoyed immensely!

Part of this may be due to my prior experience with programming, but the course material seems to be very easy to follow and the narrator has explained everything very well in a way that beginner's shouldn't have a tough time understanding at all.

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Extremely didactic.

I have zero experience with coding or computer science, but I have little difficulty understanding this course so far, and with practice I can remember the new "methods" very quickly thanks to clear and simple examples (I'm about to finish section 4).

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Again, thanks Boris and good work.

Bahl has done a good job of explaining the "why" not only the what and how. For those with programming experience, the course could be speed up however since the course caters to those with less experience the pace is slower. It's not a deal breaker though since you can advance the audio anyway.

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Easiest thing to apply to programming

There are a number of different programming languages out there, each of them filling their various niche or serving their various purposes. Some programming languages pop up as a result of their time and eventually fall out of use, such as COBOL, and others still will pop up because nothing like them exists yet and necessity is the mother of invention, like Lisp. Others still will pop up as the result of hobbyists tinkering, like Python. In order to understand what caused C# to eventually come up, we first have to talk about a language called C. C# is a C-derived language. This means that a lot of the coding conventions present in C# ultimately derive from C. So what is C, then? C was a language that was invented in the 1970s at AT&T’s Bell Laboratories. It was the first language of its type to really be as straightforward as it was and offer a combination of extreme versatility and interaction with the computer as well as a relatively easy to read interface on the programmer’s end. This, alongside its easy to understand and practical text The C Programming Language, would cause the language to catch on. What really made it catch fire, though, was the fact that at the same Bell Labs, a popular operating system called Unix was being developed. Unix was rewritten in C in order to make it runnable on any system that can run a C compiler, rather than having to port the operating system code to every single machine. Since it is both easier to write a compiler for new hardware than to write an entire operating system, this offered an incentive both for universities to start teaching compiler courses to students in order to compile Unix as well as generally creating a positive selling point for Unix, with it being supported by an increasingly popular compiler and programming language.

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Cheers

was looking for new hobby, i thought Programming might be boring but i I was wrong, u are doing amazing job, so far so good

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Uniquely brilliant

In order to better understand pointers, you’re also going to have to understand how variables and values work in terms of the computer’s memory and hardware. All data that the computer manipulates over the course of a program’s execution is stored within the random access memory. These values are stored randomly throughout the memory, fittingly, and then accessed as needed. The random access memory is composed of what you can visualize as a long series of boxes in which values can be stored. These values are then stored in these boxes. The computer has an idea of where each of these boxes is. Think of lots in a city. Every house has an address and is divided into its own lot. You can tell which lot is which by referring to its address. This is much like these small spaces in the computer’s memory, which are referred to - fittingly - as memory addresses. A variable is ultimately a reference to a given value at an address, not to the value contained within the address. When you manipulate a variable, you manipulate therefore the copy of the value found at that address. You only change this value by manipulating the variable directly.

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Teaching the unteachable... Me...

The first thing we’re going to talk about is what Arduino is. Arduino is a microprocessor board originally developed in Italy. The hardware of Arduino is all open-source, and there’s a huge developer community that has developed around it. As a result, it’s become an immensely popular circuit board used in a huge number of tinkering projects all around the world. These tinkering projects spread across all sorts of different industries and concepts. The goal of Arduino is to give people an easy way to understand and tinker with the fundamentals of computing and computer-based hardware without having to shell out the expensive costs that come with normal computing. This book contains proven steps and strategies on how to become a fantastic Arduino programmer from the base that we already built in the beginner book. However, even if you didn’t get that book, don’t worry; we’re going to spend a chapter getting you up to speed so that you feel confident jumping into the higher level knowledge further in the book. Arduino is an extremely cool and powerful tool for people who were born tinkerers. You’ll be able to create really awesome programs and projects that are powered by a tiny computer. The world of hardware is now your oyster. This book is going to teach you to harness the full potential of the Arduino so that you can be an absolute sketch-master.

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  • Craig
  • 24-06-20

Perfect for right brainers

Introduced in the first version of Unix in 1971, and written by Ken Thompson, Thompson Shell was a simple command interpreter. It was not designed for scripting but introduced several features to the command-line interface. You cannot talk about scripting or shell programs at all without talking about Ken Thompson and his peers working for Bell Labs in the 1970's. Bell Labs hired Thompson in 1966, and initially, he worked on Multics, an operating system developed at MIT in coordination with Bell Labs and General Electric. Out of necessity since Bell Labs decided not to continue the Multics partner project, Thompson wrote some tools that later developed into UNIX because of his desire to play a video game that he wrote while working on Multics. While working on UNIX, it quickly became apparent to Thompson that his new file system needed a programming language. He and Dennis Ritchie co-authored B language which is the precursor to the C programming language. Not only did Ken Thompson develop Unix and its first system programming language, but he also is responsible for the creation of the concept of computer processes and device files. In Windows, a device is anything that interfaces with a device driver, while in Unix these are called device files because they appear in the file system as regular files. However, as time passed the functionality of Thompson's Shell program in Unix became insufficient for the programming needs of Bell Labs, and thus others at Bell began to modify Thompson's shell to accommodate the needs of their team. This transition to a desire for the shell program to accommodate the needs of programmers was evident in v6.0 of Unix. Version 7.0 is where Unix matures into a more refined application which now includes the replacement for Thompson's Shell, called Bourne Shell, named after its creator Stephen Bourne also of Bell Labs. The Bourne Shell or “/sh” is still in current day Unix systems of all kinds. There have been numerous features added since its inception in 1979, and a complete revamp called Bourne-Again Shell or “/bash” which was designed to be more user-friendly with features such as auto-complete and numerous other quality of life enhancements for the power-user.

