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Summary

Here, for the first time, in his new book The Rage Against God, Peter Hitchens, brother of prominent atheist Christopher Hitchens, chronicles his personal journey through disbelief into a committed Christian faith.

With unflinching openness and intellectual honesty, Hitchens describes the personal loss and philosophical curiosity that led him to burn his Bible at prep school and embrace atheism in its place. From there, he traces his experience as a journalist in Soviet Moscow and the critical observations that left him with more questions than answers - and more despair than hope for how to live a meaningful life.

With first-hand insight into the blurring of the line between politics and the church, Hitchens reveals the reasons why an honest assessment of atheism cannot sustain disbelief in God. In the process, he provides hope for all believers who, in the words of T. S. Eliot, may discover, "[T]he end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we started and know the place for the first time."

©2010 Peter Hitchens (P)2015 Audible, Inc.

What members say

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  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars
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    4 out of 5 stars

Good to hear theistic intelligence

Although the recording leaves a lot to be desired it is nice to listen to a pin sharp intellect pierce some holes in what have always seemed to me the simplest and most dogmatic of the 'new wave aethist' argument's. This book is a welcome break if you want a different point of view to what the cult of atheism declaring, although it is not brave enough to tackle anything particularly new or hard.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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    5 out of 5 stars
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Very interesting and well read

Made something that could be made very complex, very clear and easy to understand, credit to both the writing and he performance

4 of 4 people found this review helpful

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Superb

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

Yes. This is a brilliant summary of the decline of faith, particularly in the U.K and the reasons for it. Engaging, intelligent and informed, this is an important book and a refreshing change from the slew of smug, atheistic diatribes that are so popular.

What did you like best about this story?

Peter Hitchens expertly exposes the deliberate undermining of Christianity and its consequences. While the fashionable, including his own brother, have revelled in mocking God, Peter explains how he too made that mistake (having been at one stage a Marxist). Not satisfied with the shallow, insufficient and hopeless worldview of atheism, he turned around. This is an excellent audiobook

What about Peter Hitchens’s performance did you like?

People have different tastes when it comes to voices but I thoroughly enjoyed Peter's narration - so much so that when I finished I immediately bought another of his books.

Any additional comments?

If you want to be fashionable listen to C.Hitchens, if you want the truth try P. Hitchens.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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  • Peter
  • Birmingham, West Midlands United Kingdom
  • 22-10-16

Someone talking sense

This is a very helpful book in understanding the ideological impulses of the left. If you are wondering why the left has such huge blind spots, it's for you.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

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Misses the point

At no point did he explain why he became a Christian. He mentions God but not Jesus.

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No defence

An interesting and informed comment on the likelihood that godless societies will probably be as ruthless and open to abuse as religious ones. However there is no real defence of the supernatural claims of religion or of its various dogmas. The in depth treatment of Russia as a precursor and good example of a secular society is baffling and would be refuted by his brother anyway. And no thought given to the USA which is the most obvious and successful secular state which does rather better than the USSR on Liberty and freedom. This is the country his brother chose to stay in and become a citizen of after all. Again no effort to claim that the claims of the Christian religion are actually TRUE!

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Very good. Well worth listening to.

Well worth the effort and time. More relevant to than when it first came out