LISTENER

Purplelotus

UK
  • 17
  • reviews
  • 1
  • helpful vote
  • 17
  • ratings
  • Swan Song

  • By: John Galsworthy
  • Narrated by: David Case
  • Length: 10 hrs and 31 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 9
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 8

The "man of property", Soames Forsyte, has mellowed with the passing of the years until, in his old age, he is a patient and benign figure, guarding with especial tenderness the welfare of his daughter, Fleur. But all his watchfulness and devotion are powerless to avert tragedy when Fleur revives her old love affair with Jon Forsyte on Jon's return to England with his American wife.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Fabulous

  • By Purplelotus on 07-02-19

Fabulous

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 07-02-19

Have so enjoyed this middle trilogy. The goings on of the next generation of Forsyths and the repercussions for Soames. The narrator adds to the joy with real brilliance.

  • The Forsyte Saga

  • By: John Galsworthy
  • Narrated by: Fred Williams
  • Length: 42 hrs and 35 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    3.5 out of 5 stars 66
  • Performance
    3 out of 5 stars 36
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 35

The three novels that make up The Forsyte Saga chronicle the ebbing social power of the commercial upper-middle class Forsyte family through three generations, beginning in Victorian London during the 1880s and ending in the early 1920s. Galsworthy's masterly narrative examines not only their fortunes but also the wider developments within society, particularly the changing position of women.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • not for me

  • By Angela on 04-07-10

The Fortunes of the Forsyth Family

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-01-19

These novels are so enthralling and the writing is brilliant. Galsworthy has such sympathy for his female characters and is so intuitive about their motives and feelings, their frustrations and resentments. He is pretty good on the men too. There are real comic moments along with tragedy.

The narrator may not be the best but this is such good value don't let it put you off as it certainly didn't spoil my enjoyment.

  • The Best of Our Spies

  • By: Alex Gerlis
  • Narrated by: Stephen Critchlow
  • Length: 16 hrs and 43 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 93
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 85
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 84

France, July 1944: In the Pas de Calais, Nathalie Mercier, a young British special operations executive secret agent working with the French Resistance, disappears. In London her husband, Owen Quinn, an officer with Royal Navy Intelligence, sets off on a perilous hunt through France in search of his wife. With the help of the Resistance, he finds Nathalie, but then the bitterness of war and its insatiable appetite for revenge catch up with them in a dramatic fashion.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Wow! What a book!

  • By Raven Mad on 07-07-16

The Best of our Spy Stories

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 11-11-18

This is a cracking read, a real page turner. Can't recommend it more highly. Maybe a little far fetched but if you want a gripping well written yarn this will do it!

  • The Singapore Grip

  • By: J. G. Farrell
  • Narrated by: Mike Grady
  • Length: 25 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 14

A classic novel by a Booker Prize-winning author. Singapore just before the Japanese invasion in the Second World War: the Blackett family's prosperous world of tennis parties, cocktails and deferential servants seems unchanging. But it is poised on the edge of the abyss. This is the eve of the fall of Singapore and, as we know, of much else besides.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Superb

  • By Purplelotus on 12-10-18

Superb

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 12-10-18

This novel tells the stories of the disparate families and individuals caught up in the final days of Singapore before the Japanese invasion. The good are represented by the idealistic Matthew appaulled by how his inheritance has been amassed which gives Farrell an opportunity to explore colonial exploitation. Also the Major, another colonial washed up in Singapore but with a kind heart. The bad by Walter Blackett determined to shore up his company's interest with the help of his cunning daughter Joan. The ugly by the moustached, incompetent army chiefs. As Singapore collapses around them the rats flee the sinking ship but comeuppances are not forthcoming as the innocents and those without influence and money are left to their fate. As usual they suffer as they have always done while the privileged flee to safety.

But this is not a doom laden listen. Farrell is witty and dry as we watch everyone scrabble around trying to make sense of the collapse of their worlds be they at the top or the bottom of the heap. There are laugh out loud moments but even such dramatic changes in their lives gives none but a few any real cause to reflect on the collapse except the ever introspective Matthew.

  • Death of a River Guide

  • By: Richard Flanagan
  • Narrated by: Humphrey Bower
  • Length: 11 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7

Widely regarded as a classic in Australian literature, Richard Flanagan's debut novel takes us on a swirling journey into Tasmania's past and our river guide's own violent ancestral secrets. Beneath a waterfall on the Franklin, Aljaz Cosini, river guide, lies drowning. Beset by visions at once horrible and fabulous, he relives not just his own life but that of his family and forebears.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Must Read

  • By Purplelotus on 15-09-18

Must Read

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-09-18

Richard Flanagan is such a good writer. Rarely do you get really good writing and a good story. The writing is superb and the story line draws you in and keeps you hooked. His insights into the human condition are truly brilliant. Does not disappoint!

  • The Narrow Road to the Deep North

  • By: Richard Flanagan
  • Narrated by: Richard Flanagan
  • Length: 15 hrs and 5 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 403
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 373
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 373

August, 1943. In the despair of a Japanese POW camp on the Thai-Burma death railway, Australian surgeon Dorrigo Evans is haunted by his love affair with his uncle's young wife two years earlier. Struggling to save the men under his command from starvation, from cholera, from beatings, he receives a letter that will change his life forever. This savagely beautiful novel is a story about the many forms of love and death, of war and truth, as one man comes of age, prospers, only to discover all that he has lost.

