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Barry

Coventry, United Kingdom
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  • 100
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  • 80
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  • Extinct

  • Extracted, Book 3
  • By: R. R. Haywood
  • Narrated by: Carl Prekopp
  • Length: 12 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,375
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,306
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,305

The end of the world has been avoided - for now. With Miri and her team of extracted heroes still on the run, Mother, the disgraced former head of the British Secret Service, has other ideas.... While Mother retreats to her bunker to plot her next move, Miri, Ben, Safa and Harry travel far into the future to ensure that they have prevented the apocalypse. But what they find just doesn't make sense. London in 2111 is on the brink of annihilation.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing sequel, read by phenomenally talented CP!!

  • By Lauren on 21-05-18

Irritating and purile

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 22-04-19

The first in the series had some good ideas and some discipline in the writing. The second was formulaic and and childish I just about made it through. Time passed and I got this one when it was on special offer to see if things improve. Alas after a couple of chapters of toilet humour, some very weak writing, and a narrator who may have been sending rescue notes about being trapped in a studio with the worst dialogue ever, I threw in the towel.
"Oh," says A.
"What," says B.
"Something," says C.
"Something else," says D.
"Oh," says A again.
"That," says B.
"What," says B again.
"Something truly idiotic," says C.
"Lets do something moronic because we have a time machine the septic tank is full," says D.
'You've got pooh on your face," says A.
"Oh I slay myself with my fearless wir," says the author.
"I wonder if I can disguise this strained dialogue with a Liverpool accent and by reading it really fast," says the narrator.
"Unless you are a particularly dumb nine year old boy, you are out of luck," says this reviewer.

  • The One

  • By: John Marrs
  • Narrated by: Clare Corbett, Vicky Hall, Simon Bubb, and others
  • Length: 11 hrs and 1 min
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,329
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,227
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,221

How far would you go to find The One? One simple mouth swab is all it takes. A quick DNA test to find your perfect partner - the one you're genetically made for. A decade after scientists discover everyone has a gene they share with just one other person, millions have taken the test, desperate to find true love. Now, five more people meet their Match. But even soul mates have secrets. And some are more shocking - and deadlier - than others....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • I absolutely loved this book!!

  • By Daisy on 02-06-17

Beware. May liquefy your brain.

Overall
1 out of 5 stars
Performance
1 out of 5 stars
Story
1 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 06-03-19

Got it on a daily deal because the premise looked interesting and it had good reviews. My guess is that it is aimed at people who have not read a lot other than horoscopes. Would need far better narrators to lift the awkward prose and clunky worldview. I got an hour in but the introduction to characters and their two dimensional soap opera world was painful. Maybe it gets better but there had been nothing in the writing or narration to indicate it had any redeeming features coming any way soon. It was not worth the risk of my brain liquefying if I continued. Sorry. Not for me.

  • Nicholas Nickleby

  • By: Charles Dickens
  • Narrated by: Alex Jennings
  • Length: 34 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 272
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 217
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 213

One of Dickens' early works, Nicholas Nickleby combines comedy and tragedy in a tale of triumph over adversity that is interspersed with Dickens' moving condemnation of society's mistreatment of children and the cruelty of the educational system. Young Nickleby struggles to seek his fortune in Victorian England, yet succeeds despite social injustice, in a story that mirrors Dickens' own rise from poverty to great success.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Old warhorse fighting fit

  • By Brian on 06-09-09

So good, words fail me - don't they though, Alex J

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 19-01-19

I had been given the impression that this was a dreary unpleasant book by others who had read it. Instead I found a humorous masterpiece that took over Christmas. The entire family listened whenever we sat down together. We finished with a gluttony of listening on a very long drive back home and agreed it had been something quite wonderful.

Newmann Noggs and John Browdie - friends and confidants to Nicholas - have personalities that burst from the pages as friends you wish you had yourself. Nicholas, while being full blooded and ready to stick up for what is right, is still not one of Dickens's idiot young men like David Copperfield or Pip, who seem to think with their elbows and what they mix their elbows up with. No indeed, while Nicholas veers into and out of trouble, it is hard to find fault with his behaviour when you consider the provocation.

