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Summary

In Christ the Way, the Truth, the Life (John 14:6), William Kelly clearly brings out the Gospel message and the centrality of Christ in all things. The Lord Jesus Christ said, "I am the Way, the Truth and the Life, no man cometh unto the Father, but by me".

The Way - man is lost, and the world is as much of a wilderness as the sands of Arabia to a traveler who has lost his way. The Lord Jesus Christ came to seek and to save the lost. Jesus says, "I am the Way", and it is sure, unfailing. He is the way. We have nothing to do but to take the way.

The Truth - the truth is the revelation of God, the manifestation of everything else, in Christ. In short he manifests everyone and everything exactly as each is.

The Life - how deeply we need the life of Christ in order that we may live to God. How plain it is that the whole practical walk of believers flows from life in Christ. God declares that he has given me, if a believer, another nature, new life in Christ. Nicodemus had to learn that he not only needed to hear what Jesus had to teach - he needed to be born afresh and have eternal life.

©2015 eChristian (P)2015 eChristian

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  • J
  • 05-08-18

The Raven



No soul needs to end up trapped under the shadow of the raven as in The Raven (Edgar Allen Poe). As in:

‘Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—

Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.

Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before;

Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore;
Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door—
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door—
            Perched, and sat, and nothing more.’

Why not? Well, because the writer implores this question:

—‘tell me truly, I implore—
Is there—is there balm in Gilead?—tell me—tell me, I implore!"’

The answer to this is ‘Yes’.
            
Today it can be understood the Raven’s answer is actually apt to the question that follows:

‘But the Raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
Nothing farther then he uttered—not a feather then he fluttered—
Till I scarcely more than muttered "Other friends have flown before—
On the morrow he will leave me, as my Hopes have flown before."
            Then the bird said "Nevermore”.’

Nevermore need our hopes leave us.
Hope in the balm from Gilead is still with us. Both Elijah’s and a 21st century firm scientific proof of God’s existence are with us.