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NH Stevens

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  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 13
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  • The Invention of Nature

  • The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt, the Lost Hero of Science
  • By: Andrea Wulf
  • Narrated by: David Drummond
  • Length: 14 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 176
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 159
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 158

Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859) is the great lost scientist: more things are named after him than anyone else. There are towns, rivers, mountain ranges, the ocean current that runs along the South American coast; there's a penguin, a giant squid - even the Mare Humboldtianum on the moon. His colourful adventures read like something out of a Boy's Own story.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wonderful book

  • By Andy on 05-01-17

Gripping from start to finish

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-01-19

Rarely has a book on an 18th century man of science, nature, art and natural history been more exciting and unputdownable than the story of this utterly uniquely passionate man whose “ invention” and love of Nature was decades before his time. You will not regret reading this magnificent story.

  • The Diary of a Bookseller

  • By: Shaun Bythell
  • Narrated by: Robin Laing
  • Length: 9 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 863
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 783
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 788

Shaun Bythell owns The Bookshop, Wigtown - Scotland's largest second-hand bookshop. In these wry and hilarious diaries, Shaun provides an inside look at the trials and tribulations of life in the book trade, from struggles with eccentric customers to wrangles with his own staff. He takes us with him on buying trips to old estates and auction houses, recommends books and evokes the rhythms and charms of small-town life, always with a sharp and sympathetic eye.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A gentle pleasure

  • By Flint on 11-12-17

An engaging and enlightening tale

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 16-10-18

Everyone thinks they would like to run a second-hand bookshop. After reading this delightfully-narrated book sean Bythell tells the story of his biting and runny a second-hand bookshop in Scotland in the bookish town of Wigtown.
You will realise that it dealing with the general public is much much harder than you ever imagined. Also probably even more interesting than you had imagined. The cast of town characters and bookshop staff will keep you engaged and charmed for hours. I shall miss them all now that the book is finished.

  • If Only They Didn't Speak English

  • Notes From Trump's America
  • By: Jon Sopel
  • Narrated by: Jon Sopel
  • Length: 9 hrs and 52 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 638
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 586
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 582

As the BBC's North America Editor, Jon Sopel has had a pretty busy time of it lately. In the 18 months it's taken for a reality star to go from laughingstock to leader of the free world, Jon has travelled the length and breadth of the United States, experiencing it from a perspective that most of us could only dream of: he has flown aboard Air Force One, interviewed President Obama and has even been described as 'a beauty' by none other than Donald Trump.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Brilliant, entertaining and superb

  • By Chris Thomas on 21-09-17

Brilliant encapsulation of America today, but with rapid-fire speed

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-07-18

Jon Sorel has written a compelling book recounting the truth about America today. His rapid-fire r acing takes a little getting used to, but stay with it. You’ll love the ride!

  • The Rooster Bar

  • By: John Grisham
  • Narrated by: Ari Fliakos
  • Length: 10 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 837
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 759
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 756

Law students Mark, Todd and Zola wanted to change the world - to make it a better place. But these days these three disillusioned friends spend a lot of time hanging out in The Rooster Bar, the place where Todd serves drinks. As third-year students, they realise they have been duped. They all borrowed heavily to attend a law school so mediocre that its graduates rarely pass the bar exam, let alone get good jobs.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Grisham Raises The Bar

  • By Simon on 20-10-17

Hard to know where this story was trying to go

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-04-18

Even though I enjoyed it, this story did seem to wander about, trying to cover too many story lines at once. I could I really figure out the point of it until about three-quarters of the way through. Finally, it does all make sense.

  • The Whistler

  • By: John Grisham
  • Narrated by: Cassandra Campbell
  • Length: 13 hrs and 9 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 723
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 650
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 652

The most corrupt judge in US history. A young investigator with a secret informant. The electrifying new thriller. Lacy Stoltz never expected to be in the firing line. Investigating judicial misconduct by Florida's 1,000 judges, her cases so far have been relatively unexciting. That's until she meets Greg Myers, an indicted lawyer with an assumed name who has an extraordinary tale to tell. Myers is representing a whistle-blower who knows of a judge involved in organised crime.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • This is

  • By M on 31-12-16

A cast of thousands and a complex plot

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-12-17

This interesting story has an enormous number of disparate characters, some clichéd, some original, but if you stick with it, it does begin to pull together.
Sometimes I felt that too many issues were being dealt with, but I am glad I stuck with it. Not one of Grisham’s best, but readable.

