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Gus Honeybun

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The third best way to experience Jeeves & Wooster

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-06-19

Saying that this is the third best way to experience the books may sound like a back-handed compliment, but when you consider that number one is to listen to the Jonathan Cecil unabridged audiobooks, and number two is to read the books proper, it's actually high praise indeed.

Performances are generally excellent. Briers occasionally overacts, but is usually very good, and the Madeline Basset isn't quite right, but that aside these are studied performances.

The scripts really are wonderful, they are incredibly faithful to the source material. It's as fine an adaptation as you can possibly imagine. This is where the TV adaptation starring Stephen Fry and Hugh Laurie fell down, with some poor quality and unfaithful adaptations which failed to capture the spirit of the original. In my opinion, it wasted the two brilliant stars and an amazing opportunity to commit the series to film.

The only real issue with this set is that the books are in the wrong order, which feels like a bit of a 'you had one job' problem. If you're going to the trouble of issuing this set, surely it'd only take minutes to make sure they're in the right order.

16 people found this helpful

Needless to say, I had the last laugh.

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-01-19

This is a pretty strange book, largely stemming from the fact that Pat Mills comes across as quite strange. He expresses a keen interest in implausible conspiracy theories and the paranormal, and it feels as though he uses a large portion of the book to get back at people that he considers have wronged him. In fact, there is a strong Partridgian undercurrent running throughout. Don't expect much in the way of modesty or self-awareness.

With that said though, this is an interesting insight into the world of British comics. Pat has created and helped to develop some legendary comic characters, and certainly has some interesting views and anecdotes. I think it's wise to take adversarial accounts like this with a pinch of salt, whoever writes them, but I was suitably entertained. If you're a 2000AD fan, then you should definitely buy this, you won't be bored by it.

A distinctly better than average audio book

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-10-18

Romesh takes us - via the medium of shouting in a dull monotone, which is possible, apparently - through a quick tour of his life and career accomplishments. There are some great anecdotes, and the details of his life are unusual and interesting. Basically, if you like Romesh, and you should, you'll like this. My only real gripe is that the book ends incredibly suddenly, pretty much mid-anecdote. But it's a good listen which gives you a bit more insight into the kind of person that he is than you might have gained from his shows and TV appearances. #deadpancomic

4 people found this helpful

Interesting, with terrible narration

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-09-17

How did the narrator detract from the book?

The narration in this volume is often awful. Several of the narrators are people who it would be difficult to listen to in normal conversation, and yet apparently they are prolific narrators of audio books. One woman in particular drives me up the wall. She attempts to speak with personality and passion, but she reads everything with a horrible smirk (and invariably trailing syllables at the end of each sentence) that makes everyone she reads for sound obnoxious or foolish.Pronunciations are also laughably bad (Voyager's first officer is apparently someone called 'Shah...COTAY' and their principal enemies in season one were the Kah Zon). Pronunciation is very bad throughout. It's bad enough that I considered just giving up.

Not bad, but a bit lazy

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-11-16

Would you recommend this book to a friend? Why or why not?

This is a reasonable audiobook, but marred somewhat by the fact that the good bits have been recycled from live shows and TV appearances. As such, there's a good chance you may have heard some of it before. It's also quite short, and some of it seems to have been written purely to bulk out the word count.

Had I paid the eye-watering RRP of £21.87, I would be so furious that I would emit a brown, viscous fluid from my eyes, ears and pits whilst screaming and beating my bare chest. Thankfully I used an Audible credit instead, so that's not too bad and I feel I just about got my money's worth.

If you have a spare credit about to expire, and don't know what to do with it, then buy this book.

5 people found this helpful

An exercise in tedium

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 30-12-13

What disappointed you about A Brief History of Roman Britain?

An appallingly dry and boring book. It is a simple listing of facts with absolutely nothing whatsoever to hold your attention. I literally couldn't believe that a) someone had written something so utterly devoid of interest and b) someone chose to publish it.

What did you like about the performance? What did you dislike?

The reading was fine, but she might as well have been reading the phone book.

12 people found this helpful