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Christopher Wilton

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Pretty darn good sequel.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-12-15

While the first novel in the series covers the conquest of the anglo-saxon kingdoms, this novel covers the build up to the fight back of Wessex.

It could be argued that nothing particularly historical happens in this story, except for a few apocryphal anecdotes. But this is where Bernie C excels as a story teller and keeps you engaged in Uhtred's story.

The title didn't grab me as much, as it clearly refers to the primary antagonist (or at least the climactic antagonist). But hell, it's good and Keeble's narration still holds up well.

I listened to it over the course of a weekend and I'm even more hyped to watch the TV series now. Definitely going to get it for Yuletide this year while we engage in our pagan feasting.

Hail Thor, Hail Odin!!

Curious choice of prose-style, but it works brilliantly.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-11-15

I was a little put off at first when I realised that the story would be told retrospectively by the hero, as a chronicle of his life.

However, this didn't detract from the enjoyment and the narrator's performance even enhances it for the most part.

It's an interesting period of English history I knew very little about before starting the book.

Very different from Sharpe, which I'm more familiar with, but on the whole still excellent.

I will definitely be purchasing the next in the series, as long a the narration remains good.

2 people found this helpful

Good for what it is and what it costs

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-02-12

I bought this audiobook because it takes far too long for my credits to come in and because I bore easily without something new to listen to. Basically you get what's on the tin with this product. It's a short (27mins) story, written by one of the greatest female authors of all time.

The recording is done as an ensemble between three different speakers, so it has the flavour of a dramatisation. It would have got five stars but sometimes the graininess of the recording quality really lets it down. In short, listen to the sample first to make sure your ears are okay with it (it's not all that bad) and then ask yourself whether this is something you want to listen to.

2 people found this helpful

Letters to a Young Contrarian cover art

Get God is Not Great

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-01-12

This book would've been better if I had not already read and listened to Hitchens' latter work "God Is Not Great" which features many of the same stories and anecdotes. As such I found very little novelty in this book.

If you haven't yet read/listened to God is Not Great then fair enough, you'll be in for a treat; there's a lot of interesting stuff and the format is intriguing in itself. But expect to cover a little old ground when you eventually get around to the latter (arguably more important) work.

7 people found this helpful

Excellent But Long Winded

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-01-12

Having listened to "The Better Angels of Our Nature" with great pleasure, I was perhaps primed to expect too much from this earlier and equally lengthy audiobook. But where as the aforementioned kept my interest throughout, there are some parts of this book that are deeply, deeply dull to anyone but the specialist.

The second six-hour block of the book is given over entirely to optics and perception, a subject difficult enough to grasp in written words, let alone being read out aloud. - As this section drags on it becomes more and more of chore to listen to, which is a shame because there is so much in this book worth listening to on both sides of that abyss.

An editor with a bit more nerve might have insisted that Pinker truncate that section of the book which was clearly the author's person hobby horse, alas listeners will have to suffer for the sake of it.

27 people found this helpful

Excellent Listening

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-01-12

An insight into the soft underbelly of one of Britain's most acerbic and edgy comedians. Listeners will have fun discerning what is genuine from what is sheer hyperbole.

There's some good laughs in it as well, just when the narrative seems to lull Frankie smacks you in the chops with some bizarre observation that will make you laugh out loud and continue listening. -- Kinda like Stockholm Syndrome, you begin to empathise with your assailant.

Biography is merely the thread from which hangs the frankly disturbing, but not unintelligent, mindset of this deeply intriguing and engaging individual. I've already purchased his second book and look forward to the experience.

1 person found this helpful

Not the Actual Book

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-01-12

I was a little disappointed that this was not an exact transcript of the book of the same/similar name. Rather it is a set of interviews/discussions covering broadly the same topics in the same order, but at little length.

As an accompaniment to the paperback edition it probably serves its purpose well enough, but that was not what I was looking for and I only wish I'd scrutinised more of the details and listened to the preview prior to purchase.

2 people found this helpful

Not Great

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-11-11

Though informative, over three-quarters of the treatment is concerned with Descartes, leaving very little room for Bacon and leaving Modern Philosophy as an after thought tacked on as a closing paragraph. There's also problems with the recording at certain points throughout making it quite irritating to listen to at times.

If you want to learn more about Descartes than Bacon this is probably good as an introduction, but don't expect much else.

1 person found this helpful

Excellent Book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-06-11

An excellent book, very listenable, packed with the kinds of scientific details and statistical observations that make Harris so popular. I'm not (as yet) sure whether I agree with Harris' central thesis, there's some complex ideas in the book that request and require some detailed, analytical thinking that are not always the priority of a first hearing, but - gladly - it's short enough to allow for multiple readings without any major innconveniance.

9 people found this helpful

Sadly - no exception.

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-11

I've never been much for Adams' humour and this was - sadly - no exception. Treat it as sci-fi rather than sci-fi comedy and you can get a little out of it. But not much!

Though as a Whovian I was drawn to the references to the Dr Who episodes Shada and The City of Death so cunningly recycled into the narratives conclusion. But it was not enough to make it worth my while.