  • Tribute

  • By: Nora Roberts
  • Narrated by: Jennifer Van Dyck
  • Length: 14 hrs and 17 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 49
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 30

Finally out of the celebrity spotlight and away from her mother's demands, Cilla is free to do what she loves: fixing up houses for profit. Her current project is personal. The Shenandoah Valley farm house was once the vacation home of Hollywood luminary Janet Hardy, Cilla's grandmother. When Cilla uncovers a stash of her grandmother's private letters, and begins asking questions about the past, she becomes the target of a crazed killer.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Fine if you like building houses

  • By Tina Kemp on 13-10-17

Everyone is slightly too good to be true

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-14

If you could sum up Tribute in three words, what would they be?

Over-written, over-long, predictable

What was your reaction to the ending? (No spoilers please!)

Not sure I'm going to get there.......And I have greatly enjoyed two other books by this author

What does Jennifer Van Dyck bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you had only read the book?

Her ability to mimic gentle Southern accents is unprecedented - and she can give specific characteristics to each person in the story.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Too repetitious for that.

Any additional comments?

This is the third Nora Roberts I've read and will probably be the last, as her female characters are all beginning to seem the same: dominating, courageous, independent; and her men are all just too good to be true. Her characters needs some human flaws!!

  • The Life & Times of the Thunderbolt Kid

  • By: Bill Bryson
  • Narrated by: Bill Bryson
  • Length: 7 hrs and 27 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 764
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 507
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 506

Bill Bryson's hilarious memoir of growing up in middle America in the Fifties, complete, unabridged and read by the author. Born in 1951 in the middle of the United States, Des Moines, Iowa, Bill Bryson is perfectly positioned to mine his memories of a totally all-American childhood for 24 carat memoir gold.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Stupid grin on my face

  • By chris on 26-10-06

Laughing through the 1950's

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-07-14

Where does The Life & Times of the Thunderbolt Kid rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

This book, perhaps especially for Americans like myself, is a priceless review of the glory days of America in the 1950's, a time of unprecedented prosperity, movement and a consumerism which took hold and never let go. Bill Bryson's account of growing up in these delicious times is funny, poignant and an unbeatable record of a life experience which can never repeated. A hilarious and informative read. One of the best.

What did you like best about this story?

Bill Bryson's sense of mischievous naughtiness, with ever a twinkle in his voice, as he describes a small boy growing up in a typical American household of the thriving Fifties.

Which character – as performed by Bill Bryson – was your favourite?

Bill Bryson reads his own material, which gives it a specific tenor and element of humour, as he clearly enjoying re-living his glorious 1950's childhood and remembering his friends and parents and their friends.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Most definitely!

Any additional comments?

Bill Bryson is very much a writer for the ordinary person - nothing intellectual, just sharply -observed comments on everyday life, but always historically accurate and always information. He has a knack for putting you right in there with him as he recounts his crazy adventures.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • One Summer

  • America 1927
  • By: Bill Bryson
  • Narrated by: Bill Bryson
  • Length: 17 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,395
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,274
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,271

One Summer: America, 1927, is the new book by Britain’s favourite writer of narrative nonfiction, Bill Bryson. Narrated by the man himself, One Summer takes you to the summer when America came of age, took centre stage, and changed the world forever. In the summer of 1927, America had a booming stock market, a president who worked just four hours a day, a semi-crazed sculptor with a plan to carve four giant heads into a mountain called Rushmore, a devastating flood of the Mississippi, a sensational murder trial, and a youthful aviator named Charles Lindbergh who started the summer wholly unknown, and finished it as the most famous man on Earth.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Bryson hits another Home Run

  • By Colin on 21-10-13

Unmissable, incredible, so readable

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-05-14

Bill Bryson started researching the famous baseball season of 1927, and whilst doing the research, began to realise that many many unique and fascinating events had taken place during that remarkable summer of 1927.

Like Bill Bryson, I got utterly pulled in by all the amazing, though totally unrelated, stories and events of that summer.

I cannot recommend this wonderful book too highly.

  • Our Man in Havana

  • By: Graham Greene
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Northam
  • Length: 7 hrs and 6 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 827
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 722
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 718

In a legendary novel that appears to predict the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962, Graham Greene introduces James Wormold, a vacuum cleaner salesman whose life in transformed when he is asked to join the British Secret Service. He agrees, and finds himself with no information to offer, so begins to invent sources and agencies which do not exist, but which appear very real to his superiors.

  • 3 out of 5 stars
  • Shame about the music

  • By DD Kaplan on 27-07-10

The music helps a lot

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-02-13

Am I the only person who loved the musical intervals which distinguished events in London and Havana? Maybe because I was brought up on Cuban music (growing up near Miami) I thought it

added mood and flavour to Jeremy Northam's brilliant reading of this hilarious satire. I'd love to know who composed the Cuban music.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful