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Ms Lixie

London, United Kingdom
  • 22
  • reviews
  • 106
  • helpful votes
  • 27
  • ratings
  • The Dancer at the Gai-Moulin

  • Inspector Maigret; Book 10
  • By: Georges Simenon, Frank Wynne Translator
  • Narrated by: Gareth Armstrong
  • Length: 3 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 20
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 18

In the tenth installment to the Inspector Maigret series, the city of Simenon's youth comes to life in this new translation of this disturbing tale set in Liège. Maigret observes from a distance as two boys are accused of killing a rich foreigner in Liège. Their loyalty, which binds them together through their adventures, is put to the test, and seemingly irrelevant social differences threaten their friendship and their freedom.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Belgian adventure

  • By Ms Lixie on 28-01-15

A Belgian adventure

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-01-15

I don't want to spoil the book so suffice to say that Maigret is both a minor part and a major character in this book. I adore this series and the reader is brilliant. Several twists that had me wondering who was telling the truth. One of my favourites in this series.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Moriarty

  • By: Anthony Horowitz
  • Narrated by: Julian Rhind-Tutt, Derek Jacobi
  • Length: 10 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,161
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,088
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 1,090

Sherlock Holmes is dead. Days after Holmes and his arch-enemy Moriarty fall to their doom at the Reichenbach Falls, Pinkerton agent Frederick Chase arrives in Europe from New York. The death of Moriarty has created a poisonous vacuum which has been swiftly filled by a fiendish new criminal mastermind who has risen to take his place.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Completely taken in

  • By Joanna on 11-03-15

Nothing like House of Silk - Brilliant

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-14

I was put off this because of not enjoying the House of Silk, but I am so glad I read the other reviews and gave it a chance. Brilliant! Julian Rhind-Tutt reads it very well. Nothing about the story grates with the Conan Doyle stories. And as for the plot of this one - impossible to go into without spoiling it. You'll have to take it on trust that you'll be amazed.

  • Foxglove Summer

  • Rivers of London, Book 5
  • By: Ben Aaronovitch
  • Narrated by: Kobna Holdbrook-Smith
  • Length: 10 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,102
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 3,838
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,823

In the fifth of his best-selling series Ben Aaronovitch takes Peter Grant out of whatever comfort zone he might have found and takes him out of London - to a small village in Herefordshire where the local police are reluctant to admit that there might be a supernatural element to the disappearance of some local children. But while you can take the London copper out of London you can't take the London out of the copper. Travelling west with Beverley Brook, Peter soon finds himself caught up in a deep mystery and having to tackle local cops and local gods. And what's more all the shops are closed by 4pm....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • You can take a city wizard to the country but...

  • By Sarah on 17-11-14

Another Excellent Story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 18-11-14

I am a huge fan of this series. It is so imaginative and combines magic and mythical creatures into the London based stories without getting all leather and silver about it. This is the fifth book and is the first one to take our hero out of London, although not too far and with familiar faces referenced and involved at various points. Two young girls are missing and Peter sets off to decide if it is a Falcon case or not.

Most missing children stories have an obvious point point at which the story concludes but, without wishing to include any spoilers, Ben Aaronovitch doesn't go in for obvious. In fact I'm still reeling from the ending of the previous book, the implications of which are picked up during this one.

My only doubt is whether this would work as a stand-alone read/listen or whether you need to have started at the beginning. However, thinking back I feel there was enough background explanation to make it work - but not so much that it would feel to someone who had read them all like they were impatient for Peter to get on with it. And that speaks to the Author's skill at storytelling as well.

