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Sara

Llanwrtyd wells, United Kingdom
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  • Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

  • By: Douglas Adams
  • Narrated by: Stephen Fry
  • Length: 5 hrs and 51 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 5,213
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 4,669
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,663

One Thursday lunchtime the Earth gets unexpectedly demolished to make way for a new hyperspace bypass. For Arthur Dent, who has only just had his house demolished that morning, this seems already to be more than he can cope with.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Excellent story, really well-read

  • By Tony on 14-10-13

A classic from a comic genius, read wonderfully

Overall
5 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-13

Where does Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy rank among all the audiobooks you’ve listened to so far?

Pretty high up. I had read the book and seen the BBC series beforehand so knew the story (so far) so there was not the novelty factor of other great reads. It was great to listen to.

Who was your favorite character and why?

Arthur Dent. A man more out of his depth than any other man has ever been out of his depth before, and unlikely to be outdone as his planet has been destroyed and he is the last man alive, in or out of his depth.

Was this a book you wanted to listen to all in one sitting?

Yes

Any additional comments?

A great book that everyone should read before the end of the world.

12 of 15 people found this review helpful

  • Under the Dome

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Raul Esparza
  • Length: 34 hrs and 24 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 3,090
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,094
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,095

In Stephen King's mesmerizing new masterpiece - his biggest, most riveting novel since The Stand - a Maine town and its inhabitants are isolated from the world by an invisible, impenetrable dome. Celebrated storyteller Stephen King returns to his roots in this tour de force featuring more than 100 characters - some heroic, some diabolical - and a supernatural element as baffling and chilling as any he's ever conjured.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • Typical Stephen King

  • By Robert on 01-01-10

Excellent but a little empty

Overall
4 out of 5 stars
Performance
5 out of 5 stars
Story
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 04-09-13

What made the experience of listening to Under the Dome the most enjoyable?

Wonderful narration - a tough task with so many charachters. Strange as it sounds, I think the true test of a good narrator is whether you notice them or not! I was unaware of the narrator in as much as I was not pulled up short by any terrible pronunciation, awful accents or inconsistencies.

What did you like best about this story?

Great concept and likeable characters. The what-if story held together with excellent research and a feeling of authenticity.

The story was a little frustrating in that the level of stupidity of the various good guys who tried to take on the main antagonist was such that it started to feel a little unreal. Without spoiling the plot, the antagonist seemed to get away with it all and for me there was no sense of directed justice. I think this may be just me though.

I also sensed the minor flaw throughout that (for the sake of a good story) the outside world was too excluded from the decision making processes within the dome, which was fully communicable with.

Small gripes for an otherwise excellent experience.

  • The Twelve

  • Book Two of The Passage Trilogy
  • By: Justin Cronin
  • Narrated by: Scott Brick
  • Length: 26 hrs and 22 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 1,176
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 940
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 938

Death-row prisoners with nightmare pasts and no future…. Until they were selected for a secret experiment….to create something more than human.

Now they are the future and humanity's worst nightmare has begun. The Twelve is the epic sequel to The Passage. Read by Scott Brick.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • even better the second time

  • By TSUK79 on 17-07-16

Excellent

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-04-13

An excellent sequel to a superb first novel. If you enjoyed the first and are considering continuing the adventure, then I highly recommend it. If you have not read either book and like the Zombie/Action genre, then you are missing out and you should use your credits accordingly now!

2 of 5 people found this review helpful

  • The Time Keeper

  • By: Mitch Albom
  • Narrated by: Dan Stevens
  • Length: 4 hrs and 41 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 103
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 80
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 80

In this stunning new novel, the inventor of the world's first clock is punished for trying to measure time. He is banished to a cave for centuries and forced to listen to the voices of all who come after him seeking more years for themselves. At last, with his soul nearly broken, Father Time is granted his freedom, along with a mission: a chance to redeem himself by teaching two earthly people the true meaning of time.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • What a gem

  • By mollymoon1 on 23-07-13

Rather irksome

Overall
2 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 03-04-13

A bit of a simple story with not very much to offer. It reads a bit like an extended parable that tells us to value the experiences of our one life rather than to count the minutes in it. As such, the first person to start counting minutes gets condemned to 6,000 years in a cave as stalactites form around him, listening to the voices of man's ever-increasing obsession with his discovery - Time. He is then released into a modern world where he is instructed to convey his disproportionately hard-learnt lesson to two self-indulgent, selfish and thoroughly unlikeable humans. Only then can he die.



This would not be so bad, but every so often the author refers to how it was God that actually gave us one life to live and that this man was condemned to his lengthy isolation because God must have been cross with him. However typical this sort of behaviour is by God, which I can accept, what irked me was the way the author seemed to completely fail to spot the irony of his words.