The book has been criticized for lack of character development and there are certainly roles in the book who seem less character and more vessels of exposition - the Wititterlys for example. This should not distract from the cast of memorable and wonderful characters, many of whom deserve a book all to themselves.

Now to Mr Alex Jennings. I had been avoiding him because I think I had been mixing him up with somebody else. Then during the summer I got The Kraken Wakes and realised that he is amazing. Against of field of such major Dickens reading talent as Martin Jarvis, David Timson, Anton Lesser, Simon Vance, and Hugh Dickson, who have all drawn superlatives from me, Alex Jennings stands out as one of my favourite DIckens listening experiences to date. He masterts this book and delivers a masterful performance. His range of voices and the sheer spot on accuracy of characterisation made it nigh on impossible to stop listening. His Smike breaks your heart, his Ralph chills your blood, his Browdie makes you cheer, and his Newman Noggs makes you want to hug someone. Jennings single handedly represents and gives life to some of Dickens's most wonderful grotesques, including the odious Wackford Squeers and his vile family. I am considering going back to get second recordings of books I already have so that I can hear what he does with other Dickens books.have added his name to my "top readers" list and I already have a backlong of his narrations to listen to. Brilliant.

  • The Other Wife

  • By: Michael Robotham
  • Narrated by: Sean Barrett
  • Length: 10 hrs and 33 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 941
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 871
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 869

 

Childhood sweethearts William and Mary have been married for 60 years. William is a celebrated surgeon, Mary a devoted wife. Both have a strong sense of right and wrong. This is what their son, Joe O'Loughlin, has always believed. But when Joe is summoned to the hospital with news that his father has been brutally attacked, his world is turned upside down. Who is the strange woman crying at William's bedside, covered in his blood - a friend, a mistress, a fantasist or a killer? 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Really excellent

  • By mollyeyre on 16-06-18

Got to love Ruiz speaking truth to Joe!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-07-18

These O'Loughlin books can be harrowing and previous entries had me listening through my fingers while the skill of Robotham as a writer kept me going. This one is lighter than some of the others and does not suffer from it. THe plot is "out there" and initially seems to forget some events from earlier books, but stick with it - all is explained.

The exploration of motives, human frailty and strength, response and reaction to changing perspectives, and all encompassing compassion for even the monsters, makes these books shine in the genre. Please keep writing them Michael Robotham. Sean Barrett, keep reading them, your characterisation of Ruiz is one of my favourite things in all of Audible.

  • The Power

  • By: Naomi Alderman
  • Narrated by: Adjoa Andoh, Naomi Alderman, Thomas Judd, and others
  • Length: 12 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,302
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,055
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,053

'She throws her head back and pushes her chest forward and lets go a huge blast right into the centre of his body. The rivulets and streams of red scarring run across his chest and up around his throat. She'd put her hand on his heart and stopped him dead.' Suddenly - tomorrow or the day after - girls find that with a flick of their fingers, they can inflict agonizing pain and even death.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Visceral, Stirring and Inspirational

  • By Raine on 29-12-16

Not the messiah, a very naughty trope.

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 23-07-18

I am an hour from the end of this and I am thoroughly depressed. The idea is that women, if they had the opportunity, would subject men to the worst excesses of inhumane treatment that has been visited on women through history. Don't tell me that I don't get it, that it is really shining a light on how women are treated by reversing the roles, i got it and I still didn't like it. I found this "shoe on the other foot" not challenging but childish. It is not truthful or honest about actual gender roles. It assumes that all men, with one or two exceptions, are beasts and not actually human beings at all. It relies on an oversimplified view of the world and sexual politics. It is not the messiah, it is a kind of wish fulfilment revenge porn masquerading as a clever concept. Sorry, but the concept is threadbare and obvious.

Parts of it are well written and it is well executed for what it is. The gushing reviews about blown minds and suggesting it should be mandatory reading at school are worrisome.

