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Christopher Wilton

  • 14
  • reviews
  • 85
  • helpful votes
  • 145
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  • The Pale Horseman

  • The Last Kingdom Series, Book 2
  • By: Bernard Cornwell
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Keeble
  • Length: 14 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 971
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 896
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 890

A Saxon raised by Vikings. A pagan fighting for a Christian King. The conflict at the heart of a hero will be played out in the fight for England. It is 877. Across the kingdoms of Britain the Danes are gaining strength. Uhtred of Bebbanburg, a pagan warrior, must decide who he will align with: the Vikings who raised him or Alfred, King of the West Saxons.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • great narrator

  • By Diana Boskma on 04-01-18

Pretty darn good sequel.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-12-15

While the first novel in the series covers the conquest of the anglo-saxon kingdoms, this novel covers the build up to the fight back of Wessex.

It could be argued that nothing particularly historical happens in this story, except for a few apocryphal anecdotes. But this is where Bernie C excels as a story teller and keeps you engaged in Uhtred's story.

The title didn't grab me as much, as it clearly refers to the primary antagonist (or at least the climactic antagonist). But hell, it's good and Keeble's narration still holds up well.

I listened to it over the course of a weekend and I'm even more hyped to watch the TV series now. Definitely going to get it for Yuletide this year while we engage in our pagan feasting.

Hail Thor, Hail Odin!!

  • The Last Kingdom

  • The Last Kingdom Series, Book 1
  • By: Bernard Cornwell
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Keeble
  • Length: 13 hrs and 28 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,279
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,174
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,175

The first book in a brand-new series, The Last Kingdom is set in England during the reign of King Alfred. Uhtred is an English boy, born into the aristocracy of ninth-century Northumbria. Orphaned at 10, he is captured and adopted by a Dane and taught the Viking ways. Yet Uhtred's fate is indissolubly bound up with Alfred, King of Wessex, who rules over the only English kingdom to survive the Danish assault. The struggle between the English and the Danes and the strife between christianity and paganism is the background to Uhtred's growing up.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fate is unstoppable

  • By A D MCCLENAGHAN on 13-12-14

Curious choice of prose-style, but it works brilliantly.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-11-15

I was a little put off at first when I realised that the story would be told retrospectively by the hero, as a chronicle of his life.

However, this didn't detract from the enjoyment and the narrator's performance even enhances it for the most part.

It's an interesting period of English history I knew very little about before starting the book.

Very different from Sharpe, which I'm more familiar with, but on the whole still excellent.

I will definitely be purchasing the next in the series, as long a the narration remains good.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • The Mortal Immortal

  • By: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley
  • Narrated by: Jack Benson
  • Length: 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    0 out of 5 stars 0
  • Story
    0 out of 5 stars 0

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was an English romantic and gothic novelist who is most famous as the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. She was married to the notable Romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. She also wrote a number of shorter "tales of the unnatural", of which "The Mortal Immortal", a story of a man who will not die, is the most famous.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Good for what it is and what it costs

  • By Christopher Wilton on 15-02-12

Good for what it is and what it costs

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-02-12

I bought this audiobook because it takes far too long for my credits to come in and because I bore easily without something new to listen to. Basically you get what's on the tin with this product. It's a short (27mins) story, written by one of the greatest female authors of all time.

The recording is done as an ensemble between three different speakers, so it has the flavour of a dramatisation. It would have got five stars but sometimes the graininess of the recording quality really lets it down. In short, listen to the sample first to make sure your ears are okay with it (it's not all that bad) and then ask yourself whether this is something you want to listen to.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Letters to a Young Contrarian

  • By: Christopher Hitchens
  • Narrated by: James Adams
  • Length: 3 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 187
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 142
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 139

In the book that he was born to write, provocateur and best-selling author Christopher Hitchens inspires future generations of radicals, gadflies, mavericks, rebels, angry young (wo)men, and dissidents. Who better to speak to that person who finds him or herself in a contrarian position than Hitchens, who has made a career of disagreeing in profound and entertaining ways.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Get God is Not Great

  • By Christopher Wilton on 19-01-12

Get God is Not Great

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-01-12

This book would've been better if I had not already read and listened to Hitchens' latter work "God Is Not Great" which features many of the same stories and anecdotes. As such I found very little novelty in this book.

If you haven't yet read/listened to God is Not Great then fair enough, you'll be in for a treat; there's a lot of interesting stuff and the format is intriguing in itself. But expect to cover a little old ground when you eventually get around to the latter (arguably more important) work.

6 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • How the Mind Works

  • By: Steven Pinker
  • Narrated by: Mel Foster
  • Length: 26 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 214
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 143
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 138

In this delightful, acclaimed bestseller, one of the world’s leading cognitive scientists tackles the workings of the human mind. What makes us rational—and why are we so often irrational? How do we see in three dimensions? What makes us happy, afraid, angry, disgusted, or sexually aroused? Why do we fall in love? And how do we grapple with the imponderables of morality, religion, and consciousness?

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • How the World Works

  • By Judy Corstjens on 31-08-15

Excellent But Long Winded

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-01-12

Having listened to "The Better Angels of Our Nature" with great pleasure, I was perhaps primed to expect too much from this earlier and equally lengthy audiobook. But where as the aforementioned kept my interest throughout, there are some parts of this book that are deeply, deeply dull to anyone but the specialist.

The second six-hour block of the book is given over entirely to optics and perception, a subject difficult enough to grasp in written words, let alone being read out aloud. - As this section drags on it becomes more and more of chore to listen to, which is a shame because there is so much in this book worth listening to on both sides of that abyss.