It is my opinion that the whole afterlife (or second life) thing that God offers those of belief, and the huge amount of time they waste in convincing God to let them have said second life, epitomises the wasting of the one real life that the boundless wonder of the universe has accidentally bestowed upon them!



In a nutshell, if you are trying to extol the value of living your life to the full and to savour the experiences its short span has to offer, one should take it from a humanist perspective and not a religious one that promises you a second life only if you waste the first one appeasing a jealous god that would put you in a cave for 6,000 years for doing what comes naturally - curiosity.



If you want my opinion, as someone who has read and understands the message of the book, spend the valuable 4hrs 41mins (16,860 seconds) this book lasts doing something else other than reading it.

4 of 7 people found this review helpful

The Name of the Wind (Part Two) cover art
  • The Name of the Wind (Part Two)

  • By: Patrick Rothfuss
  • Narrated by: Rupert Degas
  • Length: 11 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    5 out of 5 stars 2,294
  • Performance
    5 out of 5 stars 1,694
  • Story
    5 out of 5 stars 1,689

Part Two of The Name of The Wind (Unabridged).'I have stolen princesses back from sleeping barrow kings. I burned down the town of Trebon. I have spent the night with Felurian and left with both my sanity and my life. I was expelled from the University at a younger age than most people are allowed in. I tread paths by moonlight that others fear to speak of during day. I have talked to Gods, loved women, and written songs that make the minstrels weep. My name is Kvothe. You may have heard of me'.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Absolutely BRILLIANT!

  • By Marcus H. on 01-10-12

Masterful fantasy

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-12-12

This book and its sequel are fantastic and I am sad to have to put the world within it on hold until the third and final installment. The story is gripping, the characters engaging and the narration perfect. A wonderful production that I would highly recommend.

  • The Inverted World

  • By: Christopher Priest
  • Narrated by: Steven Cree
  • Length: 9 hrs and 46 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 74
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 66
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 66

A uniquely powerful novel of a society in decay. On a planet whose very nature is a mystery a massive decrepit city is pulled along a massive railway track, laying the line down before it as it progresses into the wilderness. The society within toils under an oppressive regime, its structures always on the point of collapse, the lives of its individuals lived in misery. No one knows where they are going, why they are going or what they will find when they get there.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Love this book - always have

  • By Sean on 08-02-13

Interesting concepts

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-12-12

I loved The Prestige by CP and have waited for this one to come on Audible. It is a peculiar and very original story that has been praised for capturing the essence of what Science Fiction should be about. I found the slow progress of the city on wheels interesting and really wanted to know why the world within the book was as it was, forcing me to listen with rapt curiosity and when the denouement came, I was satisfied.



The opening phrase "I had reached the age of six hundred and fifty miles" has been described as "one of the most famous in science fiction" (Critic Paul Kincaid, Wiki) and to me it beautifully and succinctly captures the terrible situation of the ensuing story in just a few words.



Very interesting and enjoyable SF listen. Well read.

1 of 1 people found this review helpful

  • 11.22.63

  • By: Stephen King
  • Narrated by: Craig Wasson
  • Length: 30 hrs and 38 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4.5 out of 5 stars 4,140
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,956
  • Story
    4.5 out of 5 stars 2,947

What if you could go back in time and change the course of history?11.22.63, the date that Kennedy was shot - unless.... King takes his protagonist Jake Epping, a high school English teacher from Lisbon Falls, Maine, 2011, on a fascinating journey back to 1958 - from a world of mobile phones and iPods to a new world of Elvis and JFK, of Plymouth Fury cars and Lindy Hopping, of a troubled loner named Lee Harvey Oswald and a beautiful high school librarian named Sadie Dunhill who becomes the love of Jake's life.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Return to top form

  • By John on 14-12-11

50s/60s Nostalgia with a great story

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 13-12-12

This is one of Stephen Kings better novels. I found myself very involved in the story and interested in the fate of the two main characters. SK obviously loves the 50s/60s American era and writes with passion about the mood of the time, helping transport the listener back to what seems like another world. The story sags almost imperceptibly in the middle, but other than that it is a great listening experience, which is well read

  • The Strange Affair of Spring Heeled Jack

  • Burton & Swinburne, Book 1
  • By: Mark Hodder
  • Narrated by: Gerard Doyle
  • Length: 14 hrs and 4 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 243
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 186
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 182

Sir Richard Francis Burton is an explorer, linguist, scholar, and swordsman. His reputation has been tarnished, his career is in tatters, and his former partner is missing and probably dead. Algernon Charles Swinburne is an unsuccessful poet and follower of de Sade, for whom pain is pleasure and brandy is ruin. The two men are sucked into the perilous depths of this moral and ethical vacuum, when Lord Palmerston commissions Burton to investigate assaults on young women.