Fortunately for reality many men are prepared to defend the lives and the rights of others. Thank goodness life for the majority is not a game of men against women. Men and women get on much better than this author and others would like to admit. I fundamentally reject the notion that you can define a person by their gender. Nelson Mandela said that racism is racism whether practised by a white person or a black person. I think you can also say that sexism, regardless of the gender or sexual orientation of the perpetrator, is sexism. No one has a right of revenge against a whole gender or race - to suggest so is sexist and racist.

5 of 7 people found this review helpful

  • Dark Matter

  • By: Michelle Paver
  • Narrated by: Jeremy Northam
  • Length: 6 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,793
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,366
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,361

January 1937. Jack Miller has just about run out of options. His shoes have worn through, he can't afford to heat his rented room in Tooting, and he longs to use his training as an specialist wireless operator instead of working in his dead-end job. When he is given the chance to join an arctic expedition, as communications expert, by a group of elite Oxbridge graduates, he brushes off his apprehensions and convinces himself to join them.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Top 5 Horror

  • By Joseph on 04-04-11

The cold clarity sticks in the mind

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-03-18

I am writing this review some months after reading the book. It is a book youvwill think about after reading. In retrospect the story is clear and tightly written. It has some imagery that will stay with you for a long time. I enjoyed the listen. I found it very immersive, which is what I like in an audio book.

I liked the construct of the book using diaries letters and other means to give you a sense of immediacy, You can see the end coming for a while but I think you are meant to. The bookend pieces work very well and the horror is subtle and so very well done, chilling you without grossing you out.

Themes of isolation, culture clash, brutality, and love, remain clear in my mind months after reading it. It is an unusual and satisfying book. Highly recommended.

  • The North Water

  • By: Ian McGuire
  • Narrated by: John Keating
  • Length: 9 hrs and 39 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 690
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 646
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 647

Behold the man: Stinking, drunk, brutal and bloodthirsty, Henry Drax is a harpooner on the Volunteer, a Yorkshire whaling ship bound for the hunting waters of the Arctic Circle. Also aboard is Patrick Sumner, an ex-army surgeon with a shattered reputation, no money, and no better option than to embark as ship's medic on this ill-fated voyage.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A glorious and disturbing assault on the senses

  • By Kaggy on 21-02-17

Well written but deeply unpleasant book.Be careful

Overall
3 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-03-18

From the graphic description of the rape of a young boy to the seemingly endless bodily fluids and brutality it portrays, this book is full of deeply unpleasant mental images. The narrator is very talented and does a great job of presenting the book as I think it was intended, an assault on the reader.

I pressed on to the end and now I sort of wish I could unread it, or at least parts of it. As I said, much of the unpleasantness comes from the power of the writing at describing deeply unpleasant things and the skill of the narrator at delivering it. The focus is unremittingly on the worst aspects of human nature. It highlights how the innocent, particularly children, suffer at the hands of self interested, pitiliess men. I respect the author for having the stomach and the stamina to tackle his subject matter.

It is hard to know how to review this book and be fair. It does what it sets out to do and as such the writer and narrator deserve congratulation; but as a personal recommondation I can't give it high stars. I have settled for giving it four for both story and perfornamce but an overall three because as good as it was technically, i did not like it. I can appreciate the need for books that expose the horror created by us as a species, but I don't have to like them. I am not sure this sort of thing is not a sort of violence and disgust porn.

If you liked the themes of isolation and the effect of these environments on groups of men, then you might like Michelle Paver's Dark Matterr which deals with an expidition into the Arctic in the early 1900's and has many of the same themes. I enjoyed it immensely which is why I took up this one. The setting and themes are fascinating in both books but be careful of North Water if you are at all squeamish. Parts of it make for particularly upsetting listening,

  • Ready Player One

  • By: Ernest Cline
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton
  • Length: 15 hrs and 40 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 20,479
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 19,300
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19,236

It's the year 2044, and the real world has become an ugly place.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • This Book Changed My Life 💙 New Hobbies Found 💜

  • By Amazon Customer on 05-04-18

Enjoyable nostalgia

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-09-17

I really rather enjoyed this. I was never a video game fan but the logic and passion of the characters draws you in. I also liked the stark warnings the book has in its first chapters about global misuse of energy and political power. As the book goes on the virtual reality versus physical presence theme is well thought out. I was reminded a bit of Tad WIlliams's Otherland books which deal with VR and games on a far grander scale. They would be a great read for anyone who liked this.