8 of 9 people found this review helpful

  • The Late Monsieur Gallet

  • Inspector Maigret, Book 3
  • By: Georges Simenon, Anthea Bell (translator)
  • Narrated by: Gareth Armstrong
  • Length: 4 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 91
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 74
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 72

George Simenon's devastating tale of misfortune, betrayal and the weakness of family ties, translated by Anthea Bell. Instead of the detail filling itself in and becoming clearer, it seemed to escape him. The face of the man in the ill-fitting coat just misted up so that it hardly looked human. In theory this mental portrait was good enough, but now it was replaced by fleeting images which should have added up to one and the same man but which refused to get themselves into focus.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • One of the best Maigret booksl

  • By D on 03-05-14

An Excellent Listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 28-07-14

I don't think there was anything I didn't like about this audiobook. The reading was excellent, the characters well brought out and the story engaging. Perhaps you can guess the solution before the end but it is still enjoyable to listen to because of Maigret's quiet outrage whenever someone behaves as they do in this story. I also loved the first book in this series and have just downloaded the third.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Pietr the Latvian

  • Inspector Maigret, Book 1
  • By: Georges Simenon, David Bellos (translator)
  • Narrated by: Gareth Armstrong
  • Length: 3 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 173
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 156
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 153

The first audiobook which appeared in Georges Simenon's famous Maigret series, in a gripping new translation by David Bellos.Inevitably Maigret was a hostile presence in the Majestic. He constituted a kind of foreign body that the hotel's atmosphere could not assimilate. Not that he looked like a cartoon policeman. He didn't have a moustache and he didn't wear heavy boots. His clothes were well cut and made of fairly light worsted. He shaved every day and looked after his hands. But his frame was proletarian. He was a big, bony man.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Easy Reading of a classic cop

  • By Viv on 28-01-14

Loved the TV series, now loving the audio books

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-07-14

I was almost put off by other reviews saying these translations made Maigret less likable but I am glad I took a chance on what is a relatively short audio book in exchange for one of my precious credits. I have listened to this twice and really love the story and the narrator. He does a great job with accents, men's voices and women's. Maigret is a touch 'harder' than the TV series from the 80s but not so much that this couldn't be Michael Gambon still. The story is interesting and has Maigret travelling around, talking to different ranks and interacting with Madame Maigret. I would definitely recommend this.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • And Then You Dye

  • A Needlecraft Mystery, Book 16
  • By: Monica Ferris
  • Narrated by: Susan Boyce
  • Length: 7 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 4
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4

At Crewel World - the needlework shop in Excelsior, Minnesota, run by Betsy Devonshire - an array of beautifully hand-dyed yarns are supplied by Hailey Brent, an avid hand-dyer as well as a customer. But shortly after her most recent delivery of yarn, Hailey is found dead in her home, with a gunshot wound to the head. Betsy can't imagine who might have killed Hailey, but she is determined to find out.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Very obvious plot

  • By Ms Lixie on 14-06-14

Very obvious plot

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
2 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-06-14

At one point in the story someone mentions that it doesn't usually take months for the shop owner to solve the mystery. "Months?" I thought. "How can this have taken more than a day or two?". The culprit really is obvious from about 1/3 of the way through despite the very obvious red herrings plonked down all over the place. The amercian narrator is r.e.a.d.i.n.g .v.e.r.y. c.a.r.e.f.u.l.l.y to make sure everything can be heard but as a result sounds like she's recording an audio book for children. I chose this because I found the previous books entertaining and needed something to listen to as I was packing to leave the house but I wouldn't get another with this narrator.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Fear in the Sunlight: Josephine Tey Series, Book 4

  • By: Nicola Upson
  • Narrated by: Sandra Duncan
  • Length: 12 hrs and 29 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 61
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 48
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 48

Summer, 1936: Writer Josephine Tey joins her friends in Portmeirion, meeting with Alfred Hitchcock to sign a film deal. Hitchcock has a few tricks planned to keep the party entertained, but things get out of hand when a Hollywood actress is brutally murdered. As fear and suspicion take over, Chief Inspector Archie Penrose becomes unsatisfied with the investigation. Several years later another horrific murder drives Penrose back to Portmeirion to uncover the shocking truth.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • So confusing, unlike the previous three

  • By Ms Lixie on 14-06-14

So confusing, unlike the previous three

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 14-06-14

The way the story is set out does not work at all in an audio format. The first time they time jumped with no warning I assumed I'd accidentally fast forwarded to another chapter and spent ages trying to work out where I should be in the recording. The random jumps were very confusing and with the ending being what it was I felt the whole thing was amazingly anticlimactic. Because of this, having heard the murderer's confession I didn't realise it was actually real until the book had almost finished. It's a shame as the basis of the story is as good as the other books.

