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Sally

  • 12
  • reviews
  • 26
  • helpful votes
  • 75
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A truly involving character

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-08-17

Yet another adventure in the life of John Milton. I am enjoying every episode in the life of this character, either on Kindle or on MP3. On MP3 the narrative is excellent. The assassin-turned-nice-guy is a cliche but great escapism.

Could not get to grips with this

Overall
2 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 05-05-16

Maybe because this is book two of the series, but I really didn't care about the characters. I bought this becuase I have listened to other Peter May books and had grown to like him, but I won't be buying any more of this series.

3 people found this helpful

One man more for the slaughter

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-01-16

This is a great story and well read. Calling it a science fiction horror story misses the point. It is more a myth of legend, harking back to the heroes and and sacrifices to the gods of ancient times. I love the horror genre as it often reflects us in our darkest hour, echoing the question, what would YOU do? This story is inventive, novel and moral. Read it and you'll see what I mean.

1 person found this helpful

Friendship, Betrayal and Trust

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-11-15

Do we really know our friends? What do we base our trust on? This book explores those two questions and comes up with some surprising answers. The plot is at times exciting and the relationships thought-provoking.

Stick with this; it'll be worth it

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-11-15

When I first started this book, I thought, "Alien lands on Earth and points out all our foibles, variations on a common theme", but I carried on listening and started to root for the main character. This is pleasant read with small comedic twists.

A little cliched

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 31-05-15

After reading "The Wating Room", one of the creepiest tales I have ever listened to, I was quite eager read more by this author. I t was an enjoyable read, but the first part of the book was full of Hammer House cliches. I felt that the characters in Brodmaw Bay and the plot were not as intricately drawn as I had expected, so I was a little diappointed. However, this was an interesting distraction, just not creepy enough for me.

1 person found this helpful

Unputdownable!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-01-15

At first glance the premise of this book seems very paranormal and threatens to stretch our suspension of disbelief a little too far, but the characters are three dimensional and the plot thickens into a situation which is unfortunately all too real. A dying boy, who believes himself to be the reincarnation of a serial killer and seeks absolution sets off a gripping chain of events with its roots in a past tragedy. It is mystery, action thriller and personal tragedy all rolled neatly into one well-defined package.

I am a bad sleeper with a busy brain and up to now Audible has been so handy. I switch my MP3 player into sleep mode and drift off to a story, even something action-packed or mystery-filled. I don't recommend "The Child" for this type of listening. It is so well written and acted and the plot so interesting, it was impossible to stop listening. When my player switched itself off, I would think, 'just another 10 minutes' and put it back on again!

A hotel possessed - the real story of the Overlook

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-09-13

If you have seen either of the films or the TV series of this title, you may think this book holds no further surprises. You would be wrong. The director's cut is the story of a family's fight for survival against pure evil in an isolated, snow-bound hotel. On a more human level, it is the story of how families survive.

Danny, the five year old son of Jack and Wendy, sees visions. He can find things that are lost and can read his parents thoughts. When Jack takes a winter caretaker's job at the isolated Overlook Hotel, high in the mountains, Danny's "shining" awakens an evil that hunts him. What follows is a terrifying escalation of horror and suspense. Forget the films; the pictures in your own head are far more vivid and horrifying !

From a human perspective, Jack is a recovering alcoholic, whose addiction has brought his family to the brink. This job is his last chance to keep his family together, but the spirits in the hotel tempt him and taunt him to bring his son to them. In this, only his third published book, Stephen King' s own battle with alcohol adds an interesting backdrop. Addiction fills you with demons. The reason that King's narrative works so well is that normal human reactions and emotions lie at its base.

6 people found this helpful

A third treat from the Isle of Lewis

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-05-13

I have been bowled over by these novels and couldn't wait to read each one in turn. Each plot links the past, childhood loves and teenage jealousies and loss, with a present conundrum. The characters are rich and their relationships are deep and realistically drawn. I suspected that the backdrop of a small Scottish isle might render the stories mundane, but far from it. Concentrating on a tiny community allows us to examine the protagonists and their motives in detail.

The narration is excellent, switching effortlessly between various Scottish brogues and English accents. The tale is told with meaning and expression.

I recommend this book and this author, though I would suggest reading the thee books, the Lewis Man, The Black House and The Chess Men, in order to understand the full history of the characters.

12 people found this helpful

Interesting story, irritating narration

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-02-13

The Graft presents the reader/listener with an interesting study of the criminal underground. The characters and their relationships have depth and our understanding of them develops though the novel. Stories of individuals seemingly leading disparate lives are drawn together by invisible threads to lead to a final denouement. Some fascinating but uncomfortable realities come to light. Unfortunately my listening was spoilt by the narrator, who seemed to use the same intonation for every utterance. The dialogue was voiced quite convincingly but the rest of the narration was irritating, subtle nuances being masked by a reading without meaning. It is a testament to the author's skill that I decided to stick with it and I'm glad that I did. However, I won't be buying another book narrated by Annie Aldington.