  • 1 out of 5 stars
  • Awful.

  • By Barbara on 17-10-14

Brilliant

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 02-09-18

This is a such a good book. The writing is excellent, the story, a hard but great read. The way Flanagan looks at the motivations of all the participants, the Korean guard, the Japanese commander of the camp and the prisoners is insightful. Not only their experiences in the camp but the aftermath and how they rationalise their experiences.

Best novel I have read in years.

  • The Lost

  • A Search for Six of Six Million
  • By: Daniel Mendelsohn
  • Narrated by: Bronson Pinchot
  • Length: 22 hrs and 19 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 8
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 8

The Lost begins as the story of a boy who grew up in a family haunted by the disappearance of six relatives during the Holocaust - an unmentionable subject that gripped his imagination from earliest childhood. Decades later, spurred by the discovery of a cache of desperate letters written to his grandfather in 1939 and tantalized by fragmentary tales of a terrible betrayal, Daniel Mendelsohn sets out to find the remaining eyewitnesses to his relatives' fates.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • An amazing story and education

  • By Jackie on 19-09-16

Search for the truth

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 08-04-18

This is an engrossing account of Mr Mendelson's search for lost relatives in the holocaust. It is hard to critic because of the subject matter which at times is truly horrific as would be expected. There are also moments of levity in his wonderful descriptions of elderly Jewish ladies he befriends and help him with his search. One elderly lady in New York who continuely reminds him that his brother is much better looking. However, the digressions into the Torah and Greek tragedy don't really add much to the story and make it rather long winded. There are so many characters and false leads, that is enough to keep up with, the digressions are not needed. It is an incredible story and shows the persistence and endurance that have made an epic, educational and moving read.

  • Alone in Berlin

  • By: Hans Fallada, Michael Hofmann (translator)
  • Narrated by: John Telfer
  • Length: 20 hrs and 16 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 765
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 576
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 575

Berlin, 1940. The city is paralysed by fear. But one man refuses to be scared.Otto, an ordinary German living in a shabby apartment block, tries to stay out of trouble under Nazi rule. But when he discovers his only son has been killed fighting at the front he's shocked into an extraordinary act of resistance, and starts to drop anonymous postcards attacking Hitler across the city. If caught, he will be executed.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • A mesmerising, life-changing book. Buy it.

  • By James on 19-01-12

The Unlikely Resister

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-03-18

The hero of this book is an unlikely resister. Elderly, uneducated, taciturn, a loner until a tragedy in his life makes him begin a campaign against Hitler and the Nazis. He like his campaign will be destroyed as will his wife. It is utterly doomed to failure by the cowardice of his fellow countryman. Only our hero comes out of the story a noble creature and a few of the lives he touches are also redeemed but they are also destroyed. Was it worth it? There are two other noble creatures in the story The Judge and his fellow prisoner the musician who help our hero. Their lives demonstrate a courage, a quality that inspires in the face of the gross brutality that reigns.

This is a page turning book, an unlikely resister but one that should not be missed.

  • War and Remembrance

  • By: Herman Wouk
  • Narrated by: Kevin Pariseau
  • Length: 56 hrs and 3 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 171
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 138
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 139

Herman Wouk's sweeping epic of World War II, which begins with The Winds of War and continues here in War and Remembrance, stands as the crowning achievement of one of America's most celebrated storytellers. Like no other books about the war, Wouk's spellbinding narrative captures the tide of global events - and all the drama, romance, heroism, and tragedy of World War II - as it immerses us in the lives of a single American family drawn into the very center of the war's maelstrom.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Best read/listen-to for years!

  • By SussexDodo on 10-12-13

Epic story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 10-03-18

This a really good listen. It spans the globe during WWII. The story of the Henrys and the Jastows keeps you enthralled. It is not War and Peace but the research is excellent and the storyline compelling.

Some of the characters are a little two dimensional but I would really recommend. A great listen.

  • The Choice

  • Embrace the Possible
  • By: Edith Eger
  • Narrated by: Edith Eger, Tovah Feldshuh
  • Length: 12 hrs and 26 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 176
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 157
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 158

In 1944, 16-year-old Edith Eger was sent to Auschwitz. There she endured unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele. Over the coming months, Edith's bravery helped her sister to survive and led to her bunkmates rescuing her during a death march. When their camp was finally liberated, Edith was pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive. In The Choice, Dr Edith Eger shares her experience of the Holocaust and the remarkable stories of those she has helped since.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Nothing short of extraordinary-10stars...100stars!

  • By Kathy on 27-09-17

Extraordinary listen

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
4 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 26-10-17

This is an extraordinary story. It is horrifying, raw and deeply personal. I cannot imagine surviving what Edith Eger did but the most extraordinary part is her struggles to overcome her trauma. This is no think pink book and spares nothing as she delves deep within herself to draw out the terrible pain and loss. She is honest about her triumphs and failures truly in a class of its own.