3 of 3 people found this review helpful

Stop Press
    An Inspector Appleby novel
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Michael Innes
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Matt Addis
    
    


    
    Length: 17 hrs and 37 mins
    26 ratings
    Overall 3.8
  • Stop Press

  • An Inspector Appleby novel
  • By: Michael Innes
  • Narrated by: Matt Addis
  • Length: 17 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 26
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 23
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 23

Famous writer, Richard Eliot, has written numerous detective novels, featuring 'The Spider', a daring, clever criminal in earlier books, and an equally canny private investigator in later ones. But when he comes to life - first to burgle an odd neighbour, then to harass the Eliot family, and finally to attend his own 'birthday party' - Inspector John Appleby is sent to investigate.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Classic Mystery, Well Read

  • By Ms Lixie on 24-02-14

Classic Mystery, Well Read

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-02-14

Anyone who has read an Appleby mystery before knows what to expect - classic english country house type setting with clear distinctions between those upstairs and those downstairs. This is a classic one of those with, indeed, a house party in the house of a famous author who is possibly being wound up or possibly being driven towards a breakdown by a series of jokes and more sinister events. Appleby here is early on in his career and it is his sister who gets him involved just as the author's son is getting his university tutor and a psychologist entangled at the same time. The story, possibly because of the sheer length of this recording, loses it a bit towards the end and I had to go back and relisten to work out exactly what had happened. I find these mysteries seem to climax rather quickly compared to the length of the build up. Apart from that this is really good.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • Lestrade and the Sign of Nine

  • By: M J Trow
  • Narrated by: M J Trow
  • Length: 6 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 17
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 12
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 12

It is a puzzle that has faced Scotland Yard from the beginning - whose was the limbless body found among the foundations? And in the murderous world of Sholto Lestrade, one question is invariably followed by another - what do a lecherous rector, a devious speculator and a plagiarist novelist all have in common? Answer: they're all dead - each of them with a bloody space where his head used to be. And six others are to join them before our intrepid inspector brings the perpetrator to book.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Classic Detective Plus Funny

  • By Ms Lixie on 24-02-14

Classic Detective Plus Funny

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-02-14

I have read a few of this series and while they were all good this was the funniest. There are so many comic moments and puns slipped into the text that even on a second or third listen you'll find new things to smile or laugh at. The actual story sees Lestrade start out by shooting himself in the leg and then, as usual, he and those around him pick up a series of other injuries throughout the book. There are lots of murders, lots of excellent accents and a fair few twists. The narrator is also the author and unlike some memorable others this isn't out of vanity. He genuinely reads the stories very well.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

Appleby and Honeybath
    
    
        By:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Michael Innes
    
    


    
    
        Narrated by:
        












    





    





    
        
            
            
                
            
        
        Jeremy Clyde
    
    


    
    Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
    7 ratings
    Overall 4.3
  • Appleby and Honeybath

  • By: Michael Innes
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Clyde
  • Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 6
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7

Every English mansion has a locked room, and Grinton Hall is no exception. The library has hidden doors and passages - and a corpse. But when the corpse goes missing, Sir John Appleby and Charles Honeybath have an even more perplexing case on their hands. Just how did it disappear when the doors and windows were securely locked? A bevy of helpful houseguests offer endless assistance, but the two detectives suspect that they are concealing vital information.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A good classic detective mystery

  • By Ms Lixie on 29-01-14

A good classic detective mystery

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-01-14

Would you recommend this audiobook to a friend? If so, why?

This is a lovely mystery set in an english country house during a house party. It combines this already classic murder setting with a body in the library, which vanishes before the police arrive. The retired detective, the actual police, Honeybath the artist and all the personalities of the house guests could lead to one big confusing mess but they don't. I'd definitely recommend it to someone who liked classic english mysteries.

Which scene did you most enjoy?

Near the beginning you have people's reaction to Honeybath's tale of discovering a body, followed by the body vanishing and the various reactions to it. This was written very well.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

It is a bit long for that, but in between bouts of listening I did think about the story and wonder what was coming next.

Any additional comments?

I would recommend this to anyone who likes classic british mysteries.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful