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Summary

A House for Mr. Biswas, by Nobel and Booker Prize-winning author V. S. Naipaul, is a powerful novel about one man's struggle for identity and belonging. Born into poverty, then trapped in the shackles of charity and gratitude, Mr. Biswas longs for a house he can call his own. He loathes his wife and her wealthy family, upon whom he is dependent. Finding himself a mere accessory on their estate, his constant rebellion is motivated by the one thing that can symbolize his independence. The book is striking in its lush and sensual descriptions of Trinidad and was listed as one of Time magazine's 100 Best English-Language Novels from 1923 to 2005.

©1969 V.S. Naipaul (P)2017 Naxos AudioBooks

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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  • Brian Hays
  • 04-03-18

Classic Naipaul

Another from one of the great storytellers. The sequence of events is a bit depressing, but it’s impossible to become fully involved with the characters and events.

The narrator is one of the best I’ve heard. The dialect is perfectly executed, and the timing of the dialog is good for many laughs.

Although I’ve only read it in paper, Naipaul’s “A Bend in the River” is a must read.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Saman
  • 11-12-17

Charming prose. Lovely book.

Naipaul never dissapoints in his narrative. This is a very simple story of a man who lives a fairly, short life on the fringes of poverty and amidst a patriarchal household. Many readers can be put-off by the pure absurdness of this story-line but for me as a Naipaul advocate, this is pure magic.

The protagonist, Mohun Biswas, is a dreadful character who continuously bites the hand that feeds him and wishes for grander things in life. His wishes to escape the chains of the Tulsi clan and buy a house of his own are the center pieces of the story. The novel spans the years of his life: his unhappy and tragic childhood, marriage to Sharma and the expectations of the Tulsis, children, and the continuous machinations of the sister-in-laws and brother-in-laws. Getting beaten and giving a beating is expected in the Tulsi house.

I wanted so badly for Mr. Biswas to succeed and yet, at some junctures, I wanted him to fail. That is the beauty of the story and the book. Remember the first chapter and then you will understand the rest of Mr. Biswas’s life and trials. Loved this book and the narration was pretty good too.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

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  • Tona
  • 25-01-18

Humble yet powerful...

This thoughtfully written story of of man's journey to find his place is a reflection of every man struggle. Beautifully constructed, eloquent and playful, it speaks to anyone, regardless of station, nationality, or era, trying to find their place in this world.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Liz W.
  • 11-12-17

Thoughtful story, WONDERFULLY narrated

This is a long, funny, sad, sometimes frustrating story about a man who dreams of something better. It's not an easy listen, but well worth the time invested in the end. As always, Sam Dastor brings the story to life with his narration. I could honestly listen to this guy read the phone book. He interprets the author's words beautifully.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • W Perry Hall
  • 01-07-18

Grating: Linda Richman, Fran Drescher & Sponge Bob


I expected more. While I'm certain the novel is deeper than I was able to read and listen to, I'd like to think it's difficult to fault someone (me) for being so distracted by the protagonist Mr. Biswas' narrative voice, which is undoubtedly one of the most annoying, cringe-inducing in all of literature.

Think: SNL's 'Coffee Talk' with special guests Fran Drescher and Sponge Bob Squarepants.

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  • Anonymous4564
  • 06-10-17

BORING, long, and pointless.

This was boring and depressing. I was glad when it was finally over. Felt like it took a million years. Also, I thought the white guy imitating an Indian accent was slightly irritating.

2 of 6 people found this review helpful