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  • 2
  • helpful votes
  • 3
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  • The Spy and the Traitor

  • By: Ben MacIntyre
  • Narrated by: Ben Macintyre
  • Length: 14 hrs and 32 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 287
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 271
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 270

On a warm July evening in 1985, a middle-aged man stood on the pavement of a busy avenue in the heart of Moscow, holding a plastic carrier bag. In his grey suit and tie, he looked like any other Soviet citizen. The bag alone was mildly conspicuous, printed with the red logo of Safeway, the British supermarket. The man was a spy. A senior KGB officer, for more than a decade he had supplied his British spymasters with a stream of priceless secrets from deep within the Soviet intelligence machine. No spy had done more to damage the KGB. The Safeway bag was a signal: to activate his escape plan to be smuggled out of Soviet Russia.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Amazing

  • By robert on 26-09-18

Another stonking read/listen by Ben Macintyre.

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 09-10-18

this was an amazing story, edge of the seat stuff and very British. I loved it and will be re listening soon.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Rivers of London

  • Rivers of London, Book 1
  • By: Ben Aaronovitch
  • Narrated by: Kobna Holdbrook-Smith
  • Length: 9 hrs and 53 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 7,112
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,824
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,812

My name is Peter Grant and until January, I was just probationary constable in that mighty army for justice known to all right-thinking people as the Metropolitan Police Service (and as the Filth to everybody else). My only concerns in life were how to avoid a transfer to the Case Progression Unit - we do paperwork so real coppers don't have to - and finding a way to climb into the panties of the outrageously perky WPC Leslie May. Then one night, in pursuance of a murder inquiry, I tried to take a witness statement from someone who was dead but disturbingly voluble....

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • brilliant original story great narrator

  • By valb on 05-08-11

A surprise and welcome find

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 27-05-18

I know it’s shallow, but the artwork first attracted me to Rivers of London.

I am so grateful it did, what a fantastic story, I love alternate history and Aaronovitch has created a London we know, but with just enough of a twist to make it fresh and exciting.

I can’t wait to start the next in the series.

The portrayal of Nightingale however does make me think of Jacob Rees Mogg 😳😳

  • Brutal Valour: The Tragedy of Isandlwana

  • The Anglo-Zulu War, Book 1
  • By: James Mace
  • Narrated by: Jonathan Waters
  • Length: 15 hrs and 36 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 21
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 19
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 19

It is December 1878, and war looms on the horizon in South Africa. British high commissioner Sir Henry Bartle-Frere seeks to dismantle the powerful neighboring kingdom of the Zulus and uses an incursion along the disputed border as his justification for war. He issues an impossible ultimatum to the Zulu king, Cetshwayo, demanding he disband his armies and pay massive reparations. With a heavy heart, the king prepares his nation for war against their former allies.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Well worth reading

  • By Amazon Customer on 15-02-18

Isandlwana

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
3 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 01-03-18

This is a story I know well, but still manages to stir the emotions even after all these years.

So listening to a a semi dramatised version was an interesting experience. Quite hammy in parts and really hammering home the jeopardy of the situation.

Overall done really well, although my biggest issue was the narrators pronunciation of many place and character names. He quite literally butchered many names, I mean calling Lord Chelmsford, Lord Kelmsford, that’s such an awful error. But maybe that’s just me?
Of course I’ll have to listen to the Rorkes Drift story now!!!