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  • Melvin Tice
  • 25-06-20

Get it a.s.a.p. !

The simple fact is that programming is hard. There’s a whole lot of nuance to it that can make it more complicated than it may seem like it should be. This is just because you either haven’t learned conventions yet or you haven’t completely mastered the logic. Once you master the logic underlying programming, everything else is smooth sailing. Don’t misunderstand, though; whether you’re working in C++ or any other language, there’s always going to be something new for you to learn or some new paradigm for you to try to pick up. Programming is not, nor will it ever be, about knowing everything that there is to know; rather, it’s about learning everything that you can learn. There are going to be times where you want to pull your hair out, but what’s important is that you keep going no matter what and always try to improve. Even when you encounter those annoying bugs that just seem to not go away no matter what, you just have to tough it out. There are a huge number of projects available for you to try on the internet if you decide that you would like to look at somebody else’s code. This is perhaps the best way to learn. Find some sort of project that interests you and then work on reading its code and breaking it down. For example, if you wanted to write a web browser, it would serve you well to look at the WebKit codebase. If you want to be a game developer, take a crack at some of the numerous game engines written in C++. If you want to work on operating systems, then look at open-source Linux releases and examine their code. More than that, you can also start your own projects. When you’re learning to program, the world is truly your oyster.

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  • Lillian
  • 28-06-19

The clarity is out of this world

The quality is great , items are explained in a very lucid, and incremental. The clarity is out of this world . It just can't get any better . A very good course to quickly rehash some of the most crucial subjects you learned and probably forgot from your Coding Languages course back in the school years ago.

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  • Jack
  • 28-06-19

This course will really get you in there.

I tried other books in programming, but this audiobook here is very enlightening. Every little thing that was confusing in other courses suddenly becomes clear in here. I recommend to everyone who has no experience in coding. This course will really get you in there. Just remember to code at least daily, because this is the only way to make sure you progress. puts "Thank you Zach Webber (incredible, awesome and whatever else you came up with :D!"

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  • Jessica Miller
  • 25-06-20

Interested in Learnng Java? This Book’s for You!

Java was very familiar to people who worked with C++ and C, and gained a lot of popularity for its versatility and the fact that it was write-once, run-anywhere, meaning that a Java program written on one computer can be run on any computer that can run the Java Runtime Environment. This is one essential difference between Java/C# and languages like C++ and C; they’re interpreted languages, meaning that they’re written and then run within a runtime environment or what is essentially a virtual machine on the computer. This is compared to C++ and C which are compiled languages, meaning that what you write in them is directly translated into language that the computer can read, which means that C and C++ programs only work on systems that C/C++ code will compile for. If it doesn’t compile for a given system, then those users of that operating system are basically out of luck.

19 people found this helpful

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  • Lindsey
  • 28-06-19

Mr. Bahl speaks fluently.

The audio course should be taken at the beginning of studying Coding Languages. In my opinion, it is ideal for warming up. Mr. Bahl speaks fluently. He never patronizes while teaching. The course is extremely educational. I think both advanced and beginner engineers should enroll it.

18 people found this helpful

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  • Mattie
  • 27-06-20

What is better than that

Arduino is massively extensible and there are a number of different hardware modules that can be used with your Arduino board. These peripherals attach to the Arduino and send data to and from the Arduino through what are called pins. There are two kinds of pins: digital and analog. These are controlled through programs which run on the Arduino. These programs are called sketches. While Arduino programs can be written in many different languages, this book in particular focuses on the most common language for writing Arduino code - C. C is a very popular programming language historically and it’s also incredible for pulling off the very specific hardware requirements that the Arduino presents. The Arduino by nature doesn’t have a whole lot of processing power, so it’s important that there’s a language that is close enough to the hardware level that it can really easily work with data on the very low level that the Arduino demands, since the Arduino needs programs that don’t use much processing power or memory at all. Through the modules and accessories that one may connect to an Arduino, one is able to do a number of different things. This is why Arduino is a tinkerer’s dream; you can do a whole lot for a very low price.

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  • Raji
  • 03-02-19

recommended

I am new to SQL, c++, python, powershell and I don't have background knowledge about it. I easily grab this book for me to learn about it and I never regretted it.

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  • Samantha Brown
  • 28-06-20

We need more coding books like this!

This book contains proven steps and strategies on how to learn C++, simple as that. I’ve helped a lot of people to learn how to program in my day. In this time, I’ve learned where a lot of other methods tend to fall flat. In order to give you the best learning experience possible, I’ve decided to culminate all of my experience and the things that I’ve learned into this book. The end result is an engaging read that teaches you not only about C++ but about programming and logic in general. The truth is that programming is a state of mind, and it’s only by learning this state of mind - this approach of absolute and total logic - that you’re going to learn how best to approach this beast. If you apply patience and your full self to this book, you’re going to come out of it with an in-depth understanding of various different things both about programming and about computers in general. The reason that this book is the best of its kind is that it prepares you not just to be a C++ programmer but to be a programmer in general and, more importantly, a thinker. Armed with this book, you will be prepared to tackle many different problems in the programming world. You also will feel comfortable expanding upon the knowledge that you build in this book in order to work in other realms.

15 people found this helpful

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  • Dianne
  • 28-06-19

6 Books in 1

This is just Coding Languages/algo halfway. This course is taught in Arduino, C++, C#, Powershell, Python & SQL.

15 people found this helpful