  • 2 out of 5 stars
  • Not for me

  • By L on 03-06-15

Odd, Original and Memorable

Overall
4 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 21-06-12

An entertaining story that hangs together pretty well. It has some dark moments but it also has moments that did make me smile. The author writes well although sometimes he is a little repetitive on a particular point.

It is mainly a time-travel story in which a man from the 23rd century, keen to reinstate the family's good name, tries to stop his ancestor from killing Queen Victoria and in the attempt dramatically changes the course of history. During the course of the book there is a bit of confusion about the paradoxes that the storyline sets up, but it is all lost in the enjoyable silliness of it all, including a Charles Darwin with two brains and a mechanical Brunel!

Spring-Heeled Jack is a real Victorian phenomena and is worth a look in Wikipedia, but read this after you have listened to the book! Hodder has carefully followed the 'real' myth and speculation in the story he has woven.

The narrator also does a fine job.

5 of 6 people found this review helpful

  • The Night Watch

  • Watch, Book 1
  • By: Sergei Lukyanenko
  • Narrated by: Paul Michael
  • Length: 14 hrs and 45 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 307
  • Performance
    4.5 out of 5 stars 202
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 204

Set in modern day Moscow, Night Watch is a world as elaborate and imaginative as Tolkien or the best Asimov. Living among us are the "Others," an ancient race of humans with supernatural powers who swear allegiance to either the Dark or the Light. A thousand-year treaty has maintained the balance of power, and the two sides coexist in an uneasy truce. But an ancient prophecy decrees that one supreme "Other" will rise up and tip the balance, plunging the world into a catastrophic war between the Dark and the Light.

  • 4 out of 5 stars
  • A Very Good Listen

  • By Pauline on 04-03-12

Great take on vampires and good vs. evil

Overall
5 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 15-05-12

Highly recommended as it takes a really interesting angle on good vs. evil and the balance that must be maintained in the secret world that the normal person does not see. It is excellently written (or at least translated) and the narrator does a good job with it. I will be buying the next two books in the trilogy.

2 of 2 people found this review helpful

  • Boneshaker

  • By: Cherie Priest
  • Narrated by: Wil Wheaton, Kate Reading
  • Length: 13 hrs and 42 mins
  • Unabridged
  • Overall
    4 out of 5 stars 123
  • Performance
    4 out of 5 stars 81
  • Story
    4 out of 5 stars 82

In the early days of the Civil War, rumors of gold in the frozen Klondike brought hordes of newcomers to the Pacific Northwest. Anxious to compete, Russian prospectors commissioned inventor Leviticus Blue to create a great machine that could mine through Alaska’s ice. Thus was Dr. Blue’s Incredible Bone-Shaking Drill Engine born.

  • 5 out of 5 stars
  • Steampunk Adventure

  • By Ian David Burrell on 15-07-11

Entertaining but flawed

Overall
3 out of 5 stars

Reviewed: 29-04-11

I enjoyed listening to this book but I thought the plot was a little daft and facets of the story were flawed, so that I found it difficult to believe and get involved in it.

For example, inside the walled-off city there are hundreds of typically slow, loping and utterly unscary undead. Some 'living' people chose to remain in the poisoned city when the wall was erected and now eek out a living and existence there. The main protagonists enter the city 16 years after the wall went up and are chased by the undead only to be saved by one of the (living) locals who has a mechanical 'clapper' device. This sonic weapon stuns and incapacitates great swathes of the marauding zombies for maybe five minutes. My point is, why hasn't anyone done the kind thing and despatched all the undead while they are lying prone and unable to defend themselves? This weapon introduces the possibility that the living could have cleared the whole city of the undead in maybe the first week (after its invention), but instead are themselves being picked off by the zombies, some of whom must be eligible for bus-passes by now.

Also, a toxic smog covers the whole city, but the wealthy seem to have crops and chickens for food, with no mention of how this trick is achieved - maybe mini gas-masks for the chickens?

It was points like these that frustrated me a little, since the society that has been carved out in the city has not been thought out properly by the author, and if she's not clear on how the city has evolved over the years, what hope is there for me?

If you can suspend, or preferably throttle your disbelief for a few hours, this was an entertaining listen, which I thought was well read by both narrators, who made a good effort of bringing Ms Priest's characters and story to undeath.

4 of 5 people found this review helpful