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Mr Chops

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  • 310
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  • 550
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Good but not quite

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-05-20

Atmospheric tale, superb voice acting, interesting characters, plot and locations. A couple of reviewers complained about the ending - I disagree, the reader discovers whodunnit, how and why so not sure what they were referring to. My only criticism is that I find the ouse of literary devices to build tension by having characters avoid asking the obvious question that most people would eventually ask, very annoying. The plot didn’t move fast enough for me and I skipped chapters. I will try another by Lucy Atkins and definitely by Susie Riddell

Parental love, nature and painting

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-04-20

Others describe this as a village and as one of my favourites Under Milk Wood. It was enjoyable but it isn't as broad, lyrical or humorous as Under Milk Wood. In essence it is a mothers love for her creative, misunderstood, child, his love of painting and nature, with a Puck type spirit observing and occasionally influencing things.

It seemed his eyes were smiling at her...

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-03-20

This is well narrated and has some nice descriptive pieces, but overall it was a bit too Mills and Boon for me. The good guys continually, knowingly, smile and mock the heroine with their eyes. She in her turn repeatedly compared herself unfavourable to men. It's not exactly a feminist work. Neither is it a classic, unraveling deep truths and mysteries of human relations.
It is a nice enough pass time, if you can ignore or even enjoy the silly romance on which it is centred.

Great characters brilliantly given life by S Dastor

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-20

I am a huge fan of this series. It is atmospheric, light hearted but at the same time introducing real aspects of India both political and cultural that are new to me. The main characters are slightly eccentric and likeable without the annoying soppy aspect of some similar authors characters. Sam Dastor is a very talented narrator and renders each one distinctly greatly enhancing the audio version. I thought perhaps the 'plot' for this one was not quite as good as some of the previous three, but it is still a solid five stars for me. Tarquin Hall is the only author who consistently delivers with each book.

1 person found this helpful

load of old cobblers

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-01-20

A very confused story, written by someone who seems to know about paperwork but little else. If you are prepared to believe that an international airport would have an entire level, unsecured, empty yet accessible to the public from the main lifts, protected only by having the floor button not light up. Then you are probably ok with all the subsequent nonsense, assuming you can maintain attention through all of the mostly irrelevant details of protocol and procedure. The characters are about as convincing and realistic as inspector Clueso and Danger Mouse.

1 person found this helpful

Complex for complexities sake

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-01-20

An interesting start but so many improbable twists and turns that are blatantly just deliberate plot reversals to maintain interest that they have the opposite effect. It is hard to believe in and get lost in the story.

Two parts history, one part fantasy

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 20-12-19

If you are happy with King Arthur, Lancelot and the Holy grail coming to Glastonbury as history then this is the book for you. Personally I prefer historians who rely on evidence and present them as a narrative sequence or story. There is no narrative here just a series of places and associated legends, folk lore, myths and some facts. Legends have their place, but I wouldn't call them history. I found Andrew Marr and Simon Schama's books much more rewarding as I felt I had learnt something. I haven't finished the book yet, but if the pixies of Northumberland and Dragons of Wales make an appearance alongside the Celts and Vikings I will not be too surprised.

Gorgeous narration, somewhat, unattractive cast

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-12-19

I would probably enjoy Juliet Stevenson reading the O.E.D. She is perfectly matched for this book. The characters are interestingly insular. I don't have children so can only speak from the outside. The impact on the twins seems to barely to feature in the thinking and decisions of these people. Perhaps that is what I would be like as a parent but I really hope not!

trying make the facts fit the theory

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-19

This book feels like the author wanted to write a book and then set about coming up with examples that fit his theory without delving into any of them too deeply. There is very little time spent on the many plausible alternative hypotheses for why people behaved the way they did in each instance.

Too sickly

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-12-19

The characters are all too perfect to be interesting and are actually a bit sickly

1 person found this helpful