LISTENER

Carol

Brighton, United Kingdom
  • 3
  • reviews
  • 17
  • helpful votes
  • 3
  • ratings
  • The Power of Now

  • By: Eckhart Tolle
  • Narrated by: Eckhart Tolle
  • Length: 7 hrs and 37 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,214
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,362
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,302

To make the journey into The Power of Now you need to leave your analytical mind and its false created self, the ego, behind. Access to the Now is everywhere - in the body, the silence, and the space all around you. These are the keys to enter a state of inner peace.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I was sceptical

  • By Mr. Jm Bird on 25-05-11

Can't believe I fell for this tripe

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-01-19

I'd never heard of Eckhart Tolle and downloaded this book on the recommendation of a friend. I was sceptical of someone calling himself a 'spiritual teacher' but willing to be open minded. After listening to maybe 3 hours of this magnum opus my scepticism was proved correct. There is a nugget of wisdom in this book which is essentially no different to the practice of mindfulness - the only moment we have is now so be aware, be present. Er, that's it. I bailed halfway through chapter 3 when I couldn't stand him droning on about the same point in different ways. There is a lot of repetition and a lot of rubbish wrapped up as 'spiritual' guidance. I read afterwards he is a multi-millionaire on the back of this and other books so I suspect he lives in 'clock time', as he disdainfully calls it, a lot more than he advocates other people do. You would be better spending the 7 plus hours required to listen to this doing some mindfulness practice instead.

5 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Fifth Queen

  • And How She Came to Court
  • By: Ford Madox Ford
  • Narrated by: Ralph Cosham
  • Length: 18 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 5
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1
  • Story
    0 out of 5 stars 0

The Fifth Queen is Ford Maddox Ford’s masterful trilogy of historical fiction centered on Katharine Howard, a young girl of a proud, noble, and impoverished family who catches the jaded eye of Henry VIII and becomes his controversial fifth Queen.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Not an easy listen

  • By Carol on 24-08-12

Not an easy listen

Overall
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 24-08-12

I downloaded this as I've really enjoyed recent books on the reign of Henry VIII, most notably Hilary Mantel's books. I gave up on it after a few chapters. I found the writing style very clunky with too much 'telling not showing' about the characters. Ford Madox Ford really likes his adverbs! I might have persevered in written form but Ralph Cosham's narration finished it off for me in this audio book. He reads too fast and has a 'rat a tat' style of delivery that gets wearing very quickly.

8 of 8 people found this review helpful

  • Charles Dickens

  • A Life
  • By: Claire Tomalin
  • Narrated by: Alex Jennings
  • Length: 16 hrs and 30 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 408
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 266
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 266

The unabridged, downloadable audiobook edition of Charles Dickens: A Life, the major new biography from the highly acclaimed Claire Tomalin, published for the 200th anniversary of his birth. Read by the actor Alex Jennings.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • As lively a story as a good novel

  • By Kirstine on 27-01-12

Needed a tougher editor

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-06-12

I bought this as an audio book as I was fascinated to read about Dickens but didn't want to carry around the large hardback edition. It is a very comprehensive account of the life and works of a brilliant, complex and flawed man. Like many readers/listeners, I found that the more I knew about Dickens the less I liked him. My main criticism is that there is just too much detail. At times it felt more like an account of diary extracts than a biography, especially in the last couple of chapters. There is a mind numbing number of references to guest lists, menus and travel arrangements. A tougher editor could have cut the length by at least a third. Also, Tomalin is happy to give us her analysis of his novels but I never really felt I got her analysis of Dickens the man.

I liked Alex Jennings' narration although wasn't sure about his choice of a rather fey voice for Dickens himself. But it is a much more enjoyable listen than the Radio 4 Book of the Week version with Penelope Wilton, which was too syrupy and deferential in tone.As Tomalin makes clear, Dickens is one of the greatest English novelists, but was far from a 'national treasure' in other aspects of his life.

4 of 4 people found this review helpful