An editor with a bit more nerve might have insisted that Pinker truncate that section of the book which was clearly the author's person hobby horse, alas listeners will have to suffer for the sake of it.

26 of 28 people found this review helpful

  • My Sh-t Life So Far

  • By: Frankie Boyle
  • Narrated by: Angus King
  • Length: 6 hrs and 49 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 148
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 97
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 97

Ever since being brought up by The Beatles, Frankie Boyle has been a tremendous liar. Join him on his adventures with his chum Clangy The Brass Boy and laugh as he doesn’t accidentally kill a student nurse when a party gets out of hand. I don't think anyone can have written an autobiography without at some point thinking "Why would anyone want to know this shit?" I've always read them thinking "I don't want to know where Steve Tyler grew up, just tell me how many groupies he f**ked!"'

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Great Story...Shame Frankie Didn't Narrate It

  • By seagull on 06-05-13

Excellent Listening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-01-12

An insight into the soft underbelly of one of Britain's most acerbic and edgy comedians. Listeners will have fun discerning what is genuine from what is sheer hyperbole.

There's some good laughs in it as well, just when the narrative seems to lull Frankie smacks you in the chops with some bizarre observation that will make you laugh out loud and continue listening. -- Kinda like Stockholm Syndrome, you begin to empathise with your assailant.

Biography is merely the thread from which hangs the frankly disturbing, but not unintelligent, mindset of this deeply intriguing and engaging individual. I've already purchased his second book and look forward to the experience.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Philosophy for the Curious: Teach Yourself

  • By: Mark Vernon
  • Narrated by: Mark Vernon
  • Length: 2 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    2 out of 5 stars 1
  • Performance
    0 out of 5 stars 0
  • Story
    0 out of 5 stars 0

More than just a straight audiobook, this is a unique introduction to the world of Philosophy. Sit back and absorb the information you need as our panel of four leading experts guide you through all the key ideas in a series of fascinating audio discussions. Whether you're a complete beginner or a student wanting a convenient way to recap before your exams, it is guaranteed to hold your attention as the panel explores everything from Aristotle to Wollstonecraft.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not the Actual Book

  • By Christopher Wilton on 19-01-12

Not the Actual Book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-01-12

I was a little disappointed that this was not an exact transcript of the book of the same/similar name. Rather it is a set of interviews/discussions covering broadly the same topics in the same order, but at little length.

As an accompaniment to the paperback edition it probably serves its purpose well enough, but that was not what I was looking for and I only wish I'd scrutinised more of the details and listened to the preview prior to purchase.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Descartes, Bacon, and Modern Philosophy

  • By: Jeffrey Tlumak
  • Narrated by: Lynn Redgrave
  • Length: 2 hrs and 58 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2
  • Story
    3.5 out of 5 stars 2

These two great 17th-century philosophers aimed to break free of oppressive traditions. Free scientific inquiry led them to skeptically question everything, though they also tried to reconcile science with religious faith. Both Descartes and Bacon extolled the individual, arguing that the human mind can penetrate the deepest secrets of existence. Their ideas formulated the problems that would occupy philosophers for the next 300 years.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not Great

  • By Christopher Wilton on 10-11-11

Not Great

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-11

Though informative, over three-quarters of the treatment is concerned with Descartes, leaving very little room for Bacon and leaving Modern Philosophy as an after thought tacked on as a closing paragraph. There's also problems with the recording at certain points throughout making it quite irritating to listen to at times.

If you want to learn more about Descartes than Bacon this is probably good as an introduction, but don't expect much else.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • The Moral Landscape

  • By: Sam Harris
  • Narrated by: Sam Harris
  • Length: 6 hrs and 47 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 497
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 385
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 375

Sam Harris has discovered that most people, from secular scientists to religious fundamentalists, agree on one point: science has nothing to say on the subject of human values. Indeed, science’s failure to address questions of meaning and morality has become the primary justification for religious faith.The underlying claim is that while science is the best authority on the workings of the physical universe, religion is the best authority on meaning, values, morality, and leading a good life.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • The Third Horseman of the Apocalypse - Brilliant

  • By Mr. J. M. Ainsworth on 25-09-13

Excellent Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-06-11

An excellent book, very listenable, packed with the kinds of scientific details and statistical observations that make Harris so popular. I'm not (as yet) sure whether I agree with Harris' central thesis, there's some complex ideas in the book that request and require some detailed, analytical thinking that are not always the priority of a first hearing, but - gladly - it's short enough to allow for multiple readings without any major innconveniance.

9 of 10 people found this review helpful

  • Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency (Dramatised)

  • By: Douglas Adams
  • Narrated by: Harry Enfield, Billy Boyd, Andrew Sachs, and others
  • Length: 3 hrs and 37 mins
  • Original Recording
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 527
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 389
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 385

Dirk Gently has an unshakeable belief in the interconnectedness of all things, but his Holistic Detective Agency mainly succeeds in tracking down missing cats for old ladies. Then Dirk stumbles upon an old friend behaving bizarrely - and he's drawn into a four-billion-year-old mystery that must be solved if the human race is to avoid immediate extinction.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Classic Adams!

  • By Chris on 23-01-08

Sadly - no exception.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-11

I've never been much for Adams' humour and this was - sadly - no exception. Treat it as sci-fi rather than sci-fi comedy and you can get a little out of it. But not much!

Though as a Whovian I was drawn to the references to the Dr Who episodes Shada and The City of Death so cunningly recycled into the narratives conclusion. But it was not enough to make it worth my while.

0 of 11 people found this review helpful