Will Wheaton must really have had fun with one or two of the eighties' references and overall he does a great job. He is well cast as the main character and since most of this book is in the first person it really works out very well indeed.

  • The Chessmen

  • By: Peter May
  • Narrated by: Peter Forbes
  • Length: 10 hrs and 20 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,304
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,989
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,978

Fin Macleod, now head of security on a privately owned Lewis estate, is charged with investigating a spate of illegal-game hunting taking place on the island. This mission reunites him with Whistler Macaskill - a local poacher, Fin's teenage intimate and possessor of a long-buried secret. But when this reunion takes a violent, sinister turn and Fin puts together the fractured pieces of the past, he realises that revealing the truth could destroy the future.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A Masterclass in Storytelling

  • By MISS E J BIRD on 19-02-13

Will haunt my imagination for years to come-magic!

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-06-17

I initially bought because it was on offer and it had kept coming up in searches for chess themed books. It is the last in the series and although self contained it has lots of spoilers for the previous two. I am glad I waited and listened to The Blackhouse and The Lewis Man before this.

Narration is spot on and the story telling is once again terrific. It is sad to finally say goodbye to some excellent characters and a setting that will haunt my imagination for years to come. For interest sake I can add that The Lewis Chessmen do play an important role in the story and as metaphors for many of the clever themes in this trilogy.

The tension and unique flavour of these books is held until the very end although this volume is full of revelations and links that will delight readers of the previous two novels.

This whole trilogy is extraordinarily evocative and this is a fitting denoument. My review is vague because I don’t want to give anything away – if you enjoy a good story, excellently narrated, get this series. If you have read the other two, what are you waiting for?

  • The Lewis Man

  • By: Peter May
  • Narrated by: Peter Forbes
  • Length: 10 hrs and 57 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,612
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 2,186
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,172

An unidentified corpse is recovered from a peat bog on the Isle of Lewis, Scotland. News of the discovery soon reaches Fin Macleod. However, since swapping his life in Edinburgh for a quiet existence on Lewis, such mysteries are no longer a concern for the former detective inspector. Or so he thought. The sequel to The Blackhouse, which was selected for the WH Smith Richard and Judy Bookclub, and the second book in the Lewis trilogy. 

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Atmospheric sequel to The Blackhouse

  • By Kirstine on 24-02-12

An immersive experience

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-06-17

Please listen to the Blackhouse before this one. Although this is a standalone story you will get so much more from it if you have met the characters already and know their secrets and motivations. Having absolutely loved the Blackhouse and the narration thereof I was initially worried that the change on narrator would be problematical. The narration turned out to be perfection. The characterisation and tempo are masterful. If I could give the narrator more than five stars, I would. I like to think the narrator thanked his lucky stars for the material and arrived to work every day with a smug grin ready to show off his skills.

I thought the literary device in The Blackhouse was brilliant and May does it again here. Another literary device and narration technique that is, if anything, even better than the Blackhouse. We get to see dementia up close and personal and we practically get an instruction book on how to treat someone with the disease. It is all clever and subtle as the magnificent story telling keeps you pressing your sleep timer for another half hour.

It is with a sense of confidence that I set off to listen to the third book in the series, The Chessmen. I find myself scanning May’s other titles wondering if he was always this good and why nobody told me about him. The Lewis man is full of empathy, cleverness, wit, descriptive prose that makes you feel you have been on Lewis, ingenious dialogue, such a well judged story that perfectly times the release of facts and insights, this is the kind of immersive experience for which I joined Audible.

0 of 1 people found this review helpful