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  • Into the Silence

  • By: Wade Davis
  • Narrated by: Enn Reitel
  • Length: 28 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 155
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 146
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 148

A monumental work of history, biography and adventure – the First World War, Mallory and Mount Everest – ten years in the writing.If the quest for Mount Everest began as a grand imperial gesture, as redemption for an empire of explorers that had lost the race to the Poles, it ended as a mission of regeneration for a country and a people bled white by war.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Epic prize winner

  • By M. Griffiths on 22-11-14

excellent account

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-07-18

interesting account of the early Everest expeditions. putting the mountaineers ambition into the context of their WWI experience

  • Empire of Things

  • How We Became a World of Consumers, from the Fifteenth Century to the Twenty-First
  • By: Frank Trentmann
  • Narrated by: Mark Meadows
  • Length: 33 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 112
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 99
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 96

What we consume has become the defining feature of our lives: our economies live or die by spending, we are treated more as consumers than workers and even public services are presented to us as products in a supermarket. In this monumental study, acclaimed historian Frank Trentmann unfolds the extraordinary history that has shaped our material world, from late Ming China, Renaissance Italy and the British Empire to the present.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Reflections on what we own and how it owns us.

  • By Wras on 07-03-16

alternative view

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-06-18

well argued view of economic history from the perspective of consumption and the consumer not production. questions some accepted norms